Mature students is it worth getting student accommodation? Watch

DarthCookie
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So, I’m a 34 year old guy, about to start an undergraduate degree in Psychology at Bournemouth university. I currently live about an hours train ride away from the uni. So, I’m wondering if it’s worth staying were I am and commuting or booking accommodation?
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claireestelle
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(Original post by DarthCookie)
So, I’m a 34 year old guy, about to start an undergraduate degree in Psychology at Bournemouth university. I currently live about an hours train ride away from the uni. So, I’m wondering if it’s worth staying were I am and commuting or booking accommodation?
how much does the train cost? if it's near the accommodation price i'd stay in accommodation
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DarthCookie
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It’s around roughly £175 per month on the train. Depending on whether I go for a season ticket not . Accommodation for a standard room is, I think, £595. A couple of friends thought it might be social suicide in not staying in accommodation.
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BU Students
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Hi, I'm a mature student and I didn't move into halls. I still joined a variety of clubs and societies in my first year but in my second year found I didn't have time to maintain them all (along with all the other "mature" responsibilities outside of uni)!

I would ask yourself these questions:

1) Do you want to have a lively first year at uni (nights out, parties, potentially noisy flatmates and neighbours)?
2) Do you mind living with younger students? Although you can see the age of the students in your flat when booking, many mature students may be living in a house share instead.
3) Halls are quite expensive, more so than the train. If you stay in halls the majority of your student loan will go on this, saying that, if you really want to live in halls it's an experience likely to be worth that cost.
4) If you get the train, have you thought about the time you'd need to leave to get to a 9am lecture?

Most of the mature students I know stayed at home and commuted in, however that didn't stop them getting involved in the fun side of uni life, plus it saved them a lot of money.

Do you have any other questions about being a mature student?

Vicki
(Original post by DarthCookie)
So, I’m a 34 year old guy, about to start an undergraduate degree in Psychology at Bournemouth university. I currently live about an hours train ride away from the uni. So, I’m wondering if it’s worth staying were I am and commuting or booking accommodation?
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DarthCookie
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(Original post by DarthCookie)
It’s around roughly £175 per month on the train. Depending on whether I go for a season ticket not . Accommodation for a standard room is, I think, £595. A couple of friends thought it might be social suicide in not staying in accommodation.
Thank you for getting back to me Vicki. I do have a few more questions: 1) How did you find travelling back and forth from lectures?
2) What's the work load like for first and second year?

In answer to those questions;

1) I'm not really much of a drinker or a party person.
2) I don't mind living with younger students.
3) I've noticed that with the prices with halls, which is why I'm leaning towards commuting from my area.
4) I've had a look, it should be doable - providing I leave around 7am; as it's just an hour's train ride.

So, having thought about it I think the sensible option would be to commute. That's what I was a little worried about missing out on the fun side of things.
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BU Students
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The main reason for halls is really being close to the lectures, learning to become independent and the social side that comes with it! If you're not much of a drinker you'd probably find it difficult living with first years haha! Have a look at the BU clubs and societies to see if there's anything you fancy exploring. Psychology is a large cohort and always has other mature students too so you'll have no issues making new friends, even with commuting.

In answer to your other questions, I actually live in Bournemouth but where I live can sometimes take up to an hour to get home depending on what time the lecture is (I'm not a fan of 9am lectures for that reason or ones finishing 4/5pm), I'm based at both Talbot and Lansdowne and if traffic is bad have usually either planned to walk or run home. I know other students who have commuted from Southampton and for the earlier lectures they've just made an effort to leave earlier, hopefully you won't get any 9am lectures. It can be frustrating when you have a lecture 9am-10am and then another late afternoon but the savvy students used the time in between to work on assignments, do group work, go to a society, run errands (like opticians and other boring tasks) or go to the gym, fingers crossed your timetable will be good though!

I would say that first year workload is fine for most courses, if there is anything you're struggling with just make sure you put in the extra time to learn it, either on your own or ask for help. I think many students expect their lecturers to tell them everything but in reality there is a lot of reading you'll need to do away from uni. I have friends studying psychology and in their first year they did weekly quizzes which counted towards their first year grades but I'm not sure if this is still something that is done - but they appreciated it.

Second year is completely different, the academic expectations rise considerably meaning time management is key! I've still done really well but have had to make some social sacrifices as I also run my own business, which I'm hoping a degree will only add to!

It's all possible though, and will be worth it! Have you done any recent study?

Vicki
(Original post by DarthCookie)
Thank you for getting back to me Vicki. I do have a few more questions: 1) How did you find travelling back and forth from lectures?
2) What's the work load like for first and second year?

In answer to those questions;

1) I'm not really much of a drinker or a party person.
2) I don't mind living with younger students.
3) I've noticed that with the prices with halls, which is why I'm leaning towards commuting from my area.
4) I've had a look, it should be doable - providing I leave around 7am; as it's just an hour's train ride.

So, having thought about it I think the sensible option would be to commute. That's what I was a little worried about missing out on the fun side of things.
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Bongo Bongo
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(Original post by DarthCookie)
So, I’m a 34 year old guy, about to start an undergraduate degree in Psychology at Bournemouth university. I currently live about an hours train ride away from the uni. So, I’m wondering if it’s worth staying were I am and commuting or booking accommodation?
Hi, I'm 28 and about to do an MSc at Bournemouth. I would say that getting a room in a student house is the cheapest option but a room in Okeford halls (which is only for postgrads and mature students is another option!)
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tarawhitters
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Are you still looking for accommodation?
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