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    (Original post by Kartace)
    So the GDC is the general dental council and they are basically there to regulate dentists and protect patients. You can view their website here:
    http://www.gdc-uk.org/Aboutus/Pages/default.aspx

    As a dental professional you have to be registered each year with the GDC in order to legally practice within the UK. The registrant members of the GDC are:
    • dentists
    • clinical dental technicians,
    • dental hygienists,
    • dental nurses,
    • dental technicians,
    • dental therapists, and orthodontic therapists.



    The GDC also (very importantly) Sets the standards for dental education and caries out audits, visits and inspections of dental schools.

    They also set the standards for good dental care, there are 9 main ones that we are supposed to abide by as professional dentists:
    1. Put patients’ interests first
    2. Communicate effectively with patients
    3. Obtain valid consent
    4. Maintain and protect patients’ information
    5. Have a clear and effective complaints procedure
    6. Work with colleagues in a way that is in patients’ best interests
    7. Maintain, develop and work within your professional knowledge and skills
    8. Raise concerns if patients are at risk
    9. Make sure your personal behavior maintains patients’ confidence in you and the dental profession


    They also deal with, arbitrate, mediate and preside upon fitness to practice and negligence claims. This is really important as it means that we as dentists need to take meticulous, clear and comprehensive notes. This is because, in the event of a dentist being sued, the notes are considered a medicolegal document and if they're incomplete or inadequate then you're looking down the barrel of a big fine and possible suspension or removal from the register!

    An interesting side note...there has been a recent stir of activity surrounding the GDC as they published an advert in the telegraph asking any patient who wasn't "completely happy" with their care to come forward and make a complaint. This is of course massive overkill and has wound a lot of dentists up and has even lead to a petition to abolish/boycott the GDC, lead even more interestingly by the BDA (british dental association)



    This advert is especially poignant in the wake of recent 60% rises in registration fees too. The GDC isn't popular among dental professionals at the moment. Most of us feel that it would be much much more professional for the GDC to advise patients to attempt to sort things out with their dentist in-practice first, before taking the high-handed route and going straight to the GDC...the only way a dentist hears about ia complaint through this method is when they're just about to be sued...most dentists would prefer the chance to sort things out with the patient one on one.

    Anyway, whatever you make of this situation, whether you agree or disagree woith the GDC is up to you...it's something to talk about in relation to dentistry in the news and it shows that you have an awareness of how important this is and how important the GDC and the standards of care are to dental professionals.

    You can read more about this story here:
    http://www.smile-onnews.com/news/vie...legraph-advert

    http://www.privatedentistry.co.uk/ge...dvert-outrage/

    http://www.dentistry.co.uk/news/bda-...l-raise-arf-64

    Hope that's helped a bit!

    Ryan.
    This is extremely useful thank you very much! Are there any books which you found to be particularly useful when applying to dental school?

    So far I have this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Getting-into...rds=adam+cross
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    (Original post by slg60)
    This is extremely useful thank you very much! Are there any books which you found to be particularly useful when applying to dental school?

    So far I have this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Getting-into...rds=adam+cross
    I'll be honest...I didn't use any books when i applied for dental school. I just researched and talked to dentists. However, if you feel that books will help you, get all the ones you can!
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    (Original post by ando181)
    Are all dental schools equally difficult in terms of the course and are the degrees seen as exactly the same or do some hold more value?
    Hey there, an interesting question. One which is not easily answered by a student. The reason being, i only know how hard my course is...because i've only ever studied at barts!

    The obvious answer is that all dental schools are the same. This is because the GDC sets the standards for dental education and dictates that all student dentists should cover a certain level of material and understanding in any given year. However, how that material is covered and assessed is, of course, up to the individual institution.

    I know for example that in barts, most of the marks for our final grade at the end of the year come from exams (this changes from year to year, third year is 40% based upon case studies) But there are also a good chunk of marks to be gained from coursework and in course assessments. But the 5 main exams are sat at the end of the year in may/june time. Whereas my friends in sheffield sit half of their end of years in January and the the other half in may/june.

