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Degrees

Hi All,

I'm currently doing a-levels in geography geology and biology.

I'm trying to nail down what i want to do after college as I know i'd quite like to go to university.

My main points of interest are geography and geology and specifically the side of natural hazards and tectonic movement and hazards related to that.

Have any of you had to decode between a geography and geology degree and what made you choose what you did and where you are doing it.

Thanks - Harry :smile:
Natural hazards and plate tectonics pretty squarely fall in the geology area as far as I'm aware, so if that's your main interest I'd suggest looking into those kinds of courses (geology, earth sciences etc) primarily. Geography will include a lot of social/human geography elements relating to development, sustainability, demography and so on by comparison.
Reply 2
Original post by artful_lounger
Natural hazards and plate tectonics pretty squarely fall in the geology area as far as I'm aware, so if that's your main interest I'd suggest looking into those kinds of courses (geology, earth sciences etc) primarily. Geography will include a lot of social/human geography elements relating to development, sustainability, demography and so on by comparison.

That's what I was thinking, thank you for your reply!
Original post by harryw17
Hi All,

I'm currently doing a-levels in geography geology and biology.

I'm trying to nail down what i want to do after college as I know i'd quite like to go to university.

My main points of interest are geography and geology and specifically the side of natural hazards and tectonic movement and hazards related to that.

Have any of you had to decode between a geography and geology degree and what made you choose what you did and where you are doing it.

Thanks - Harry :smile:


Hey!

I’m Oliver and am currently a third year in natural sciences at Lancaster university.

If you are struggling to decide between different degree subjects I would definitely recommend natural sciences as a great flexible option allowing you to study more that one science.

Each uni will do natural sciences a bit differently but at Lancaster we have a pathway system where you can choose three pathways across all branches of chemistry, physics, maths, biology, earth science and geography just to name a few. The full list of pathways and entry requirements for Lancaster can be found here: https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/natural-sciences/

There is also the option to alter you pathway choices as you progress through your degree. For me (I do chemistry and biochem) this was extremely valuable as I was able to drop my physical chemistry pathway after first year to allow for a greater focus on biochemistry.

One of the best things about natural sciences is the vast range of experiences you get and people
you meet. Since you study alongside the single honours students across multiple departments, you
get to see so many more faces and there is never a lonely lecture. It’s also great to see how all the
different sciences interlink and you can often apply something you learnt in one subject to one of
your other pathways which is fascinating!

Hope that is helpful and best of luck with your decision :smile: Feel free to ask me any other questions if you have any.

Oliver (Student Ambassador)

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