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a level economics

What are the pros and cons of A-level economics?
Reply 1
Original post by ua12345
What are the pros and cons of A-level economics?


Pros:
Really interesting
Really impressive to do well in
Has a bit of everything (multiple choice, essay writing, diagrams)

Cons:
Difficult ! ~ but you can say nearly every alevel subject is difficult.
Lots of content to cover
Need to do research and have contextual knowledge on markets and economic events
For macro everything links together

If you really put the work in and keep on top of everything i highly recommend i find it really interesting and enjoy it
Reply 2
Original post by tildaox
Pros:
Really interesting
Really impressive to do well in
Has a bit of everything (multiple choice, essay writing, diagrams)

Cons:
Difficult ! ~ but you can say nearly every alevel subject is difficult.
Lots of content to cover
Need to do research and have contextual knowledge on markets and economic events
For macro everything links together

If you really put the work in and keep on top of everything i highly recommend i find it really interesting and enjoy it
Thanks
But when you say for macro everything links together, what do you mean?
Is macroeconomics the hardest?, this is what I have heard from others.
And if it is, why?
Reply 3
Original post by ua12345
Original post by tildaox
Pros:
Really interesting
Really impressive to do well in
Has a bit of everything (multiple choice, essay writing, diagrams)

Cons:
Difficult ! ~ but you can say nearly every alevel subject is difficult.
Lots of content to cover
Need to do research and have contextual knowledge on markets and economic events
For macro everything links together

If you really put the work in and keep on top of everything i highly recommend i find it really interesting and enjoy it
Thanks
But when you say for macro everything links together, what do you mean?
Is macroeconomics the hardest?, this is what I have heard from others.
And if it is, why?


So basically micro is focussed on 1 market at a time (eg the housing market)which is a bit more straight forward. Macro is about how different markets interlink (eg how does something happening in the oil market affect the economy then affect spending then affect inflation and affect other markets) also looking at other countries economies and trading. So you learn micro first because it is a lot of foundation knowledge you need for macro. You learn different stuff for macro too but you use stuff you’ve learnt in micro and build on it which is why it can be a bit tricker to wrap your head around. I would definitely say that macro is more interesting though so I wouldn’t worry because nearly everyone finds it more difficult than micro.
Reply 4
Original post by tildaox
Original post by ua12345
Original post by tildaox
Pros:
Really interesting
Really impressive to do well in
Has a bit of everything (multiple choice, essay writing, diagrams)

Cons:
Difficult ! ~ but you can say nearly every alevel subject is difficult.
Lots of content to cover
Need to do research and have contextual knowledge on markets and economic events
For macro everything links together

If you really put the work in and keep on top of everything i highly recommend i find it really interesting and enjoy it
Thanks
But when you say for macro everything links together, what do you mean?
Is macroeconomics the hardest?, this is what I have heard from others.
And if it is, why?


So basically micro is focussed on 1 market at a time (eg the housing market)which is a bit more straight forward. Macro is about how different markets interlink (eg how does something happening in the oil market affect the economy then affect spending then affect inflation and affect other markets) also looking at other countries economies and trading. So you learn micro first because it is a lot of foundation knowledge you need for macro. You learn different stuff for macro too but you use stuff you’ve learnt in micro and build on it which is why it can be a bit tricker to wrap your head around. I would definitely say that macro is more interesting though so I wouldn’t worry because nearly everyone finds it more difficult than micro.