    Whether you consider either to be more difficult is a matter of opinion. It comes down to how you think you would best cope with assessments. It also comes down to which teaching style you like the sound of. PBL or traditional lectures. I personally despise PBL and prefer lectures. But if you were a student who particularly liked PBL...you might find the course at barts to be very difficult, or vice versa!

    The truth is though, that it doesn't really matter. Once you get into a dental school you adapt and grow accustomed to the ways and customs of that school and the way that all other dental schools do it seems weird and alien. I don't think there is any real difference between any of the course...the way assessments are carried out might favour particular students in particular institutions...but you will never be able to predict that accurately enough for it to influence your decision either way.

    Perhaps the only exception to this rule is Leeds...who, as i'm sure you all know. Now run an MDS course. I'm not going to pretend to be an expert on this course but i believe it's to do with the fact that they gain slightly more credits through doing slightly more exams than usual? Since the number of credits a standard BDS course contains is already so high though...i don't know if these exams actually make that much of a difference. The gap is pretty negligible (some leeds students may well disagree with me on this however) Other unis may compensate for the time leeds spend doing these exams by offering more clinical work. I know in barts we have an exceptionally large amount of clinic time compared to other school. In fact i believe ours is the highest at the moment.

    As for jobs afterwards....who knows if the MDS will give people an advantage over other students with a BDS...my gut feeling is no to be honest. It's much more about how you communicate and come across as a dentist in interview and how you deal with the scenarios posed to you in you VT interviews rather than the number of exams you've sat. But i don't have a crystal ball and i couldn't say for certain either way to be honest. Perhaps years from now we'll all be wishing we had an MDS too? But i suspect not.

    So in summary, all dental school courses are different and test different aspects of your knowledge and skills in many wide and varying ways. Which one is hardest? Who knows? I doubt it's even as simple as that. My advise...go for the one you like the sound of the most and that you have the most chance of getting in to....if you can afford to worry about things like how hard the course is, rather than worrying about getting in at all...then you're either foolish or a very very confident applicant!

    Hope that's helped!
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    (Original post by Kartace)
    Hey there, an interesting question. One which is not easily answered by a student. The reason being, i only know how hard my course is...because i've only ever studied at barts!

    The obvious answer is that all dental schools are the same. This is because the GDC sets the standards for dental education and dictates that all student dentists should cover a certain level of material and understanding in any given year. However, how that material is covered and assessed is, of course, up to the individual institution.

    I know for example that in barts, most of the marks for our final grade at the end of the year come from exams (this changes from year to year, third year is 40% based upon case studies) But there are also a good chunk of marks to be gained from coursework and in course assessments. But the 5 main exams are sat at the end of the year in may/june time. Whereas my friends in sheffield sit half of their end of years in January and the the other half in may/june.

    Whether you consider either to be more difficult is a matter of opinion. It comes down to how you think you would best cope with assessments. It also comes down to which teaching style you like the sound of. PBL or traditional lectures. I personally despise PBL and prefer lectures. But if you were a student who particularly liked PBL...you might find the course at barts to be very difficult, or vice versa!

    The truth is though, that it doesn't really matter. Once you get into a dental school you adapt and grow accustomed to the ways and customs of that school and the way that all other dental schools do it seems weird and alien. I don't think there is any real difference between any of the course...the way assessments are carried out might favour particular students in particular institutions...but you will never be able to predict that accurately enough for it to influence your decision either way.

    Perhaps the only exception to this rule is Leeds...who, as i'm sure you all know. Now run an MDS course. I'm not going to pretend to be an expert on this course but i believe it's to do with the fact that they gain slightly more credits through doing slightly more exams than usual? Since the number of credits a standard BDS course contains is already so high though...i don't know if these exams actually make that much of a difference. The gap is pretty negligible (some leeds students may well disagree with me on this however) Other unis may compensate for the time leeds spend doing these exams by offering more clinical work. I know in barts we have an exceptionally large amount of clinic time compared to other school. In fact i believe ours is the highest at the moment.

