How hard is it to get into Oxbridge?

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pricklyhedgehog
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I’m currently GCSE student, going onto A-Level in September. I’m thinking about my future or what possible careers/degrees I could take...I’m just very curious - how hard is it to get into an Oxbridge University?
I (might be) taking maths, physics and music A-Levels in September, and what grades would I need to get a place for Law at Oxbridge? I’ve taken my Grade 8 piano, got a distinction and I’m working towards DipABRSM on top of my studies. I’m also working towards my Grade 8 in music theory. My GCSE mocks were mainly all 7s, 8s and 9s (except for a 5 in Spanish and 6 in Chemistry oop). I’m very passionate in Law and considering becoming a Human Rights Lawyer when I’m older. I’d just like a very honest opinion about how hard it really is to get in. I don’t attend a private school, and I heard a very large percentage of Oxbridge students attended some of the top private schools!
Those who got into Oxbridge, what did your grades look like and what is it like studying there? Do extra-curriculars helps, like musical instruments?
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I have a Cambridge offer, but haven’t started there yet (still need to meet the conditions of my offer for my a level grades)
My GCSEs were similar to your mocks. I got 7s, 8s and 9s mostly (with two 6s in chemistry and physics). I also did an extra gcse in year 7, which I failed and got a D in (why do they let year 7s do GCSEs??) but they didn’t seem to care about that.
As for extra-curriculars, they are more interested in what is called “super-curriculars”. The difference is that extra curricular means activities unrelated to your course like music or sport (unless you study that of course), whereas super curricular means things like extra reading related to your course. It would also include MOOCs, which are online courses. The website coursera has loads you can sign up for. It will ask if you want to pay £40 for a certificate but you don’t need a certificate, and the course itself is free. Also work experience that is directly related to law would be good if possible.
Stuff like this is great to talk about on your personal statement because it shows you have a real interest in the subject and are willing to go out of your way to pursue it.
Also if your schools offers an EPQ then doing one on law would be very impressive.
Btw I also didn’t go to a private school, and I know a lot of people at my school also got offers so it is not impossible.
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pricklyhedgehog
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I have a Cambridge offer, but haven’t started there yet (still need to meet the conditions of my offer for my a level grades)
My GCSEs were similar to your mocks. I got 7s, 8s and 9s mostly (with two 6s in chemistry and physics). I also did an extra gcse in year 7, which I failed and got a D in (why do they let year 7s do GCSEs??) but they didn’t seem to care about that.
As for extra-curriculars, they are more interested in what is called “super-curriculars”. The difference is that extra curricular means activities unrelated to your course like music or sport (unless you study that of course), whereas super curricular means things like extra reading related to your course. It would also include MOOCs, which are online courses. The website coursera has loads you can sign up for. It will ask if you want to pay £40 for a certificate but you don’t need a certificate, and the course itself is free. Also work experience that is directly related to law would be good if possible.
Stuff like this is great to talk about on your personal statement because it shows you have a real interest in the subject and are willing to go out of your way to pursue it.
Also if your schools offers an EPQ then doing one on law would be very impressive.
Btw I also didn’t go to a private school, and I know a lot of people at my school also got offers so it is not impossible.
Yeah I did an extra GCSE earlier on this year in French and I got a 9. I’ll have 11 GCSEs by the end of the year. I’m not very certain on anything atm, nevermind potential unis and I’m not even sure if I’d even want to attend an Oxbridge one. I feel like I’d get singled out because I’m not exactly from a higher class area, and I’m not even certain on Law yet. Would you recommend I did A-Level music though? Considering I’ve already got my grade 8, would it lower the value of my grade 8 if I did A-Level Music too? I was also considering history maybe.
(Oh and good luck with your A Levels!)
