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joint honours degrees

is a degree like law for example taught with spanish or another modern language a separate degree from just law of the uni says that languages is an integrated part of the law degree - are just law and law with a language separate courses that one can get into ?
Reply 1
Can you provide links to the courses you are referring to?
sure https://www.gla.ac.uk/undergraduate/degrees/commonlaw/#programmestructure
in the program structure bit it says law with languages and says that it’s an integrated part of the degree program
Original post by fefhghjhbdsxcc
is a degree like law for example taught with spanish or another modern language a separate degree from just law of the uni says that languages is an integrated part of the law degree - are just law and law with a language separate courses that one can get into ?

Law can be taught with a language like Arabic, Mandarin etc at SOAS and that means your degree would become a joint degree of Law and the language you choose. Therefore, you'll have the same number of credits and modules in your law programme and your language programme. Hope this helps!
Original post by fefhghjhbdsxcc
is a degree like law for example taught with spanish or another modern language a separate degree from just law of the uni says that languages is an integrated part of the law degree - are just law and law with a language separate courses that one can get into ?

Hi @fefhghjhbdsxcc,

It really depends on the university that you are studying at. Usually a joint honours degree (where you do law and a language in equal measure the entire way through the degree) is a different degree to just a straight law degree. So, for example, if you studied French and Law you would graduate with a degree in French and Law (this is still one degree but has a different name indicating it was in 2 subjects). Some universities offer the chance to do optional modules across academic schools. So, for example, you could do a straight law degree but choose one French module per term. If you were to do this you would either get a degree that was just a straight law degree (and your module breakdown would show French) or you would get a degree called Law with an elective in French (or something similar). I understand that this probably isn't all that clear but I would recommend speaking to your university (or the university you are interested in) directly so that they can explain what they can offer you and what it would mean for your end degree title.

I hope this helps and good luck!

Sophie 🙂

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