The Student Room Group

The value of holding a Foundation Degree under a BSc in the same field.

I am currently loaded on and studying a formal Foundation Degree course in Aviation Engineering - a field I have worked in for the last 18 years - which is going well.

However, I have recently had a full 240 credits of Recognised Prior Learning approved by a university based on my career experience, and can begin a BSc (Hons) Top-Up course with them almost straight away.

I'm struggling to decide whether to stick with the FD to completion, and then do the BSc, or take the opportunity to skip the Foundation. The advantage of having the BSc completed over a year earlier is very tempting right now.

Is there merit to having both a FD and BSc certificate listed on a CV versus just a BSc on it's own? Do employers take much notice of the FD if you have the higher level qualification on top of it?

Thanks.
(edited 8 months ago)
Reply 1
Foundation degrees are only ever really meant to be "introductory" courses to the main BSc or BA, intended for people who have underperformed in their A-Levels, or haven't done the right subjects, or who have perhaps been out of the academic system too long (which I'm guessing is why you're enrolled on one). They're designed to get students up to speed with the relevant material and current academic practices so that they can then undertake the main degree.

It isn't really something that adds anything to your CV, since the content will be built on and eclipsed by the full BSc. I think if there was an industry expectation that ideal candidates would have both an FD and a BSc, then universities wouldn't offer stand-alone BScs without the foundation year.
Original post by fedora34
Foundation degrees are only ever really meant to be "introductory" courses to the main BSc or BA, intended for people who have underperformed in their A-Levels, or haven't done the right subjects, or who have perhaps been out of the academic system too long (which I'm guessing is why you're enrolled on one). They're designed to get students up to speed with the relevant material and current academic practices so that they can then undertake the main degree.

It isn't really something that adds anything to your CV, since the content will be built on and eclipsed by the full BSc. I think if there was an industry expectation that ideal candidates would have both an FD and a BSc, then universities wouldn't offer stand-alone BScs without the foundation year.


Aren't foundation YEARS and foundation DEGREES different things?
Original post by fedora34
Foundation degrees are only ever really meant to be "introductory" courses to the main BSc or BA, intended for people who have underperformed in their A-Levels, or haven't done the right subjects, or who have perhaps been out of the academic system too long (which I'm guessing is why you're enrolled on one). They're designed to get students up to speed with the relevant material and current academic practices so that they can then undertake the main degree.

It isn't really something that adds anything to your CV, since the content will be built on and eclipsed by the full BSc. I think if there was an industry expectation that ideal candidates would have both an FD and a BSc, then universities wouldn't offer stand-alone BScs without the foundation year.

OP isn't talking about a foundation year
Original post by Jordan7426
I am currently loaded on and studying a formal Foundation Degree course in Aviation Engineering - a field I have worked in for the last 18 years - which is going well.

However, I have recently had a full 240 credits of Recognised Prior Learning approved by a university based on my career experience, and can begin a BSc (Hons) Top-Up course with them almost straight away.

I'm struggling to decide whether to stick with the FD to completion, and then do the BSc, or take the opportunity to skip the Foundation. The advantage of having the BSc completed over a year earlier is very tempting right now.

Is there merit to having both a FD and BSc certificate listed on a CV versus just a BSc on it's own? Do employers take much notice of the FD if you have the higher level qualification on top of it?

Thanks.


This is going to be a very personal decision.
If I were you I'd be considering whether I think I can thrive in the 1 yr BSc study - your entire degree classification will be based on that one year (whether you take it now with industry experience or next year following completion of your FdSc). Basically how confident are you that you'll be able to do yourself justice in those final year modules now. If you think you're ready then go for it but if you're a bit concerned (and I'm guessing you are or you wouldn't have started this thread on TSR) then I would stick with your current path. 1 extra year is worth it if it's the difference between getting a 1st/2:1 or a 2:2/3rd.
Reply 5
Original post by StriderHort
Aren't foundation YEARS and foundation DEGREES different things?

(Yes I see I accidentally said "foundation year" at the end of my comment but that was just a mistake)

But no, they're functionally the same thing if you're intending to pursue the full BSc, which it sounds like OP is since they're trying to decide between skipping the FD to go onto the BSc early, or completing the FD and then going on to the BSc.

The content of an FD is eclipsed by the full BSc so if you have the opportunity to skip ahead, and you were planning to upgrade anyway, then there is no advantage to completing the FD.
Original post by fedora34
(Yes I see I accidentally said "foundation year" at the end of my comment but that was just a mistake)

But no, they're functionally the same thing if you're intending to pursue the full BSc, which it sounds like OP is since they're trying to decide between skipping the FD to go onto the BSc early, or completing the FD and then going on to the BSc.