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Geth071002
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(Original post by pricklyhedgehog)
Yeah I did an extra GCSE earlier on this year in French and I got a 9. I’ll have 11 GCSEs by the end of the year. I’m not very certain on anything atm, nevermind potential unis and I’m not even sure if I’d even want to attend an Oxbridge one. I feel like I’d get singled out because I’m not exactly from a higher class area, and I’m not even certain on Law yet. Would you recommend I did A-Level music though? Considering I’ve already got my grade 8, would it lower the value of my grade 8 if I did A-Level Music too? I was also considering history maybe.
(Oh and good luck with your A Levels!)
I had an Cambridge interview for law with much poorer GCSEs then you ( rejected post interview but eligible for adjustment due to the area I live in ) . I would suggest taking “hard “subjects like history , English lit , mathematics , physics , another language or anything along those lines as I myself took a mix of soft and easy subjects which is most likely why I did not get in along with some other factors like a poor second interview performance.
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Geth071002
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(Original post by Geth071002)
I had an Cambridge interview for law with much poorer GCSEs then you ( rejected post interview but eligible for adjustment due to the area I live in ) . I would suggest taking “hard “subjects like history , English lit , mathematics , physics , another language or anything along those lines as I myself took a mix of soft and easy subjects which is most likely why I did not get in along with some other factors like a poor second interview performance.
Also your Personal statement needs to show why you want to study law and what super curricular activities have you done that ties in with why you want to study law . If you’re applying to Oxford you will need to do something called the LNAT which you’ll need to score around 28/42 on to be give yourself the best chance of getting a place ( this doesn’t apply to Cambridge as they scraped their Lnat requirements)
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idonthaveaname1223
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(Original post by pricklyhedgehog)
I’m currently GCSE student, going onto A-Level in September. I’m thinking about my future or what possible careers/degrees I could take...I’m just very curious - how hard is it to get into an Oxbridge University?
I (might be) taking maths, physics and music A-Levels in September, and what grades would I need to get a place for Law at Oxbridge? I’ve taken my Grade 8 piano, got a distinction and I’m working towards DipABRSM on top of my studies. I’m also working towards my Grade 8 in music theory. My GCSE mocks were mainly all 7s, 8s and 9s (except for a 5 in Spanish and 6 in Chemistry oop). I’m very passionate in Law and considering becoming a Human Rights Lawyer when I’m older. I’d just like a very honest opinion about how hard it really is to get in. I don’t attend a private school, and I heard a very large percentage of Oxbridge students attended some of the top private schools!
Those who got into Oxbridge, what did your grades look like and what is it like studying there? Do extra-curriculars helps, like musical instruments?
it’s attainable definitely, and I think your gcse predictions are good enough, and they’re definitely promising for your results! However, I’d suggest to speak to an admissions officer, or send them an FOI about taking physics maths and music and getting into law. I don’t think your background will disadvantage you ( a few of my friends are going oxbridge hopefully and we’re all in lower income areas and families and are contextual applicants) but I think your choice of subjects MAY disadvantage you especially with a career like law. Law is extremely competitive and it’s didfult to get into the best unis, so id say advantage yourself as best as possible and take a levels like government and politics, economics, English or history instead of music! Hope this helps!
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liverninthered
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The only grades in those A levels you'd need would be AAA/A*AA - i.e. meet the grade requirements for the course. Your music grades, though no doubt impressive, are irrelevant for a law degree and are not a factor in admissions. For Oxford especially, your application would be helped by a high number of 8 and 9s at GCSE. Most UK students at Oxbridge did not go to a private school (around 60% went to state).

