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Best way to revise A Level OCR History and Ancient History

What is the best way to revise for Ancient History and History because I'm struggling
Reply 1
*just some general ideas*

colour code different themes everywhere you use them - battles, people, economics, politics etc
- essay plans - find past paper questions and ask your teachers for sample questions (find questions you've done previously and re-plan them as well)
- put as much detail in them initially
- then start writing them from memory
- you'll find there will be lots of overlap - but keep writing everything so that it becomes imprinted in your memory
- start timing yourself - give yourself however long you give yourself in exams to practice the conditions - 5-10 mins
- write essays
- ask your teacher to mark them
- do in exams conditions and timings
- timelines
- do this in three columns - date -- event -- explanation of what the impact/significance etc of that event was - this helps your analysis in essays. this means that the timelines are worthwhile and you actually get something from making and looking at
- collaborate with your friends, ask what they do and do things together
Reply 2
Original post by tash_c1ark
*just some general ideas*

colour code different themes everywhere you use them - battles, people, economics, politics etc
- essay plans - find past paper questions and ask your teachers for sample questions (find questions you've done previously and re-plan them as well)
- put as much detail in them initially
- then start writing them from memory
- you'll find there will be lots of overlap - but keep writing everything so that it becomes imprinted in your memory
- start timing yourself - give yourself however long you give yourself in exams to practice the conditions - 5-10 mins
- write essays
- ask your teacher to mark them
- do in exams conditions and timings
- timelines
- do this in three columns - date -- event -- explanation of what the impact/significance etc of that event was - this helps your analysis in essays. this means that the timelines are worthwhile and you actually get something from making and looking at
- collaborate with your friends, ask what they do and do things together

Thanks that all makes sense😁
Some good advice above but I'll just add one thing.

For my Ancient Hist A level, and later with Early Mediaeval history stuff at uni, i.e. courses where you have to remember lots of specific sources, I always found it really useful to make a tables dedicated to the sources.
There's a couple of ways I would do that. I would either list all the sources and then make a new row for each person/event they discuss (e.g. The reign of Emperor Augustus), with separate columns for:
- The general overview/opinion/point (e.g. Augustus was a good ruler, he built bridges, etc.)
- Any specific quotes
- Essay titles/topics they would be useful for
- Other sources that agree/disagree

Or I would organise it by having a different table for each person/event, with each source as a new row, including all the same information.

Which is better generally depended on the way the course/essays was structured and whether it was a source which covers loads of people/events (like 12 Caesars) or a source which covered one specific topic.

I would always colour code these too, either by person/event or by source.

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