Ok thanks
Reply 5
Bear in mind if you want an A or an A star in the subject you will have to dedicate hours outside of lessons just for researching real life examples. For example, you may research the export sector in Brazil, or government policies in America. With these, you will need to memorise statistics. Also, you would have to know most of the main economic things happening in the UK currently (memorising statistics for inflation for example). And finally, to secure that A*, researching specific examples of specific businesses would be helpful, e.g. Tesco, Shell, Audi, Amazon.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 6
Original post by ajde_2
Bear in mind if you want an A or an A star in the subject you will have to dedicate hours outside of lessons just for researching real life examples. For example, you may research the export sector in Brazil, or government policies in America. With these, you will need to memorise statistics. Also, you would have to know most of the main economic things happening in the UK currently (memorising statistics for inflation for example). And finally, to secure that A
*, researching specific examples of specific businesses would be helpful, e.g. Tesco, Shell, Audi, Amazon.If I'm going to be honest
I want to do Law at uni and the sixth form I'm applying to makes us do 4 a-levels
So i wasn't sure between
English Literature, History, Religious Studies and Classical Civilisation
or
English Literature, History, Religious Studies and Economics
But I think based on the advice given, economics is quite a difficult a-level and since there is no compulsory subjects required for law, I will opt for Classics over Economics as Classics links well to other subjects I'm taking
Thanks for your help
Reply 7
Original post by ua12345
If I'm going to be honest
I want to do Law at uni and the sixth form I'm applying to makes us do 4 a-levels
So i wasn't sure between
English Literature, History, Religious Studies and Classical Civilisation
or
English Literature, History, Religious Studies and Economics
But I think based on the advice given, economics is quite a difficult a-level and since there is no compulsory subjects required for law, I will opt for Classics over Economics as Classics links well to other subjects I'm taking
Thanks for your help


fair enough ! hope you enjoy classics
Reply 8
Original post by ua12345
If I'm going to be honest
I want to do Law at uni and the sixth form I'm applying to makes us do 4 a-levels
So i wasn't sure between
English Literature, History, Religious Studies and Classical Civilisation
or
English Literature, History, Religious Studies and Economics
But I think based on the advice given, economics is quite a difficult a-level and since there is no compulsory subjects required for law, I will opt for Classics over Economics as Classics links well to other subjects I'm taking
Thanks for your help
Oh thats coincidental -- i take economics, english literature and history. Since you are being made to do a fourth subject, yeah classics would hopefully ease the pressure a bit since english lit and history are content heavy too. Good luck for your a levels!
Reply 9
Original post by ajde_2
Original post by ua12345
If I'm going to be honest
I want to do Law at uni and the sixth form I'm applying to makes us do 4 a-levels
So i wasn't sure between
English Literature, History, Religious Studies and Classical Civilisation
or
English Literature, History, Religious Studies and Economics
But I think based on the advice given, economics is quite a difficult a-level and since there is no compulsory subjects required for law, I will opt for Classics over Economics as Classics links well to other subjects I'm taking
Thanks for your help
Oh thats coincidental -- i take economics, english literature and history. Since you are being made to do a fourth subject, yeah classics would hopefully ease the pressure a bit since english lit and history are content heavy too. Good luck for your a levels!


Oh nice
Which exam board do you do for English lit and history ?, and what are they both like in terms of pros and cons? Which do you prefer and why ?
Thanks
Reply 10
Original post by ua12345
Oh thats coincidental -- i take economics, english literature and history. Since you are being made to do a fourth subject, yeah classics would hopefully ease the pressure a bit since english lit and history are content heavy too. Good luck for your a levels!


Oh nice
Which exam board do you do for English lit and history ?, and what are they both like in terms of pros and cons? Which do you prefer and why ?
ThanksI do AQA English Literature B, and AQA for history (i do The Making of Modern Britain and Tsarist and Communist Russia, and the French Revolution for coursework).
Of course, this is my personal opinion but yeah. Sorry for writing so much, i wasn't sure how much detail to write lol

English Lit pros:

Teaches you to use critics and reference (skills you may use in uni)

Some open-book exams (though this may be dependent on your exam board, but i do)

You learn how to think critically (these skills that are made in both english and history are more valuable to employers -- also -- with the rise of AI, if you choose a level subjects (and then a degree) that allows critical thinking, your job is more likely to be secure in the future because it's a valuable skill.

If you liked english lit for GCSE you will love it for A level

Its more in depth, rather than simple analysis like 'the noun 'boat' means...' so its challenging at first to learn, but rewarding too

This might seem more obvious but if you like reading, you have to do alot for the subject (some completely independently)

For AQA, our coursework weighs 20% of the A level, so if you just do that well it really will help your final grade


English Lit cons:

Not a wise idea to take if you hate writing long essays -- i'm pretty sure i have a 3 hour exam for one of my papers

Do not do it if you think you won't fully read the books/plays/poems they give you (people who fully read books etc. always get the higher grades)

Very content heavy because of reading, learning context, critics etc...