More important than any of the above is good performance on any admissions tests and interviews. They are used to decide amongst applicants, many of whom will have similar grades.

Some one else mentioned taking more "hard" subjects at A level - I don't think that advice was very useful. However, you might consider taking an essay based subject, if only because it may be helpful in admission test and useful preparation for the degree itself. Having said that, you wouldn't be the first to get in without an essay subject.

The best thing to do for now is learn about the study of law.
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(Original post by liverninthered)
The only grades in those A levels you'd need would be AAA/A*AA - i.e. meet the grade requirements for the course. Your music grades, though no doubt impressive, are irrelevant for a law degree and are not a factor in admissions. For Oxford especially, your application would be helped by a high number of 8 and 9s at GCSE. Most UK students at Oxbridge did not go to a private school (around 60% went to state).

More important than any of the above is good performance on any admissions tests and interviews. They are used to decide amongst applicants, many of whom will have similar grades.

Some one else mentioned taking more "hard" subjects at A level - I don't think that advice was very useful. However, you might consider taking an essay based subject, if only because it may be helpful in admission test and useful preparation for the degree itself. Having said that, you wouldn't be the first to get in without an essay subject.

The best thing to do for now is learn about the study of law.
Alright thank you, that was very helpful. I have a family friend who was accepted into Oxford a few years ago. Apparently during the interview they were particularly impressed with her music grades (two grade 8s), hence why I asked about whether it matters or not. I mean obviously it is irrelevant to Law but apparently they like to see what other interests you have and how determined you are. I mean obviously the most important factor is good grades and showing large amounts of wider reading into the subject you want to do, but I mean I don’t even think Oxbridge would be for me even if I did get in! Also, apparently Music A Level is considered a ‘harder’ subject - or from what I’ve heard it is considered an essay based subject and Universities regard it highly, but I’m not sure whether this still applies from an Oxbridge perspective! And yes I’m going into further reading of law - again I’m really unsure about everything at the moment, I have slight dyslexia and I hate reading so I’ve been told it would be very determined of me if I did pursue a law career!
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by pricklyhedgehog)
I’m currently GCSE student, going onto A-Level in September. I’m thinking about my future or what possible careers/degrees I could take...I’m just very curious - how hard is it to get into an Oxbridge University?
I (might be) taking maths, physics and music A-Levels in September, and what grades would I need to get a place for Law at Oxbridge? I’ve taken my Grade 8 piano, got a distinction and I’m working towards DipABRSM on top of my studies. I’m also working towards my Grade 8 in music theory. My GCSE mocks were mainly all 7s, 8s and 9s (except for a 5 in Spanish and 6 in Chemistry oop). I’m very passionate in Law and considering becoming a Human Rights Lawyer when I’m older. I’d just like a very honest opinion about how hard it really is to get in. I don’t attend a private school, and I heard a very large percentage of Oxbridge students attended some of the top private schools!
Those who got into Oxbridge, what did your grades look like and what is it like studying there? Do extra-curriculars helps, like musical instruments?
Irrelevant extracurricular activities are not normally really considered by Oxford and Cambridge (although may be considered by other unis). So your music activities are not really going to be of enormous interest if you aren't applying to music, for those two unis. They are mainly going to be looking at your general academic abilities and critical reasoning skills. How well you can play X instrument doesn't tell them how good you are at writing essays about legal problems.

They realise of course applicants will be applying to other unis that may be interested in those things so aren't going to prejudice personal statements that mention them, but if you spend the majority of it writing about your music background they're just going to wonder why you didn't apply to music if anything. Certainly I wouldn't suggest bringing it up in an interview as that would be sort of besides the point of reasoning about the particular problem or question posed to you, which undoubtedly is not going to be related to music specifically (or if it is, only in a very superficial way e.g. some legal problem about someone playing loud music or something maybe).

Oxford consider GCSEs a fair bit (although also have the LNAT to consider), although normally they are focused on your overall grade profile, rather than individual subjects and grades gotten in individual subjects (except maybe English language and maths). Cambridge do not put a great deal of weight on them however. Note both consider grade 8 and grade 9 at GCSE as the same and equivalent to the old A* grade.

Your proposed A-levels are all (or mostly) traditionally academic subjects, so you are neither going to be helped or hindered by those. Music won't be seen as particularly better or worse than any other A-level by Oxbridge (it should be noted that for several departments at LSE however, including I believe law, it would be considered as a "non-preferred" subject).

Also it's far too early to be deciding what "kind" of lawyer you want to be later, especially as you've never studied law and have no idea what it would be like to either study or practice in that area of law. Indicating an interest in some area of law is fine (provided it's supported by relevant wider reading to evidence that interest and you aren't just writing that you are interested in something and hoping they believe that), but I would definitely not go about telling them you want to be a human rights lawyer in interview or in your personal statement. It just seems glib and makes it seem more like you're interested in the idea of some apparently prestigious career than any actual substantive interest in the subject and nature of the work.

