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GCSE English Literature - An inspector Calls.

How far does Priestley present Eric as a character who learns important lessons about society in An Inspector Calls?

In an Inspector Calls each character plays a part in social responsibility and social class. Priestley uses Eric who transforms from an intractable and pompous juvenile to a mature and increasingly confident socialist. Edwardian audience would feel his transformation is most relatable. Eric Birling blames everyone but himself for his mistakes, then gradually accepts responsibility.

Priestley presents Eric Birling as an obnoxious, immature boy in Act 1. "early twenties, not quite at ease, half shy, half assertive". Priestley tries to foreshadow his character arc and his journey to change. This suggests he might not have as many experiences in society or industry as he is young. We can see later in the lay, he grows independent, showing how the young generation has a malleable mindset. Priestley shows how to "whole" one must separate from unjust views. Juxtaposition shows his flawed nature. In addition, it can show his drunkness, mixing two worlds showing a lean towards capitalism. Empathy in men is valued and provides a healthier society. Edwardian audience would know Eric as a simple, self-explanatory character that is relatable. Therefore, Priestley clearly shows Eric as an obnoxious and immature character who later shows the possibility of gaining confidence and responsibility.

Eric Birling is presented as a deceitful and selfish individual "She was pretty and a good sport". Eric reveals his thoughts on Eva; relating to what he did to Eva, this is very insulting. Priestley uses Eric to show what young and older men think of women from a lower class. This is very patronizing of the lower class. He sees her as a timepass or hobby; objectifying her. The quote further connotes how love is seen as a game. Priestley shows the Edwardian audience that what Eric did was okay at that time. Priestley shows us how higher middle-class bourgeoisie, take advantage of lower-class individuals to gain them profit and joy. Therefore, Priestley effectively uses Eric to show how the lower class has no say or place in society.

In Act 3, Priestley portrays a complete change, confident and fluent as opposed to euphemistic and polite statements. "(shouting) the girls' dead and we all helped to kill her". This socialist attitude shows Eric's attitude, The stage directions, and shouting, imply Eric fighting like Priestley fought for the rights of the lower class; uses Eric as a mouthpiece. Furthermore, conveying passion and enthusiasm emulates the inspector and prompts people to change, The audience can feel his stage presence and didactic lesson of social responsibility. Priestley shows how he thinks it's a collective responsibility, a shared effort. Suggesting Eric accepts his responsibility and is guilty. Recognizes his unacceptable attitudes. Eric looks back on his actions and regrets. ironic as Eric is not sympathetic at the start, but eventually develops through the Inspector's revelations. Therefore Priestley uses Eric to show how the younger generation learns lessons in society and recognizes his guilt and responsibility for Eva's suicide.

In conclusion, Priestley effectively shows Eric as a character who learns important lessons in society. Firstly, Priestley presents him as an obnoxious and immature person who later gains confidence and responsibility. Priestley shows how the Bourgeoisie takes advantage of the lower class like Eric did for his needs. In Act 3, Preistley changes Eric into a socialist mouthpiece of the inspector and lower class. He realizes his guilt and accepts responsibility, however also shares how he thinks it's a collective responsibility, showing dichotomy between generations. Showing how he could change. Therefore, Priestley effectively shows Eric as a character who learns important lessons, in society.

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n an Inspector Calls each character plays a part in social responsibility and social class. Priestley uses Eric who transforms from an intractable and pompous juvenile to a mature and increasingly confident socialist. Edwardian audience would feel his transformation is most relatable. Eric Birling blames everyone but himself for his mistakes, then gradually accepts responsibility.Priestley presents Eric Birling as an obnoxious, immature boy in Act 1. "early twenties, not quite at ease, half shy, half assertive". Priestley tries to foreshadow his character arc and his journey to change. This suggests he might not have as many experiences in society or industry as he is young. We can see later in the lay, he grows independent, showing how the young generation has a malleable mindset. Priestley shows how to "whole" one must separate from unjust views. Juxtaposition shows his flawed nature. In addition, it can show his drunkness, mixing two worlds showing a lean towards capitalism. Empathy in men is valued and provides a healthier society. Edwardian audience would know Eric as a simple, self-explanatory character that is relatable. Therefore, Priestley clearly shows Eric as an obnoxious and immature character who later shows the possibility of gaining confidence and responsibility.Eric Birling is presented as a deceitful and selfish individual "She was pretty and a good sport". Eric reveals his thoughts on Eva; relating to what he did to Eva, this is very insulting. Priestley uses Eric to show what young and older men think of women from a lower class. This is very patronizing of the lower class. He sees her as a timepass or hobby; objectifying her. The quote further connotes how love is seen as a game. Priestley shows the Edwardian audience that what Eric did was okay at that time. Priestley shows us how higher middle-class bourgeoisie, take advantage of lower-class individuals to gain them profit and joy. Therefore, Priestley effectively uses Eric to show how the lower class has no say or place in society.In Act 3, Priestley portrays a complete change, confident and fluent as opposed to euphemistic and polite statements. "(shouting) the girls' dead and we all helped to kill her". This socialist attitude shows Eric's attitude, The stage directions, and shouting, imply Eric fighting like Priestley fought for the rights of the lower class; uses Eric as a mouthpiece. Furthermore, conveying passion and enthusiasm emulates the inspector and prompts people to change, The audience can feel his stage presence and didactic lesson of social responsibility. Priestley shows how he thinks it's a collective responsibility, a shared effort. Suggesting Eric accepts his responsibility and is guilty. Recognizes his unacceptable attitudes. Eric looks back on his actions and regrets. ironic as Eric is not sympathetic at the start, but eventually develops through the Inspector's revelations. Therefore Priestley uses Eric to show how the younger generation learns lessons in society and recognizes his guilt and responsibility for Eva's suicide.In conclusion, Priestley effectively shows Eric as a character who learns important lessons in society. Firstly, Priestley presents him as an obnoxious and immature person who later gains confidence and responsibility. Priestley shows how the Bourgeoisie takes advantage of the lower class like Eric did for his needs. In Act 3, Preistley changes Eric into a socialist mouthpiece of the inspector and lower class. He realizes his guilt and accepts responsibility, however also shares how he thinks it's a collective responsibility, showing dichotomy between generations. Showing how he could change. Therefore, Priestley effectively shows Eric as a character who learns important lessons, in society.

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