Maths year 11

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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    You want to add 10% on the 5000

    10% as a decimal is 0.1

    and 100% as a decimal is 1

    If you were to add 10% of 5000 back onto the 5000, you would have 110% of the original value

    Therefore we multiply by 1.1 as 110% = 1.1

    When you want to increase by a percentage aways have the value larger than 1, as it accounts for your current value. want to increase by 58% = 1.58, increase by 240% = 2.4 etc. etc.
    I got this



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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    I got this



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    Correct! You got this.
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    Correct! You got this.
    But the answer page states this :/



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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    But the answer page states this :/



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    The book is wrong.

    Did it two different ways - either the question is wrong or the answer is.

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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    Correct! You got this.
    Yap I agree.
    As the other ones I got right



    What if I get this on a non calc paper?



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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Yap I agree.
    As the other ones I got right



    What if I get this on a non calc paper?



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    It won't be. But you can break numbers down. Gimme a sec

    Edit:
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    It won't be. But you can break numbers down. Gimme a sec

    Edit:
    Don't really understand this.
    But it's okay.

    I don't know where the 20% comes from :/ is it from the 2 years?

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Don't really understand this.
    But it's okay.

    I don't know where the 20% comes from :/ is it from the 2 years?

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    oh no, I was just using that as an example as to how you calculate compound interest without a calculator.

    But because I'm ****ing stupid (i've literally just realised) I've forgot the do the second year ;/.

    Basically you take the value from the first year then use that as your "starting" value.

    So after the first year we have 10800


    10800 = 100%

    1080 = 10%
    2160 = 20%

    10800+2160 = 12 960 - amount after 2 years with 20% compound interest (starting with 9000)
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    oh no, I was just using that as an example as to how you calculate compound interest without a calculator.

    But because I'm ****ing stupid (i've literally just realised) I've forgot the do the second year ;/.

    Basically you take the value from the first year then use that as your "starting" value.

    So after the first year we have 10800


    10800 = 100%

    1080 = 10%
    2160 = 20%

    10800+2160 = 12 960 - amount after 2 years with 20% compound interest (starting with 9000)
    Awh that's fine
    I'm going to revise this now.

    And if you can, can you explain depreciation?

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Awh that's fine
    I'm going to revise this now.

    And if you can, can you explain depreciation?

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    It's essentially the opposite of compound interest; instead of increasing in value, it decreases.


    To calculate compound interest we do, for example 1000*1.1^2 - This will give us the value after 2 years at a rate of 10% compound interest


    Now for deprecation we would do 1000*0.9^2 - This will give us the value after 2 years at a rate of deprecation at 10%. (It goes down by 10% of the current value per year)

    Just remember with deprecation the decimal must be lower than 1.
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    It's essentially the opposite of compound interest; instead of increasing in value, it decreases.


    To calculate compound interest we do, for example 1000*1.1^2 - This will give us the value after 2 years at a rate of 10% compound interest


    Now for deprecation we would do 1000*0.9^2 - This will give us the value after 2 years at a rate of deprecation at 10%. (It goes down by 10% of the current value per year)

    Just remember with deprecation the decimal must be lower than 1.
    I did this now how is it ?



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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    I did this now how is it ?



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    I was unsure what you were doing, considering you were asking about deprecation.
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    I was unsure what you were doing, considering you were asking about deprecation.
    I was increasing not deprecation this

    I'm working deprecation after a few questions x

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    I was increasing not deprecation this

    I'm working deprecation after a few questions x

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    ah okay, but do you see how your answer compared to mine (your answer was a tiny bit off mine lol)
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    ah okay, but do you see how your answer compared to mine (your answer was a tiny bit off mine lol)
    Yepp I'm making these examples up myself by following yours lol

    Here I did this

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Yepp I'm making these examples up myself by following yours lol

    Here I did this

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    Yeah, they're correct. I think you've got the hang of this now
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    Yeah, they're correct. I think you've got the hang of this now
    Thank god!
    I hated percentages. I'm actually loving them now.

    I hope I get the hang of locai, bearings and sectors now!

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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    Yeah, they're correct. I think you've got the hang of this now
    Can you do a quick example of bearings please.

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Can you do a quick example of bearings please.

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    http://www.mrbartonmaths.com/resourc...7_bearings.pdf


    gimme a min
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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Can you do a quick example of bearings please.

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    Here

 
 
 
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