(Original post by pricklyhedgehog)
Alright thank you, that was very helpful. I have a family friend who was accepted into Oxford a few years ago. Apparently during the interview they were particularly impressed with her music grades (two grade 8s), hence why I asked about whether it matters or not. I mean obviously it is irrelevant to Law but apparently they like to see what other interests you have and how determined you are. I mean obviously the most important factor is good grades and showing large amounts of wider reading into the subject you want to do, but I mean I don’t even think Oxbridge would be for me even if I did get in! Also, apparently Music A Level is considered a ‘harder’ subject - or from what I’ve heard it is considered an essay based subject and Universities regard it highly, but I’m not sure whether this still applies from an Oxbridge perspective! And yes I’m going into further reading of law - again I’m really unsure about everything at the moment, I have slight dyslexia and I hate reading so I’ve been told it would be very determined of me if I did pursue a law career!
Were they applying to law, or to music? I would be quite surprised if an interviewer for law would care about or even bring up music grades, because it just seems like a waste of their time and of the interviewees to be discussing that, except maybe very briefly as an icebreaker. They have a fair bit they want to figure out from the interview about the applicant, and spending that time talking about something which doesn't really tell them anything about the applicants ability in this subject area (law) seems wasteful. Obviously if they were applying to music it would be very relevant of course though.

The interviews are not, as I understand, normally that long. In that time they want to gauge how well the applicant will fare in the Oxbridge tutorial/supervision format, by having them discuss their reasoning and approaches to unfamiliar problems. Generally my understanding is the interviews are sort of a "mock" tutorial, and essentially just an academic discussion between the applicant and the admissions tutors where they are trying to see how "teachable" you are in that format. How well one can play an instrument does not, as indicated, tell the admissions tutor how well you can learn in the Oxbridge tutorial environment, nor how well you can grapple with legal problem solving and reasoning. It does indicate some level of personal commitment and dedication which is generally a useful transferable skill, but they will be sort of assuming that of all applicants I imagine and want to see more specific commitment to the subject area in the personal statement etc.
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pricklyhedgehog
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Irrelevant extracurricular activities are not normally really considered by Oxford and Cambridge (although may be considered by other unis). So your music activities are not really going to be of enormous interest if you aren't applying to music, for those two unis. They are mainly going to be looking at your general academic abilities and critical reasoning skills. How well you can play X instrument doesn't tell them how good you are at writing essays about legal problems.

They realise of course applicants will be applying to other unis that may be interested in those things so aren't going to prejudice personal statements that mention them, but if you spend the majority of it writing about your music background they're just going to wonder why you didn't apply to music if anything. Certainly I wouldn't suggest bringing it up in an interview as that would be sort of besides the point of reasoning about the particular problem or question posed to you, which undoubtedly is not going to be related to music specifically (or if it is, only in a very superficial way e.g. some legal problem about someone playing loud music or something maybe).

Oxford consider GCSEs a fair bit (although also have the LNAT to consider), although normally they are focused on your overall grade profile, rather than individual subjects and grades gotten in individual subjects (except maybe English language and maths). Cambridge do not put a great deal of weight on them however. Note both consider grade 8 and grade 9 at GCSE as the same and equivalent to the old A* grade.

Your proposed A-levels are all (or mostly) traditionally academic subjects, so you are neither going to be helped or hindered by those. Music won't be seen as particularly better or worse than any other A-level by Oxbridge (it should be noted that for several departments at LSE however, including I believe law, it would be considered as a "non-preferred" subject).

Also it's far too early to be deciding what "kind" of lawyer you want to be later, especially as you've never studied law and have no idea what it would be like to either study or practice in that area of law. Indicating an interest in some area of law is fine (provided it's supported by relevant wider reading to evidence that interest and you aren't just writing that you are interested in something and hoping they believe that), but I would definitely not go about telling them you want to be a human rights lawyer in interview or in your personal statement. It just seems glib and makes it seem more like you're interested in the idea of some apparently prestigious career than any actual substantive interest in the subject and nature of the work.



Were they applying to law, or to music? I would be quite surprised if an interviewer for law would care about or even bring up music grades, because it just seems like a waste of their time and of the interviewees to be discussing that, except maybe very briefly as an icebreaker. They have a fair bit they want to figure out from the interview about the applicant, and spending that time talking about something which doesn't really tell them anything about the applicants ability in this subject area (law) seems wasteful. Obviously if they were applying to music it would be very relevant of course though.

