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Which book should I compare The Bloody Chamber to?

For my English Lit NEA, we have to compare one pre-1900 novel to Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber. We have the options of Northanger Abbey, The Woman in White, A Dolls House, Frankenstein, Dracula, The Castle of Otranto, and Wuthering Heights. We are allowed to pick a different novel if it fits but these are the recommended ones. Which do you guys think fits the best?
Hey henryviiienjoyer! It really depends what you're looking to compare within the two texts - could you maybe give us some idea of what kind of stuff in The Bloody Chamber you'd like to explore in an essay?
Original post by Castrovalva
Hey henryviiienjoyer! It really depends what you're looking to compare within the two texts - could you maybe give us some idea of what kind of stuff in The Bloody Chamber you'd like to explore in an essay?

hey, i think we get to choose any topic to compare, but it's recommended that we do something on feminism/female agency as that's a big theme in TBC
In that case, (obviously) they all have something you could say about feminism/female agency, but I'd maybe check a couple out and see what you think. The first texts which come to mind are Wuthering Heights/Northanger Abbey/Frankenstein both written by female authors yet arguably male-focused in their plots/executions (which is particularly interesting when you look at how WH has a few female protagonists). Personally, though it's a good text, Dracula has a clear lack of feminism/female characters, which can have a decent essay argument, but it's not easy and definitely not for everyone, so I'd probably avoid it unless you're looking for a challenge. I should add I've not read The Castle of Otranto, so I can't comment there! The Woman in White is also pretty good and very gothic - written by a woman, and also very suspenseful. If you're looking for a non-mentioned text, Jane Eyre would be VERY good to look at. It has a lot to say about 18th/19th Century feminism and also has some really interesting stuff on female hysteria - I once wrote an essay on Bertha (aka "the mad woman in the attic" - if you're familiar with this trope, JE is where it comes from!) and how arguably she set back literary feminism despite being written by a female author with a female protagonist - I wish I still had it to share!

Hope this helps :smile:

EDIT: Just realised I never mentioned A Doll('s) House (the title depends who you ask) - I think it's a really good, enjoyable play which is definitely one of the 19th Century's strongest examples of feminism in the arts, especially with its tragic focus. Also, it's not really too gothic (like the romantics; Eyre, Heights, Northanger, etc.) so it has a big advantage of showing feminism from another direction. Also, it's a play, which means you can assess different execution styles, too!
(edited 7 months ago)
Original post by Castrovalva
In that case, (obviously) they all have something you could say about feminism/female agency, but I'd maybe check a couple out and see what you think. The first texts which come to mind are Wuthering Heights/Northanger Abbey/Frankenstein both written by female authors yet arguably male-focused in their plots/executions (which is particularly interesting when you look at how WH has a few female protagonists). Personally, though it's a good text, Dracula has a clear lack of feminism/female characters, which can have a decent essay argument, but it's not easy and definitely not for everyone, so I'd probably avoid it unless you're looking for a challenge. I should add I've not read The Castle of Otranto, so I can't comment there! The Woman in White is also pretty good and very gothic - written by a woman, and also very suspenseful. If you're looking for a non-mentioned text, Jane Eyre would be VERY good to look at. It has a lot to say about 18th/19th Century feminism and also has some really interesting stuff on female hysteria - I once wrote an essay on Bertha (aka "the mad woman in the attic" - if you're familiar with this trope, JE is where it comes from!) and how arguably she set back literary feminism despite being written by a female author with a female protagonist - I wish I still had it to share!

Hope this helps :smile:

EDIT: Just realised I never mentioned A Doll('s) House (the title depends who you ask) - I think it's a really good, enjoyable play which is definitely one of the 19th Century's strongest examples of feminism in the arts, especially with its tragic focus. Also, it's not really too gothic (like the romantics; Eyre, Heights, Northanger, etc.) so it has a big advantage of showing feminism from another direction. Also, it's a play, which means you can assess different execution styles, too!


this is great, thank you so much!

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