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A-level History exam practice

Can someone give me feedback on this Russia exam answer, if possible? And what things do I need to add or improve on?

To what extent was the destruction of the Kulaks the most important outcome of Stalin's campaign of forced collectivisation? (25 marks)

Kulaks were wealthy peasants who emerged during the new economic policy in 1920 in which were considered a threat to other classes, especially peasants, and to agricultural development due to their hoarding of grain and supplies, sabotaging the successes of collectivisation. The destruction of the Kulaks was indeed a significant outcome of Stalin's campaign of forced collectivisation. However, it's important to consider other outcomes, such as its political and ideological successes.

The destruction of Kulaks played some role in the outcome of Stalin's campaign of forced collectivisation due to its association with capitalism in which Stalin wanted to eliminate in order to enforce communist ideals through collectivisation. For instance, in 1929, it was announced that the Kulak class would be liquidated and not join the collectives, which was a key part of Stalin's forced collectivisation to remove their resistance and influence within agriculture and rather allowing the Soviet government to gain control over it in order to implement collectivisation policies. This announcement led to many Kulaks being forced off their homes and sent to Gulags, ultimately resulting in all 7 Million Kulaks being eliminated in 1934. As a result, their forced removal disrupted the agricultural output of Russia whilst serving as a strategy to ensure communist beliefs are reinforced in the long term and reshape the social landscape of the country.

Moreover, another significant outcome of Stalin's campaign of compulsory collectivisation was achieving political stability- a primary objective for the government. By 1934, 70% of peasants' households were collectivised, meaning that the majority of peasant families had joined the collective farms and, thus, marked a step towards consolidating control over the peasants and the countryside. This was further proven when about 100% of peasant households were collectivised by 1941, demonstrating a rapid progress in solidifying their authority and, hence, gaining political stability was a much more crucial outcome for both the success and longevity of the regime.

Furthermore, another profound outcome of Stalin's forced collectivisation campaign was meeting the ideological values. Through the introduction of collectivisation policies, Russia has become more communist, as illustrated by the increase in grain exports by 5 Million tonnes in only three years, creating a self-sufficient country whilst simultaneously aligning its policies with the 'socialism in one country' doctrine. Therefore, achieving the ideological purpose is greater than achieving political stability as it acts as a drive in guiding the overall direction and the ultimate success of collectivisation.

Overall, the destruction of the kulaks was a partial outcome of Stalin's campaign of forced collectivisation. While it played a role in eliminating wealthier peasants, the greater outcomes of achieving political stability and meeting ideological values were more significant. Political stability ensured the consolidation of power, whereas meeting ideological values focused on fully embodying communist values to contribute to the success of the collectivisation policies.
(edited 4 months ago)
Original post by bayan2005
Can someone give me feedback on this Russia exam answer, if possible? And what things do I need to add or improve on?

To what extent was the destruction of the Kulaks the most important outcome of Stalin's campaign of forced collectivisation? (25 marks)

Kulaks were wealthy peasants who emerged during the new economic policy in 1920 in which were considered a threat to other classes, especially peasants, and to agricultural development due to their hoarding of grain and supplies, sabotaging the successes of collectivisation. The destruction of the Kulaks was indeed a significant outcome of Stalin's campaign of forced collectivisation. However, it's important to consider other outcomes, such as its political and ideological successes.

The destruction of Kulaks played some role in the outcome of Stalin's campaign of forced collectivisation due to its association with capitalism in which Stalin wanted to eliminate in order to enforce communist ideals through collectivisation. For instance, in 1929, it was announced that the Kulak class would be liquidated and not join the collectives, which was a key part of Stalin's forced collectivisation to remove their resistance and influence within agriculture and rather allowing the Soviet government to gain control over it in order to implement collectivisation policies. This announcement led to many Kulaks being forced off their homes and sent to Gulags, ultimately resulting in all 7 Million Kulaks being eliminated in 1934. As a result, their forced removal disrupted the agricultural output of Russia whilst serving as a strategy to ensure communist beliefs are reinforced in the long term and reshape the social landscape of the country.

Moreover, another significant outcome of Stalin's campaign of compulsory collectivisation was achieving political stability- a primary objective for the government. By 1934, 70% of peasants' households were collectivised, meaning that the majority of peasant families had joined the collective farms and, thus, marked a step towards consolidating control over the peasants and the countryside. This was further proven when about 100% of peasant households were collectivised by 1941, demonstrating a rapid progress in solidifying their authority and, hence, gaining political stability was a much more crucial outcome for both the success and longevity of the regime.

Furthermore, another profound outcome of Stalin's forced collectivisation campaign was meeting the ideological values. Through the introduction of collectivisation policies, Russia has become more communist, as illustrated by the increase in grain exports by 5 Million tonnes in only three years, creating a self-sufficient country whilst simultaneously aligning its policies with the 'socialism in one country' doctrine. Therefore, achieving the ideological purpose is greater than achieving political stability as it acts as a drive in guiding the overall direction and the ultimate success of collectivisation.

Overall, the destruction of the kulaks was a partial outcome of Stalin's campaign of forced collectivisation. While it played a role in eliminating wealthier peasants, the greater outcomes of achieving political stability and meeting ideological values were more significant. Political stability ensured the consolidation of power, whereas meeting ideological values focused on fully embodying communist values to contribute to the success of the collectivisation policies.

Well, overall, I think it's really good. You summarise clearly the main topics regarding the collectivisation policy in the USSR, both in terms of ideology (as a communist ideal) and agriculture (including the comments on the source) and also the economic factors.
I would just note that kulaks did exist before the NEP (they simply reemerged after the War Communism period), and when you say "Russia has become more communist" I would replace it with "communism grew rapidly in Russia". In general, it's very good.

Good luck:smile:
Reply 2
Original post by 121254Gnrdocarmo
Well, overall, I think it's really good. You summarise clearly the main topics regarding the collectivisation policy in the USSR, both in terms of ideology (as a communist ideal) and agriculture (including the comments on the source) and also the economic factors.
I would just note that kulaks did exist before the NEP (they simply reemerged after the War Communism period), and when you say "Russia has become more communist" I would replace it with "communism grew rapidly in Russia". In general, it's very good.

Good luck:smile:


Thanks alot :smile:

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