The interviews are not, as I understand, normally that long. In that time they want to gauge how well the applicant will fare in the Oxbridge tutorial/supervision format, by having them discuss their reasoning and approaches to unfamiliar problems. Generally my understanding is the interviews are sort of a "mock" tutorial, and essentially just an academic discussion between the applicant and the admissions tutors where they are trying to see how "teachable" you are in that format. How well one can play an instrument does not, as indicated, tell the admissions tutor how well you can learn in the Oxbridge tutorial environment, nor how well you can grapple with legal problem solving and reasoning. It does indicate some level of personal commitment and dedication which is generally a useful transferable skill, but they will be sort of assuming that of all applicants I imagine and want to see more specific commitment to the subject area in the personal statement etc.
They were applying for chemistry and got in! She did have excellent A Level and GCSE results, so I suppose the music grades were a cherry on top. I think it shows a level of personal commitment, many people do not get anywhere close to achieving two Grade 8s in instruments on top of As and A*s at GCSE and A Level and she did put a LOT of the time any teenager would usually spend playing videogames or hanging out with friends, into her instruments. From her experience, they wanted to know about who she is as a person as well as her academic grades written on paper - again as you mentioned, how ‘teachable’ she is. Obviously I get your point ‘How well one can play an instrument does not, as indicated, tell the admissions tutor how well you can learn in the Oxbridge tutorial environment’ but from just doing one Grade 8, I can tell you the amount of time and effort it takes to get there and for someone to achieve not one, but two distinction grade 8s, as well as getting perfect academic grades? - it’s rare. I might be a little bias since I have a grade 8 myself which took 9 years to achieve, and obviously it wouldn’t have any sort of relevance towards my future law career, but they do like to know a bit about your other hobbies (from what I’ve heard). I just wanted to hear something from an actual Oxbridge student and what their experience is like - I probably won’t end up applying there even if I did have the grades! I’m just curious!
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by pricklyhedgehog)
They were applying for chemistry and got in! She did have excellent A Level and GCSE results, so I suppose the music grades were a cherry on top. I think it shows a level of personal commitment, many people do not get anywhere close to achieving two Grade 8s in instruments on top of As and A*s at GCSE and A Level and she did put a LOT of the time any teenager would usually spend playing videogames or hanging out with friends, into her instruments. From her experience, they wanted to know about who she is as a person as well as her academic grades written on paper - again as you mentioned, how ‘teachable’ she is. Obviously I get your point ‘How well one can play an instrument does not, as indicated, tell the admissions tutor how well you can learn in the Oxbridge tutorial environment’ but from just doing one Grade 8, I can tell you the amount of time and effort it takes to get there and for someone to achieve not one, but two distinction grade 8s, as well as getting perfect academic grades? - it’s rare. I might be a little bias since I have a grade 8 myself which took 9 years to achieve, and obviously it wouldn’t have any sort of relevance towards my future law career, but they do like to know a bit about your other hobbies (from what I’ve heard). I just wanted to hear something from an actual Oxbridge student and what their experience is like - I probably won’t end up applying there even if I did have the grades! I’m just curious!
Well I am not an Oxbridge student, but I have seen in interviews with admissions tutors (and references to this from the official reps on TSR from the Oxbridge colleges) that ABSRM qualifications are not really considered specifically if you aren't applying to music. Similar arguments can be made for other things (such as sporting activities etc), with perhaps an exception for medicine or vet med if it exhibits some leadership qualities through the activity.

See for example this article: https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...ns-really-work, especially 'There is far less interest than is popularly thought in extra-curricular activity. An academic remarks with bafflement that a candidate has "got his violin grades on there".' The article is from 2012 but I don't think the perspective has changed signifcantly; see also this page from Jesus College, Cambridge, about the requirements for studying maths: https://www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/subjects/mathematics, particularly 'To be offered a place at Jesus you'll need to be very good at mathematics, passionate about the subject, and willing to work hard. It doesn't matter at all what background, school, or college you come from, or whether you play tennis or the violin.' (emphasis mine).