Most of what you learn won't come up on the exam, you have to very carefully pick relevant points


History pros

Very interesting topics. For AQA, i do one 'breadth' study (explores a wide range of historical events, themes, or periods within a specific time frame) and one 'depth' study (delves deeply into a particular historical topic, event, or period, analyzing its significance, causes, and consequences in detail), so there is great balance in the subject

Teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information

Many of the skills you use in English are similar in History. For both, you use evidence from books and make a nuanced answer in relation to the question

Studying History involves conducting research, whether it's examining primary sources or analyzing scholarly works (again, may be useful for uni)

LOTS of resources available online for revision, including free study notes, flashcards, videos etc


History cons

Have to learn a whole new different way to answering essays than in GCSEs --> but if you have a good teacher u'll be fine

For coursework, you have to do quite a lot of outside reading (writing about 1,500 words - also applies to english)

Memorization --> if you struggle with remembering hyper-specific facts, you might struggle in the subject, since it often requires specific examples to back up your arguments.

Complexity of content --> linking across themes, people and events can be challenging for some. Your knowledge of the subject must be solid to do this.

Reply 11
Original post by ajde_2
Oh nice
Which exam board do you do for English lit and history ?, and what are they both like in terms of pros and cons? Which do you prefer and why ?
Thanks
I do AQA English Literature B, and AQA for history (i do The Making of Modern Britain and Tsarist and Communist Russia, and the French Revolution for coursework).
Of course, this is my personal opinion but yeah. Sorry for writing so much, i wasn't sure how much detail to write lol

English Lit pros:

Teaches you to use critics and reference (skills you may use in uni)

Some open-book exams (though this may be dependent on your exam board, but i do)

You learn how to think critically (these skills that are made in both english and history are more valuable to employers -- also -- with the rise of AI, if you choose a level subjects (and then a degree) that allows critical thinking, your job is more likely to be secure in the future because it's a valuable skill.

If you liked english lit for GCSE you will love it for A level

Its more in depth, rather than simple analysis like 'the noun 'boat' means...' so its challenging at first to learn, but rewarding too

This might seem more obvious but if you like reading, you have to do alot for the subject (some completely independently)

For AQA, our coursework weighs 20% of the A level, so if you just do that well it really will help your final grade


English Lit cons:

Not a wise idea to take if you hate writing long essays -- i'm pretty sure i have a 3 hour exam for one of my papers

Do not do it if you think you won't fully read the books/plays/poems they give you (people who fully read books etc. always get the higher grades)

Very content heavy because of reading, learning context, critics etc...

Most of what you learn won't come up on the exam, you have to very carefully pick relevant points


History pros

Very interesting topics. For AQA, i do one 'breadth' study (explores a wide range of historical events, themes, or periods within a specific time frame) and one 'depth' study (delves deeply into a particular historical topic, event, or period, analyzing its significance, causes, and consequences in detail), so there is great balance in the subject

Teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information

Many of the skills you use in English are similar in History. For both, you use evidence from books and make a nuanced answer in relation to the question

Studying History involves conducting research, whether it's examining primary sources or analyzing scholarly works (again, may be useful for uni)

LOTS of resources available online for revision, including free study notes, flashcards, videos etc


History cons

Have to learn a whole new different way to answering essays than in GCSEs --> but if you have a good teacher u'll be fine

For coursework, you have to do quite a lot of outside reading (writing about 1,500 words - also applies to english)

Memorization --> if you struggle with remembering hyper-specific facts, you might struggle in the subject, since it often requires specific examples to back up your arguments.

Complexity of content --> linking across themes, people and events can be challenging for some. Your knowledge of the subject must be solid to do this.

Thanks so much for this information
For history, the sixth form that I'm applying to do does the exact same course as you. The tsarist and communist russia side, to me, doesn't seem as interesting as the making of modern britain but nonetheless it sounds like a good subject and for law at uni it's probably a good idea.
For english lit, the sixth form i'm applying to does OCR but the information you've given about the subject is still very useful.

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