Gvasil
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Hi there, I'm considering studying post-grad Real Estate as I've been working in the industry for 6 years, however I'd like to work in the leadership team rather than operational team. I think this degree would open different doors for me. The only worry is whether the course consists of finance modules and how much math knowledge would I need. Is it more software that we'd use or actual maths? Also, would I be learning any softwares the industry uses? Thank you very much with any info you may provide me with. GV
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timleebcu
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There are some that will have a focus more on modelling and complex financial models but they'll tend to have investment/finance in their titles - they're then probably aiming at the finance APC pathway which is quite a narrow speciality.

The general real estate masters will probably be geared towards the commercial practice and valuation APC pathways which are rather broader in scope.

As regards software some courses will have varying levels of use of industry standard software, but it is important to understand the underlying maths so you've got some hope to know whether what pops out the end of the software is sensible or not.

I can give you a breakdown of what it looks like at Birmingham City University (I'm real estate course leader)
We have six taught modules: Valuation, Commercial Inspection and Surveying, Law and Practice, Property Management, Development Project, Professional Practice, and a dissertation.

Out of those the valuation, property management and development project modules do include some maths - nothing beyond GCSE level and we'd tend to push towards using Excel for anything a bit more complex - commercial software such as Argus essentially acts as a front to a hidden spreadsheet underneath.

On top of that we make extensive use of CoStar and to a lesser extent Estates Gazette to drive what we're doing, as as far as possible we try and make assessments similar to real world work.

Hope that's of some use.
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Gvasil
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(Original post by timleebcu)
There are some that will have a focus more on modelling and complex financial models but they'll tend to have investment/finance in their titles - they're then probably aiming at the finance APC pathway which is quite a narrow speciality.

The general real estate masters will probably be geared towards the commercial practice and valuation APC pathways which are rather broader in scope.

As regards software some courses will have varying levels of use of industry standard software, but it is important to understand the underlying maths so you've got some hope to know whether what pops out the end of the software is sensible or not.

I can give you a breakdown of what it looks like at Birmingham City University (I'm real estate course leader)
We have six taught modules: Valuation, Commercial Inspection and Surveying, Law and Practice, Property Management, Development Project, Professional Practice, and a dissertation.

Out of those the valuation, property management and development project modules do include some maths - nothing beyond GCSE level and we'd tend to push towards using Excel for anything a bit more complex - commercial software such as Argus essentially acts as a front to a hidden spreadsheet underneath.

On top of that we make extensive use of CoStar and to a lesser extent Estates Gazette to drive what we're doing, as as far as possible we try and make assessments similar to real world work.

Hope that's of some use.
Thank you very much for detailed information. I wonder if it's possible at all to have a taster of a module consisting of some maths for me to understand if I'd manage to succeed in the course. Do you know if this is something universities do, especially for masters degrees?
Thank you
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timleebcu
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There's a sample chapter from a valuation textbook here Image (not sure if the link has worked so I've put it as plain text below in case) that gives an idea of the level of maths required.

In these you'll see reference to YP and a multiplier number is given straight in the text - they'll be a previous chapter in the book explaining the underlying calculation, eg: (one version of) YP = 1/[i x (1+i)^n]
When learning I think it's important to get an understanding of what these underlying equations are, but in practice you'd use tables/Excel/commercial valuation software to actually work that bit out for you, hence the text book going straight for the multiplier.

It might be a bit hard to follow a chapter out of context like that but hopefully it gives you some idea of the level of maths required.

https://www.blackwellpublishing.com/...5559_4_004.pdf
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