In any case, whether you do well in GCSE or not, one or both will still be an option; if you do more poorly in GCSEs, but do very well in your A-levels, then Cambridge is certainly an option, and if you do well in GCSEs either is a potential option. Note that both Oxford and Cambridge are statistically easier to get into than some other law courses (such as LSE), although this may be in part due to self selection of applicants deciding they aren't "Oxbridge material" without letting the admissions tutors make that decision, or ruling the option out for other (usually non-applicable or incorrect) reasons or assumptions. Also if someone did poorly in their GCSEs but was only predicted AAA then they would probably not make a strong applicant for either, as Cambridge requires A*AA and Oxford puts a fair emphasis on GCSE grades, however (although LSE has similar requirements to Cambridge, although puts probably a little more emphasis on GCSEs and undoubtedly a lot more emphasis on the personal statement).
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(Original post by pricklyhedgehog)
I’m currently GCSE student, going onto A-Level in September. I’m thinking about my future or what possible careers/degrees I could take...I’m just very curious - how hard is it to get into an Oxbridge University?
I (might be) taking maths, physics and music A-Levels in September, and what grades would I need to get a place for Law at Oxbridge? I’ve taken my Grade 8 piano, got a distinction and I’m working towards DipABRSM on top of my studies. I’m also working towards my Grade 8 in music theory. My GCSE mocks were mainly all 7s, 8s and 9s (except for a 5 in Spanish and 6 in Chemistry oop). I’m very passionate in Law and considering becoming a Human Rights Lawyer when I’m older. I’d just like a very honest opinion about how hard it really is to get in. I don’t attend a private school, and I heard a very large percentage of Oxbridge students attended some of the top private schools!
Those who got into Oxbridge, what did your grades look like and what is it like studying there? Do extra-curriculars helps, like musical instruments?
Hi!

I think one of the first things you need to consider is how competitive Law in general is, let alone Law at Oxbridge. At Oxford, there are 8.4 applicants per place for Law, and at Cambridge it's 6.7. That, in the crudest way possible, means you have to out-compete upwards of 6 people to get a place to read Law at Oxbridge, in your academic profile, personal statement, LNAT and Interview, as well as the references given by your 6th form/College.

As well as this, none of the subjects you are planning to take for A-level are entirely essay based, which would be quite off putting for Oxbridge. I'm not suggesting that you change to 3 essay based subjects, but you certainly need to be doing at least 1, as without this Oxbridge may not believe that you have the academic capabilities to do well on their course, as your essay skills wouldn't be strong enough. As for grades, a Freedom of Information request from 2017 uncovered that for the 2017 admissions cycle for Oxford, the average number of GCSE A*s (8/9s) for successful Law applicants was 7.76, with the average number of GCSE Cs (4/5s) being 0.08, with the majority of applicants achieving exclusively A*s and As, with some Bs. Furthermore, you would be required to sit the LNAT, and the score you get on this can dramatically affect your chances of being offered a place.

So overall, your GCSEs would likely be okay for Oxbridge, but only if you could show strong academic capabilities, specifically in essay based subjects at A-level, and unfortunately your current A-level options just wouldn't demonstrate that. It is also very likely that as you would not be studying any essay based subjects, your 6th form/college wouldn't support your application to read Law as they have a lot of extra admin they have to do, especially with the admissions tests and extra references and written work required, so would likely not support your application, as your chance of being successful is very low if you're not studying an essay based subject, or two such as History, Law, Politics, Philosophy, English Literature etc.

That isn't meant to come across as telling you to give up! I just want to give you genuine advice because if Law is really what you want to do, you may find many doors slammed shut due to your A-level options.
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my friend got into cambridge
her stats 9999999998
a*a*a or something
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Hi!

I think one of the first things you need to consider is how competitive Law in general is, let alone Law at Oxbridge. At Oxford, there are 8.4 applicants per place for Law, and at Cambridge it's 6.7. That, in the crudest way possible, means you have to out-compete upwards of 6 people to get a place to read Law at Oxbridge, in your academic profile, personal statement, LNAT and Interview, as well as the references given by your 6th form/College.

As well as this, none of the subjects you are planning to take for A-level are entirely essay based, which would be quite off putting for Oxbridge. I'm not suggesting that you change to 3 essay based subjects, but you certainly need to be doing at least 1, as without this Oxbridge may not believe that you have the academic capabilities to do well on their course, as your essay skills wouldn't be strong enough. As for grades, a Freedom of Information request from 2017 uncovered that for the 2017 admissions cycle for Oxford, the average number of GCSE A*s (8/9s) for successful Law applicants was 7.76, with the average number of GCSE Cs (4/5s) being 0.08, with the majority of applicants achieving exclusively A*s and As, with some Bs. Furthermore, you would be required to sit the LNAT, and the score you get on this can dramatically affect your chances of being offered a place.