    As for jobs afterwards....who knows if the MDS will give people an advantage over other students with a BDS...my gut feeling is no to be honest. It's much more about how you communicate and come across as a dentist in interview and how you deal with the scenarios posed to you in you VT interviews rather than the number of exams you've sat. But i don't have a crystal ball and i couldn't say for certain either way to be honest. Perhaps years from now we'll all be wishing we had an MDS too? But i suspect not.

    So in summary, all dental school courses are different and test different aspects of your knowledge and skills in many wide and varying ways. Which one is hardest? Who knows? I doubt it's even as simple as that. My advise...go for the one you like the sound of the most and that you have the most chance of getting in to....if you can afford to worry about things like how hard the course is, rather than worrying about getting in at all...then you're either foolish or a very very confident applicant!

    Hope that's helped!
    Why are you less keen on PBL?

    Does Barts allow you to intercalulate? If yes:
    Are you intercalculating?

    What can you intercalculate in?

    What are you intercalculating in? Do most people intercalculate?

    Do you Know of any other universities that let you intercalculate?

    How important do you think intercalculting is in becoming a consultant
    and/or specialist?

    Do you have any ideal if you are planning on specialising if so what in?
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    (Original post by slg60)
    Why are you less keen on PBL?

    Does Barts allow you to intercalulate? If yes:
    Are you intercalculating?

    What can you intercalculate in?

    What are you intercalculating in? Do most people intercalculate?

    Do you Know of any other universities that let you intercalculate?

    How important do you think intercalculting is in becoming a consultant
    and/or specialist?

    Do you have any ideal if you are planning on specialising if so what in?
    I'm less keen on PBL in the first two years in particular because i don't think that it suits the type of information that you're being taught. The basic clinical sciences don't particularly lend themselves to being learned via pbl. That's what i feel anyway. I think that the sheer amount of content you have to cover and understand (which is ****ing huge) is much better delivered in a lecture based environment, more similar to school We DO have PBLs but they're somewhat different to the way that universities like manchester/liverpool might do them.

    Barts does offer intercalation

    I'm not currently intercalating

    You can intercalate in oral biology and this is by far the most sensible and common choice, but there are a wide range of other things such as pharmacology, neuroscience etc.

    Intercalation is pretty rare in dentistry but very common in medicine. (i don't know any dentists who have intercalated, most of the medics i know want to though)

    I don't know of any other universities that offer intercalation with the exception of kings college london.

    Intercalation is pretty irrelevant to General practice. However, if you want to become an academic or go into research and become a lecturer or a professor etc. Then it suddenly starts to become much much more desirable. For specialisation, intercalation isn't really necessary as such, but it can't hurt.

    My opinion is, if it's something you really want to do...or you really want to go into research. Then intercalate to your hearts content! It will probably also give you a bit of an edge in any interview or job application you go for...but not by a huge amount in my opinion.

    The intercalation offered at barts right now have all been changed to one years MSc's rather than one year BSc's too...so i guess that's an added bonus?

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    (Original post by Kartace)
    Hey there, an interesting question. One which is not easily answered by a student. The reason being, i only know how hard my course is...because i've only ever studied at barts!

    The obvious answer is that all dental schools are the same. This is because the GDC sets the standards for dental education and dictates that all student dentists should cover a certain level of material and understanding in any given year. However, how that material is covered and assessed is, of course, up to the individual institution.

    I know for example that in barts, most of the marks for our final grade at the end of the year come from exams (this changes from year to year, third year is 40% based upon case studies) But there are also a good chunk of marks to be gained from coursework and in course assessments. But the 5 main exams are sat at the end of the year in may/june time. Whereas my friends in sheffield sit half of their end of years in January and the the other half in may/june.

    Whether you consider either to be more difficult is a matter of opinion. It comes down to how you think you would best cope with assessments. It also comes down to which teaching style you like the sound of. PBL or traditional lectures. I personally despise PBL and prefer lectures. But if you were a student who particularly liked PBL...you might find the course at barts to be very difficult, or vice versa!

    The truth is though, that it doesn't really matter. Once you get into a dental school you adapt and grow accustomed to the ways and customs of that school and the way that all other dental schools do it seems weird and alien. I don't think there is any real difference between any of the course...the way assessments are carried out might favour particular students in particular institutions...but you will never be able to predict that accurately enough for it to influence your decision either way.

    Perhaps the only exception to this rule is Leeds...who, as i'm sure you all know. Now run an MDS course. I'm not going to pretend to be an expert on this course but i believe it's to do with the fact that they gain slightly more credits through doing slightly more exams than usual? Since the number of credits a standard BDS course contains is already so high though...i don't know if these exams actually make that much of a difference. The gap is pretty negligible (some leeds students may well disagree with me on this however) Other unis may compensate for the time leeds spend doing these exams by offering more clinical work. I know in barts we have an exceptionally large amount of clinic time compared to other school. In fact i believe ours is the highest at the moment.

    As for jobs afterwards....who knows if the MDS will give people an advantage over other students with a BDS...my gut feeling is no to be honest. It's much more about how you communicate and come across as a dentist in interview and how you deal with the scenarios posed to you in you VT interviews rather than the number of exams you've sat. But i don't have a crystal ball and i couldn't say for certain either way to be honest. Perhaps years from now we'll all be wishing we had an MDS too? But i suspect not.

    So in summary, all dental school courses are different and test different aspects of your knowledge and skills in many wide and varying ways. Which one is hardest? Who knows? I doubt it's even as simple as that. My advise...go for the one you like the sound of the most and that you have the most chance of getting in to....if you can afford to worry about things like how hard the course is, rather than worrying about getting in at all...then you're either foolish or a very very confident applicant!

    Hope that's helped!
    I know its very difficult to get in but i'd like to know if job opportunities would be relevant depending on the uni you went to or would it be irrelevant?
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    (Original post by ando181)
    I know its very difficult to get in but i'd like to know if job opportunities would be relevant depending on the uni you went to or would it be irrelevant?
    It matters only in so much as the education, experience, opportunities and activities that you get involved in whilst you're there studying at that uni, because that is what will shape the sort of person and dentist you will become. That is for VT training at least.

    Of course, whilst theoretically when you go out and apply for your first real job the only variable should be how good you are on paper and how well you interview/ are able to do the job. The fact is that i'm sure some practice owners out their have their own views on certain dental schools and which they prefer. Perhaps a dentist who graduated from manchester would be much more likely to employ someone from manchester. Who knows? I'm sure we'd all like to think not.

    In the majority of cases, i'm sure that the percieved "prestige" of a university has nothing to do with job prospects. However, in a small minority of cases, it might do.

    Having said all that, i'm a 2nd/3rd year dentist...i've never had a real job as a dentist and i've certainly never been a practice owner...so all i can give you is my best guess. You would have to ask a selection of qualified dentists and practice owners if you want a real world answer!
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    (Original post by Kartace)
    I'm less keen on PBL in the first two years in particular because i don't think that it suits the type of information that you're being taught. The basic clinical sciences don't particularly lend themselves to being learned via pbl. That's what i feel anyway. I think that the sheer amount of content you have to cover and understand (which is ****ing huge) is much better delivered in a lecture based environment, more similar to school We DO have PBLs but they're somewhat different to the way that universities like manchester/liverpool might do them.

    Barts does offer intercalation

    I'm not currently intercalating

    You can intercalate in oral biology and this is by far the most sensible and common choice, but there are a wide range of other things such as pharmacology, neuroscience etc.

    Intercalation is pretty rare in dentistry but very common in medicine. (i don't know any dentists who have intercalated, most of the medics i know want to though)

    I don't know of any other universities that offer intercalation with the exception of kings college london.

    Intercalation is pretty irrelevant to General practice. However, if you want to become an academic or go into research and become a lecturer or a professor etc. Then it suddenly starts to become much much more desirable. For specialisation, intercalation isn't really necessary as such, but it can't hurt.

    My opinion is, if it's something you really want to do...or you really want to go into research. Then intercalate to your hearts content! It will probably also give you a bit of an edge in any interview or job application you go for...but not by a huge amount in my opinion.

    The intercalation offered at barts right now have all been changed to one years MSc's rather than one year BSc's too...so i guess that's an added bonus?

    Ah interesting thank you very much. I was curious because I know that for any chance at being high up in a specialism as a doctor you need to intercalculate (most do anatomy if they want to be a surgeon I believe), i guess that is not the case for dentists. Any idea what you want to specialise in or do you plan to go into general practice?
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    (Original post by slg60)
    Ah interesting thank you very much. I was curious because I know that for any chance at being high up in a specialism as a doctor you need to intercalculate (most do anatomy if they want to be a surgeon I believe), i guess that is not the case for dentists. Any idea what you want to specialise in or do you plan to go into general practice?
    That's true...i live with 5 medics. All of whom want to intercalate at somepoint. For them it carries a lot more points in their foundation training assessments. UCL for example make all of their students intercalate as a compulsory year!

    In dentistry....it's not really caught on yet. However, dentistry is becoming more and more competitive and perhaps in a few years it will be the same as medicine and in order to get anywhere you will have to intercalate. Who knows?

    I myself, am somewhat torn. On the one hand i really really want to be an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. It's what i've always wanted to do since i started out in dental school. However, as i've matured and gotten a bit older, wiser and uglier! I've also started to appreciate other things in life, such as family, hobbies, time to myself and a good night's sleep! These are things which are sacrificed to a greater or lesser degree in a career like maxfax. However, a career as a GDP promises 9-5 hours, no on-call and a great social life. But the question i have to ask myself is whether that is the life for me...can i turn my back on the excitement and passion that i feel when i think about maxfax?

    The simple answer is...i'll have to try it and see. Perhaps i'll know more what i want to do after another 3 years in dental school? I can do my DFY1 in general dentistry then i can do a DFY2 in maxfax as a senior house officer. This should give me some real hands-on experience and then...hopefully...i'll know for sure what i want to do with the rest of my life
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    (Original post by Kartace)
    That's true...i live with 5 medics. All of whom want to intercalate at somepoint. For them it carries a lot more points in their foundation training assessments. UCL for example make all of their students intercalate as a compulsory year!

    In dentistry....it's not really caught on yet. However, dentistry is becoming more and more competitive and perhaps in a few years it will be the same as medicine and in order to get anywhere you will have to intercalate. Who knows?

    I myself, am somewhat torn. On the one hand i really really want to be an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. It's what i've always wanted to do since i started out in dental school. However, as i've matured and gotten a bit older, wiser and uglier! I've also started to appreciate other things in life, such as family, hobbies, time to myself and a good night's sleep! These are things which are sacrificed to a greater or lesser degree in a career like maxfax. However, a career as a GDP promises 9-5 hours, no on-call and a great social life. But the question i have to ask myself is whether that is the life for me...can i turn my back on the excitement and passion that i feel when i think about maxfax?

    The simple answer is...i'll have to try it and see. Perhaps i'll know more what i want to do after another 3 years in dental school? I can do my DFY1 in general dentistry then i can do a DFY2 in maxfax as a senior house officer. This should give me some real hands-on experience and then...hopefully...i'll know for sure what i want to do with the rest of my life
    Sounds like a good plan, so if you chose to do maxfax after your DFY2 is that when you would go back to med school or do you do other training and then go to med. Also I imagine that a some of the chose overlaps can you do a sort of fast track course? Is it many more years of training to specialise as a maxillo facial surgeon than to specialise as a periodontist or orthodontist?
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    (Original post by Kartace)
    I'm bored and i fancy helping some potential applicants if i can

    So, fire away....ask whatever you want and i'll try to answer it as best i can. It can be about life at dental school...hell it can even be questions about the science of dentistry or ethics or the GDC or whatever.
    Hi, I realise this thread was started a while ago, but I have a question ! In terms of personal statements, I'm worried about how to prove manual dexterity as I am not pianist etc. I know it might sound silly but I'm worried this will hold me back 😬
    Thanks ☺️


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