justagirltbh
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#1
The electric motor in the car is powered by a battery. To charge the battery, the car is plugged into the mains supply at 230v. The power used to charge the battery is 6.9KW. Calculate the current used to charge the battery.



current= ______________ A





I have this question for my homework its for physics a level but its a gcse question.... Could someone please help me ?Thank you its due tomorrow
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 months ago
#2
(Original post by Ruqaiyahhhh_)
The electric motor in the car is powered by a battery. To charge the battery, the car is plugged into the mains supply at 230v. The power used to charge the battery is 6.9KW. Calculate the current used to charge the battery.



current= ______________ A





I have this question for my homework its for physics a level but its a gcse question.... Could someone please help me ?Thank you its due tomorrow
This is a very simple question, read up on Ohms law
0
reply
justagirltbh
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#3
(Original post by mnot)
This is a very simple question, read up on Ohms law
i have ive got the equation and everything i just need help figuring the whole thing out
0
reply
Pyruvic Acid
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 9 months ago
#4
I don't see why that should be A level - it seems perfectly fine for GCSE. What values do you have? What equation links these values?
Also, please try not to create dup threads.
1
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 months ago
#5
(Original post by Ruqaiyahhhh_)
i have ive got the equation and everything i just need help figuring the whole thing out
You have the power & the voltage & you need to find the current, im sure if you go through your notes you'll find the relevant equation.
0
reply
justagirltbh
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#6
(Original post by mnot)
You have the power & the voltage & you need to find the current, im sure if you go through your notes you'll find the relevant equation.
so theres 230 v

and the power used to charge the battery is 6.9kw



current in amps= charge in coulombs divided by time in seconds or i= q divided by t


i just dont know the rest
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 9 months ago
#7
(Original post by Ruqaiyahhhh_)
so theres 230 v

and the power used to charge the battery is 6.9kw



current in amps= charge in coulombs divided by time in seconds or i= q divided by t


i just dont know the rest
You dont need to use time or coulombs your not calculating the energy.

Focus specifically on the 3 things:
-power
-voltage
-current
0
reply
RogerOxon
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 months ago
#8
(Original post by justagirltbh)
The electric motor in the car is powered by a battery. To charge the battery, the car is plugged into the mains supply at 230v. The power used to charge the battery is 6.9KW. Calculate the current used to charge the battery.



current= ______________ A





I have this question for my homework its for physics a level but its a gcse question.... Could someone please help me ?Thank you its due tomorrow
Voltage is Joules per Coulomb.
Current is Coulombs per second.
Power is Joules per second.
0
reply
maniiiiii
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 months ago
#9
(Original post by hollie_cart16)
If it’s so simple work it out and help them?? Don’t be arsey about it
It's not "aresy", the person that posted this defo aint an A level student. The person was just getting them to figure it out for themselves, because if you're studying A level Physics and can't answer this, that's a bit worrying no? How you going to learn if you don't do it yourself?
1
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 months ago
#10
(Original post by hollie_cart16)
If it’s so simple work it out and help them?? Don’t be arsey about it
I wasnt being arsey. I was trying to get them to figure it out for themselves.

The formula for this would likely be on page 1 or 2 of their resources for this topic. It's important people understand the foundation so as they build up it all makes sense.
0
reply
guanj-y19
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 months ago
#11
People need help sometimes, but you can't just give them the answers cos they won't learn. Tips will help a lot and so will hints.
1
reply
hollie_cart16
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#12
Report 7 months ago
#12
(Original post by maniiiiii)
It's not "aresy", the person that posted this defo aint an A level student. The person was just getting them to figure it out for themselves, because if you're studying A level Physics and can't answer this, that's a bit worrying no? How you going to learn if you don't do it yourself?
People struggle at different things and sometimes need a little bit of guidance. All they were asking for was help. And if you know how to do it you may as well help them??
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 7 months ago
#13
(Original post by hollie_cart16)
People struggle at different things and sometimes need a little bit of guidance. All they were asking for was help. And if you know how to do it you may as well help them??
Their is not whole lot of hints you can give to such a question, anything tangible would give them the formula to the final answer. It's also a topic this student needs to read up on if they are studying A-level physics, you need to consider the context.
1
reply
hollie_cart16
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#14
Report 7 months ago
#14
(Original post by mnot)
I wasnt being arsey. I was trying to get them to figure it out for themselves.

The formula for this would likely be on page 1 or 2 of their resources for this topic. It's important people understand the foundation so as they build up it all makes sense.
If the formula was on a page for their resources topic don’t you think they would’ve done it on their own? They asked for help. Instead of saying it’s simple and tell them it’s ohms law. Guide them or tell them how it’s done.
0
reply
guanj-y19
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#15
Report 7 months ago
#15
Because just giving them the answer loses the meaning of a question. It tests your knowledge, not someone else's
0
reply
guanj-y19
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#16
Report 7 months ago
#16
giving the answer is only done when they have struggled for a long time
0
reply
hollie_cart16
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#17
Report 7 months ago
#17
(Original post by guanj-y19)
Because just giving them the answer loses the meaning of a question. It tests your knowledge, not someone else's
If you’re not going to help someone then don’t bother commenting. It would save your time and their time
0
reply
guanj-y19
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#18
Report 7 months ago
#18
We are helping in little bits, not just shoving it into their hands.
1
reply
maniiiiii
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#19
Report 7 months ago
#19
(Original post by hollie_cart16)
People struggle at different things and sometimes need a little bit of guidance. All they were asking for was help. And if you know how to do it you may as well help them??
LOOL fr a little bit of guidance, not the answer. I get that it would be easy to do so but long term it aint helping them and more time just delaying the problem that will pop up again in the future. Getting them to figure it out themselves will mean they're more likely to remember the method of how to do it.
1
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report 7 months ago
#20
(Original post by hollie_cart16)
If the formula was on a page for their resources topic don’t you think they would’ve done it on their own? They asked for help. Instead of saying it’s simple and tell them it’s ohms law. Guide them or tell them how it’s done.
Telling them to look up Ohms law was the guidance. Quite why your bumping a month old thread with these pretty petty comments which also isn't at all useful.

As I said this would be near the start of the notes for the topic, I dont think you are considering the topic itself with your comments. Giving them anything more tangible would meant they just find out the number but dont learn anything.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (19)
7.48%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (38)
14.96%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (45)
17.72%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (37)
14.57%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (68)
26.77%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (47)
18.5%

Watched Threads

View All