So overall, your GCSEs would likely be okay for Oxbridge, but only if you could show strong academic capabilities, specifically in essay based subjects at A-level, and unfortunately your current A-level options just wouldn't demonstrate that. It is also very likely that as you would not be studying any essay based subjects, your 6th form/college wouldn't support your application to read Law as they have a lot of extra admin they have to do, especially with the admissions tests and extra references and written work required, so would likely not support your application, as your chance of being successful is very low if you're not studying an essay based subject, or two such as History, Law, Politics, Philosophy, English Literature etc.

That isn't meant to come across as telling you to give up! I just want to give you genuine advice because if Law is really what you want to do, you may find many doors slammed shut due to your A-level options.
Hi thanks for your reply! Yeah it’s difficult for me to choose my options (I have until August to decide) because I’m stuck with a few different career options. I’ve always been told I have a very mathematical brain, but I am also good in essay-based subjects. I was told by both my English and Maths teachers that I’m top of the class, and in top sets in both! I haven’t always wanted to be a lawyer, I feel like if I pursued my mathematical abilities, I’d want to get into finance, business and engineering (hence why I want to do maths and physics). I’ve also been told music is considered an essay-based subject but I’m not very sure on that!
I was told by my school about a year and a half ago that I have slight reading difficulties and so I have extra time in exams now. This is why I’m a bit hesitant in pursuing a more essay-based career, even though I did get 9s in English Lit/Lang. I’ve always found it quite difficult reading, but in regards to analyzing things, writing etc. - those are my speciality! I enjoy most of my subjects in school and I’m mostly getting good grades. The problem is, if I do want to pursue a more mathematical path (engineering etc.) I’d really have to have taken maths and physics. But if I wanted to do law for example, I could still take it with my A Levels, just maybe not at Oxbridge, which I’m fine with! I’ve been looking into either psychology or history instead of music, but again I’m very hesitant! Music A Level is around 60% practical (I think) and I’ll be fine with that, so I could use that time to focus on getting very top grades in maths and physics. I’d rather do maths, physics and music and get As and A*s, rather than do a harder subject which would bring down all my grades. I’m quite slow in reading but do you think this would put me at a disadvantage, if say I did do history/psychology? Would this put me at a disadvantage for law as well?
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pricklyhedgehog
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#15
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(Original post by 1hhh)
my friend got into cambridge
her stats 9999999998
a*a*a or something
Wow. Did they go to a private school or something, those grades are astonishing! What are they studying?
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starinthenight
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(Original post by pricklyhedgehog)
Wow. Did they go to a private school or something, those grades are astonishing! What are they studying?
nah she went to camp hill girls grammar school
she got into law this year as in got an offer for 2021 entry
for a levels i think she took eng lit history psychology?? i might be wrong
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pricklyhedgehog
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(Original post by 1hhh)
nah she went to camp hill girls grammar school
she got into law this year as in got an offer for 2021 entry
for a levels i think she took eng lit history psychology?? i might be wrong
Wow that’s amazing! Congrats to her! 👏
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Feelingbored
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I have a Cambridge offer for History

My best advice would be to express passion for your subject by reading books and attending lectures

Good luck
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sarahpledgelord
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Planning to start Classics at Cambridge this year if A levely things go to plan (:
Your grades sound defo good enough, but maybe consider taking another essay based subject for as/ a level if u can? I'm not totally sure but I think that is considered desirable for law applicants. Also there's many excellent law essay writing competitions, if that hasn't been mentioned yet
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pricklyhedgehog
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(Original post by sarahpledgelord)
Planning to start Classics at Cambridge this year if A levely things go to plan (:
Your grades sound defo good enough, but maybe consider taking another essay based subject for as/ a level if u can? I'm not totally sure but I think that is considered desirable for law applicants. Also there's many excellent law essay writing competitions, if that hasn't been mentioned yet
Hiya thanks for the reply, and congrats that’s amazing! I just got my most recent mock results back and I got 8x 8s/9s. I got a 7 in maths which is less than I hoped but I got 9s in all the essay written subjects that I take. The thing is I’m stuck between potentially doing something in engineering or law, and therefore I really have no idea what A-Levels to take now. I’ve been working really hard in maths and got a 7, but I didn’t even learn any quotes or revise at all for English lit/lang and I got 9s. I’m really unsure on what to do in September…I think I’ll go to the careers adviser! Instead of music I’ve been considering sociology or politics but again I’m not really sure. Well done though, I really admire you for getting into Cambridge - hope your A-Levels go well!
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