The Student Room Group

getting into Oxford

what would you say is ur top tip to get into Oxford ( apart from grades)
Original post by spam44
what would you say is ur top tip to get into Oxford ( apart from grades)

Depends on the subject.

Make sure your interview technique is good and that you are prepared for any entrance exams, for starters.

Also, check out the admissions criteria for whichever subject you are applying for.
Reply 2
Original post by TypicalNerd
Depends on the subject.

Make sure your interview technique is good and that you are prepared for any entrance exams, for starters.

Also, check out the admissions criteria for whichever subject you are applying for.


my subject would be law :smile:
I dont know if theres anything that could make my application stand out apart from grades yk?
Reply 3
Original post by spam44
my subject would be law :smile:
I dont know if theres anything that could make my application stand out apart from grades yk?


What reading have you done? How can you show passion and suitability in your PS?
Reply 4
Original post by Muttley79
What reading have you done? How can you show passion and suitability in your PS?


ive ordered "letter to a law student" which was recommended by a lot of people. in my PS I can show passion and involvement in the subject through my supercurriculars , ive competed on national level in debates, (I was told this could be relevant ) ive given a ted talk which was posted on the official ted x channel wiht 38 millions subscriber (also told it could prove my public speaking ability) im helping a legal team to finalise the paperwork for the construction of an orphanage in Cameroon and im taking a MOOC law Course by Harvard.

im not too sure these are relevant since some tell me that its pointless while others tell me that I shoudl mention them
(edited 10 months ago)
Original post by spam44
my subject would be law :smile:
I dont know if theres anything that could make my application stand out apart from grades yk?

I see. I’m an offer holder for chemistry at Oxford, though I do have a cousin currently at Oxford who is studying law.

He stood out by joining a debating society and I think that really helped him to build on a lot of the skills expected of successful applicants. https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/undergraduate-selection-criteria
Reply 6
Original post by TypicalNerd
I see. I’m an offer holder for chemistry at Oxford, though I do have a cousin currently at Oxford who is studying law.

He stood out by joining a debating society and I think that really helped him to build on a lot of the skills expected of successful applicants. https://www.law.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/undergraduate-selection-criteria


thats great to hear , congrats on your offer ! do you remember what grades your cousin scored ? :smile:)))))
Original post by spam44
thats great to hear , congrats on your offer ! do you remember what grades your cousin scored ? :smile:)))))

Thanks.

I’m pretty sure he got A* A* A* A in maths, politics, history and RS (I can’t remember which subject he got the A in).

That said, you don’t need 4 A levels. Stick to 3 and get the highest possible set of grades you can get.
Original post by spam44
ive ordered "letter to a law student" which was recommended by a lot of people. in my PS I can show passion and involvement in the subject through my supercurriculars , ive competed on national level in debates, (I was told this could be relevant ) ive given a ted talk which was posted on the official ted x channel wiht 38 millions subscriber (also told it could prove my public speaking ability) im helping a legal team to finalise the paperwork for the construction of an orphanage in Cameroon and im taking a MOOC law Course by Harvard.

im not too sure these are relevant since some tell me that its pointless while others tell me that I shoudl mention them


Definitely try and read some other (ideally academic) material on law as well. What it is specifically doesn't matter so much as showing you have engaged with it critically and reflected on it. So whatever is of interest really.

Letters to a Law Student (also The Rule of Law) seems to be read by just about every law applicant so while probably of interest and relevance personally, the benefit will mainly be dependent on your personal reflections on that. Just listing it in your PS is not going to do anything for your application. However you shouldn't be just listing things in your PS at all - the point is to show not tell how you have prepared for studying that subject and what your interests in it are.

There isn't any "silver bullet" that will instantly make your application much more likely to succeed than others, as if there was it would almost immediately become known more widely and then everyone will do that. You can't just try and tick some imagined box on the admissions tutor's sheet that says "has read X definitely give an offer!" - because it doesn't exist.

The way to improve your chances of getting into Oxford in general is to read around your subject and to think about what you are reading. Not just doing the reading for the sake of it.
Reply 9
Original post by spam44
ive ordered "letter to a law student" which was recommended by a lot of people. in my PS I can show passion and involvement in the subject through my supercurriculars , ive competed on national level in debates, (I was told this could be relevant ) ive given a ted talk which was posted on the official ted x channel wiht 38 millions subscriber (also told it could prove my public speaking ability) im helping a legal team to finalise the paperwork for the construction of an orphanage in Cameroon and im taking a MOOC law Course by Harvard.

im not too sure these are relevant since some tell me that its pointless while others tell me that I shoudl mention them

So you need to do more than list these - how does debating prepare you for a law degree. I'd find something a bit more unusual to read and reflect on what you read ..
Original post by spam44
ive ordered "letter to a law student" which was recommended by a lot of people. in my PS I can show passion and involvement in the subject through my supercurriculars , ive competed on national level in debates, (I was told this could be relevant ) ive given a ted talk which was posted on the official ted x channel wiht 38 millions subscriber (also told it could prove my public speaking ability) im helping a legal team to finalise the paperwork for the construction of an orphanage in Cameroon and im taking a MOOC law Course by Harvard.

im not too sure these are relevant since some tell me that its pointless while others tell me that I shoudl mention them


What ted talk was it? If you think an admissions tutor is going to be impressed by you listing a channel with millions of subscribers, think again. Or if you think the tutor is going to actually watch the ted talk then you're also wrong. As others have said, your PS isn't just a listing exercise, it's far more impressive to go into detail about your motivations for giving a talk, how you prepared and delivered it, what you learned, how it's relevant and useful to law and so on. Just simply saying ''I gave a ted talk on a channel with millions of subscribers'' is pointless...an admissions tutor won't give a rat's arse about that.
(edited 10 months ago)
Reply 11
Original post by Sorcerer of Old
What ted talk was it? If you think an admissions tutor is going to be impressed by you listing a channel with millions of subscribers, think again. Or if you think the tutor is going to actually watch the ted talk then you're also wrong. As others have said, your PS isn't just a listing exercise, it's far more impressive to go into detail about your motivations for giving a talk, how you prepared and delivered it, what you learned, how it's relevant and useful to law and so on. Just simply saying ''I gave a ted talk on a channel with millions of subscribers'' is pointless...an admissions tutor won't give a rat's arse about that.


lmaoooo ofc ofc I wasnt about to list my achievement by bullet points on my PS , but I mean I could easily explain the public skills and immense amount of preparation needed in order to give a speech which I could then link to important part of studying law it was just to give a rough idea of what I could potential add into my personal statement.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending