The Student Room Group
Student at the Open University
Open University
Milton Keynes

How to be a counsellor with OU degree

https://www.open.ac.uk/courses/counselling/degrees/bsc-psychology-with-counselling-q84

can i become a counsellor with the OU degree? im going to do part-time as ill be getting a job with ryanair as cabin crew . once i get my degree, i want to do it as a side business and hopefully have the business as my own. so then i can makw it flexible with me working as cabin crew and then switch to full-time as a counsellor if it all works well.
how do i do this?
Reply 1
The "Careers" section on that page gives you a starting point:

"Please note that this psychology degree with a specialism in counselling theory does not qualify you to practise as a counsellor, psychotherapist or counselling or clinical psychologist. To work therapeutically with clients requires further training for which this degree is excellent preparation. For example:

Counselling psychology is a branch of chartered psychology with its own training route. The first step is a BPS-accredited psychology degree like this one.

Counselling if you are interested in a career in this area you will need to do professional training in counselling with practice-based elements. In partnership with the Counselling and Psychotherapy Central Awarding Body (CPCAB) we offer a Diploma of Higher Education in Counselling (W09) and a Foundation Degree in Counselling (X09)."
Student at the Open University
Open University
Milton Keynes
Reply 2
Original post by pmd_qwe
The "Careers" section on that page gives you a starting point:

"Please note that this psychology degree with a specialism in counselling theory does not qualify you to practise as a counsellor, psychotherapist or counselling or clinical psychologist. To work therapeutically with clients requires further training for which this degree is excellent preparation. For example:

Counselling psychology is a branch of chartered psychology with its own training route. The first step is a BPS-accredited psychology degree like this one.

Counselling if you are interested in a career in this area you will need to do professional training in counselling with practice-based elements. In partnership with the Counselling and Psychotherapy Central Awarding Body (CPCAB) we offer a Diploma of Higher Education in Counselling (W09) and a Foundation Degree in Counselling (X09)."

hi, so the degree doesn’t allow it? would i need to complete the higher education and the foundation degree instead?
im clueless on how to do it😭😭
Reply 3
bump
Reply 4
Original post by Anonymous
hi, so the degree doesn’t allow it? would i need to complete the higher education and the foundation degree instead?
im clueless on how to do it😭😭

I don't know anything about counselling so I can't advise further, but the general impression I get is that it's a highly competitive career with very specific and elaborate qualification/certification requirements. You should probably find whatever professional body covers counselling in the UK and follow their recommendations, and/or contact the OU and ask whether any of their qualifications are a good fit for your goals.
Reply 5
Original post by Anonymous
hi, so the degree doesn’t allow it? would i need to complete the higher education and the foundation degree instead?
im clueless on how to do it😭😭


Hi!

I did my degree in Psychology with Counselling with the OU and then went on to train as a counsellor. To become a counsellor, you need to take professional training. The degree the OU offers is an academic course, so would not allow you to register as a counsellor. You do not need a degree to practice as a counsellor. I completed a level 3 counselling skills certificate, followed by a level 4 counselling diploma at a local college in order to qualify. These were both part-time and took 3 academic years in total. These courses involve skills practice and a professional placement, which the OU course does not include. This could be a more appropriate route for you if you are looking to become a counsellor.
Reply 6
I do agree , as I learnt this most recently. I was a student with the Open University OU. I will say that not many people regard studying online as a genuine course. But, It was worth it if only to build on on your CV. I realised that studying with the OU to become a counsellor /therapist would not be ideal. I also learnt that you can call yourself a counsellor without being qualify. But I doubt that you would gain much of an income. To qualify as a counsellor/ therapist, I would need to enrol on a academic course, I would rather sign up for the Student England Student Loan. The OU route to become a counsellor would take much longer to qualify. With the OU, to apply for the route to become a counsellor/therapist, you cannot gain a student loan as you would also need to enrolled with a private course provider called the CPCAB. With the CPCAB, you would need to take out a loan or may if you are eligible, apply for a loan. But the down side is, you have to pay it all back after you complete the course or during the course duration. Totally different with the Student Loan. Also, to become a credited counsellor with the British Association for Counselling and psychotherapy (BACP) , you would need to attend a class based course and not online. See their criteria
Original post by pmd_qwe
The "Careers" section on that page gives you a starting point:

"Please note that this psychology degree with a specialism in counselling theory does not qualify you to practise as a counsellor, psychotherapist or counselling or clinical psychologist. To work therapeutically with clients requires further training for which this degree is excellent preparation. For example:

Counselling psychology is a branch of chartered psychology with its own training route. The first step is a BPS-accredited psychology degree like this one.

Counselling if you are interested in a career in this area you will need to do professional training in counselling with practice-based elements. In partnership with the Counselling and Psychotherapy Central Awarding Body (CPCAB) we offer a Diploma of Higher Education in Counselling (W09) and a Foundation Degree in Counselling (X09)."

That is not actually correct. Counsellors are not statutory regulated, meaning anyone can set themselves up and call themselves a counsellor without any qualifications at all. Psychotherapists and clinical psychologists do need further training, but this degree is more than sufficient if you wish to be a counsellor.
Original post by hippieglitter
That is not actually correct. Counsellors are not statutory regulated, meaning anyone can set themselves up and call themselves a counsellor without any qualifications at all. Psychotherapists and clinical psychologists do need further training, but this degree is more than sufficient if you wish to be a counsellor.

Whether someone can call themself a Counsellor and actually be a Counsellor (as in be qualifed and competent) are two completely different things. The degree above will not be sufficient in any way, as the individual will need lengthy practical training. Counselling while not regulated as a protected title, is generally governed through accredited bodies like the BACP, so this will the minimum for most Counsellors.

Greg

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