The content of an FD is eclipsed by the full BSc so if you have the opportunity to skip ahead, and you were planning to upgrade anyway, then there is no advantage to completing the FD.


They're not at all the same thing

A FY is a 1 year course in addition to a degree at level 3 that only awards credits

A FdA/FdSc is a 2 year course that is equivalent to a DipHE/HND or the first 2 years of a BA/BSc at levels 4 and 5 that awards a recognised qualification.

Following a FY someone would need to study an additional 3 years to get a BA/BSc (4 years in total to qualify)
Following a FdA/FdSc someone would need to study an additional 1 year to get a BA/BSc (3 years in total to qualify)
(edited 8 months ago)
Reply 7
Original post by PQ
They're not at all the same thing

A FY is a 1 year course in addition to a degree at level 3 that only awards credits

A FdA/FdSc is a 2 year course that is equivalent to a DipHE/HND or the first 2 years of a BA/BSc at levels 4 and 5 that awards a recognised qualification.

Following a FY someone would need to study an additional 3 years to get a BA/BSc (4 years in total to qualify)
Following a FdA/FdSc someone would need to study an additional 1 year to get a BA/BSc (3 years in total to qualify)


No, read what I wrote again. I know they are different courses, but I said they are functionally the same thing if you are planning to pursue the full degree. No employer is going to look at someone with a BSc and say "well if they also had a foundation degree they'd be more qualified", because they know that the BSc supersedes the foundation degree, just like a BA/BSc supersedes a foundation year.

The fact that a foundation degree is a standalone qualification, unlike a foundation year, is irrelevant in this context since OP wants to do the BSc, they just don't know whether completing the foundation degree will add anything to their CV. But it won't.
(edited 8 months ago)
Reply 8
Thanks everyone for the responses.

I am pretty happy that I could complete the BSc comfortably based on my experience, without the need to go through the FD content first.

As Fedora correctly identified, my question is mainly aimed at how it would appear to anyone reviewing my academic qualifications afterwards; whether the lower FD would be considered to show progression and building learning over time, or whether it would be ignored based on having the higher qualification - much like no one really cares what your GCSE results were once you get A-levels etc....

To add a bit of meat on the bones, the FD is in Aviation Engineering, and the BSc top-up is in Engineering and Management. So part of me thinks the FD may show that my learning has more grounding in practical and technical Engineering, rather than being more Management focused. But on the other side I could easily evidence that in the work experience side of my CV.

The main crux of this is that I want to complete the BSc as soon as possible, but not at a detriment to my CV profile and employability.

Thanks again.
Original post by Jordan7426
Thanks everyone for the responses.

I am pretty happy that I could complete the BSc comfortably based on my experience, without the need to go through the FD content first.

As Fedora correctly identified, my question is mainly aimed at how it would appear to anyone reviewing my academic qualifications afterwards; whether the lower FD would be considered to show progression and building learning over time, or whether it would be ignored based on having the higher qualification - much like no one really cares what your GCSE results were once you get A-levels etc....

To add a bit of meat on the bones, the FD is in Aviation Engineering, and the BSc top-up is in Engineering and Management. So part of me thinks the FD may show that my learning has more grounding in practical and technical Engineering, rather than being more Management focused. But on the other side I could easily evidence that in the work experience side of my CV.

The main crux of this is that I want to complete the BSc as soon as possible, but not at a detriment to my CV profile and employability.

Thanks again.

Are you hoping to get CEng (or IEng or Eng Tech) status at any stage? If so it'd be sensible to look at the requirements and accreditation options for the two degrees with the RAS.
I suspect an Eng & Management BSc wouldn't offer any engineering exemptions or accreditation - it's generally only MEngs with management topics that have accreditation
(edited 8 months ago)
Reply 10
Original post by PQ
Are you hoping to get CEng (or IEng or Eng Tech) status at any stage? If so it'd be sensible to look at the requirements and accreditation options for the two degrees with the RAS.
I suspect an Eng & Management BSc wouldn't offer any engineering exemptions or accreditation - it's generally only MEngs with management topics that have accreditation


I am EngTech with ImechE currently, and will likely upgrade to IEng once I have the BSc.

It's is a reasonably well trodden path with my place of work (Military) to get the professional recognition though, so I am not too worried about that side.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending