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physics ALEVEL HELP

Hi, I'm studying alevel edexcel Physics and I've been getting around 60% in my interim tests, I'm aiming for an A* (want to study engineering), what can I do over the summer to get there?

I'm kinda confused as I usually review with notes and youtube vids and do a bunch of PMT qs, why can't I seem to "hack it" even though I work hard
Reply 1
Yo, I actually did IB physics HL, which isn't exactly the same but I think I might be able to help a bit?

General advice for all STEM subjects is to check what you're getting wrong. Is it a common mistake? Such as being unable to connect the dots in a derivation and being unable to finish it, simply not understanding how to apply your knowledge to a question (AKA you check the markscheme and think you COULD'VE did what it wanted you to do but you just didn't think of it while doing the question) or simply not having the knowledge required to do the question in a topic. Knowing what problems are commonly losing you a part of that 40% allows you to target those problems and hopefully overcome them.

Targetting specific problems is normally the key to getting better if simply "learning more" or "understanding better" isn't enough (as exams are really just testing how well you can complete a task they give you rather than testing your knowledge on a topic/subject, though knowledge is required to reach that point).

Hopefully someone doing A level physics can correct me if I'm tweaking though lol
Original post by oradion
Yo, I actually did IB physics HL, which isn't exactly the same but I think I might be able to help a bit?

General advice for all STEM subjects is to check what you're getting wrong. Is it a common mistake? Such as being unable to connect the dots in a derivation and being unable to finish it, simply not understanding how to apply your knowledge to a question (AKA you check the markscheme and think you COULD'VE did what it wanted you to do but you just didn't think of it while doing the question) or simply not having the knowledge required to do the question in a topic. Knowing what problems are commonly losing you a part of that 40% allows you to target those problems and hopefully overcome them.

Targetting specific problems is normally the key to getting better if simply "learning more" or "understanding better" isn't enough (as exams are really just testing how well you can complete a task they give you rather than testing your knowledge on a topic/subject, though knowledge is required to reach that point).

Hopefully someone doing A level physics can correct me if I'm tweaking though lol


Ah i see what you mean! The usual issue is I can't apply my knowledge at the time or the mark scheme is so specific (I had the right idea but in the wrong words).
Any advice or resources for this? I'm considering trying the uplearn course but I'm just unsure because I reckon if I can fix this problem I could easily be accessing 80%
Reply 3
Original post by spacedout444
Ah i see what you mean! The usual issue is I can't apply my knowledge at the time or the mark scheme is so specific (I had the right idea but in the wrong words).
Any advice or resources for this? I'm considering trying the uplearn course but I'm just unsure because I reckon if I can fix this problem I could easily be accessing 80%

If school hasn't ended for you yet, then asking your teacher about those two issues is probably the best thing you can do for yourself right now. Assuming you go to a half decent school, your teacher is an expert in physics that has learnt your course to the point where they can teach you - they would (well, should) know how to best go about fixing these mistakes.

I'm ill-suited to giving advice on A level physics because I'm not sure how similar the question papers are to IB HL physics, but if they're as similar as I'm thinking then doing more and more questions is the only answer. However, make sure you ALWAYS understand the markscheme and why they did what they did if your problem is application of knowledge. Even if it feels like you understand 95% of the markscheme but don't know where a random number came from, look for that 5% as it may be crucial to the logic and thinking that created the other 95%. Even better if you redo questions that you failed in the past in order to make sure you've digested how you're meant to do said question.
In terms of markschemes being specific, do you have an example? Sometimes markschemes give an answer but the answer isn't absolute and if what you say implies what the markscheme says then the examiner may give you marks.

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