Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by smd4std)
    you do realise one can apply for gem with an ibms accredited biomed degree.
    What a lot of rubbish... You can apply for GEM with ANY life science degree, even Chemistry.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    What is the difference between biomedical and clinical scientists?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CharlotteF1993)
    What is the difference between biomedical and clinical scientists?
    biomedical scientists are the main part of the analytical stage of the lab - they run the analysers and check the results, ensuring the results are valid in the confines of the specific test and the controls are within the limits. Biomedical scientists register at BSc level and start at NHS AfC band 5, progressing to band 8b for chief BMS and Operations Director. Clinical scientists register at MSc level and are responsible for the reporting of abnormal results to doctors. Eg in biochem most results come back fine and are reported by BMS but even the abnormal ones a BMS would report, referring them to a CS to look over and interpret in the light of the clinical information and past presentation. Clinical scientists start on AfC band 6 and can progress to consultant CS at band 9 provided they become Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists (FRCPath). Senior BMSs are the same band as senior CS (7) and have a similar job in terms of maintaining accuracy and standards of their section of the lab, keeping up records, ensuring service delivery and researching new methods in analysis. The main difference between BMS and CS as you progress is that BMS become managers of the lab and the running of the lab and people in it, eventually taking over a department for the TECHNICAL demands/budgets/R&D whereas CS manage the aspects to do with service delivery and take care of the clinical side, more in line with a very specific area they become expert in eg metabolic biochemistry improvements, neonatal diseases. BMS are the main lab force, even seniors have about 40-50% of their job at the bench, taking care of more specialist manual techniques whereas CS may not really spend much time in labs and take a supervisory and directional role earlier in their careers but there isn't much difference really. the lines blur as different hospitals offer more leeway in what each role can and cannot do in the lab. The prime difference is (sadly I feel) that BMS cannot give clinical advice. They can phone some results out and talk to doctors about patients and samples/results but cannot comment eg cannot suggest diseases but can potentially suggest further tests. Since CS can give clinical advice that warrants them being paid a band higher than BMS.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bagsworth)
    biomedical scientists are the main part of the analytical stage of the lab - they run the analysers and check the results, ensuring the results are valid in the confines of the specific test and the controls are within the limits. Biomedical scientists register at BSc level and start at NHS AfC band 5, progressing to band 8b for chief BMS and Operations Director. Clinical scientists register at MSc level and are responsible for the reporting of abnormal results to doctors. Eg in biochem most results come back fine and are reported by BMS but even the abnormal ones a BMS would report, referring them to a CS to look over and interpret in the light of the clinical information and past presentation. Clinical scientists start on AfC band 6 and can progress to consultant CS at band 9 provided they become Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists (FRCPath). Senior BMSs are the same band as senior CS (7) and have a similar job in terms of maintaining accuracy and standards of their section of the lab, keeping up records, ensuring service delivery and researching new methods in analysis. The main difference between BMS and CS as you progress is that BMS become managers of the lab and the running of the lab and people in it, eventually taking over a department for the TECHNICAL demands/budgets/R&D whereas CS manage the aspects to do with service delivery and take care of the clinical side, more in line with a very specific area they become expert in eg metabolic biochemistry improvements, neonatal diseases. BMS are the main lab force, even seniors have about 40-50% of their job at the bench, taking care of more specialist manual techniques whereas CS may not really spend much time in labs and take a supervisory and directional role earlier in their careers but there isn't much difference really. the lines blur as different hospitals offer more leeway in what each role can and cannot do in the lab. The prime difference is (sadly I feel) that BMS cannot give clinical advice. They can phone some results out and talk to doctors about patients and samples/results but cannot comment eg cannot suggest diseases but can potentially suggest further tests. Since CS can give clinical advice that warrants them being paid a band higher than BMS.
    Wow! I want to go into a non lab based career... If i do the biomedical science course will it lead to any non lab based career? How can you become a clinical scientist?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Whos going mmu for biomed ? Foundation year?



    Hmu


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Uz25)
    Wow! I want to go into a non lab based career... If i do the biomedical science course will it lead to any non lab based career? How can you become a clinical scientist?
    There aren't many non-lab based careers you can go into with a science degree. You can do anything that requires a degree like a graduate stream for something.
    To become a clinical scientist you need at least an upper second class degree in a relevant subject (Biomed counts toward any life science based role) but the clinical scientist is still a lab based job unless you go into medical physics or physiological sciences side of things, which you can't do with a biomedical sciences degree.

    Biomedical scientists are very much lab based in their band 5 and 6 roles but once you start to enter band 7 and above you start to have less actual time in the lab and have a more supervisory and management role. Same goes for clinical scientists.
    But the same can be said for most science jobs. Lecturers don't really spend much time in the labs anymore as they've taken on other responsibilities.
    Does that help? No one stays in the lab forever unless they want to!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bagsworth)
    There aren't many non-lab based careers you can go into with a science degree. You can do anything that requires a degree like a graduate stream for something.
    To become a clinical scientist you need at least an upper second class degree in a relevant subject (Biomed counts toward any life science based role) but the clinical scientist is still a lab based job unless you go into medical physics or physiological sciences side of things, which you can't do with a biomedical sciences degree.

    Biomedical scientists are very much lab based in their band 5 and 6 roles but once you start to enter band 7 and above you start to have less actual time in the lab and have a more supervisory and management role. Same goes for clinical scientists.
    But the same can be said for most science jobs. Lecturers don't really spend much time in the labs anymore as they've taken on other responsibilities.
    Does that help? No one stays in the lab forever unless they want to!
    How long did it take you to become a registered biomedical scientist. ?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Uz25)
    How long did it take you to become a registered biomedical scientist. ?
    It takes either a 3 year degree followed by a training period of at least a year to complete a portfolio of evidence that you can submit for a certificate of competence. Or you can do a 4 year degree that incorporates a training year so you graduate being able to register with the HCPC. The latter is the best way probably because of the lack of NHS funding and staff time to put trainees through the training year.
    But when you become a biomedical scientist, it takes a further two years to specialise in a particular area.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bagsworth)
    It takes either a 3 year degree followed by a training period of at least a year to complete a portfolio of evidence that you can submit for a certificate of competence. Or you can do a 4 year degree that incorporates a training year so you graduate being able to register with the HCPC. The latter is the best way probably because of the lack of NHS funding and staff time to put trainees through the training year.
    But when you become a biomedical scientist, it takes a further two years to specialise in a particular area.
    Oh right. If i do the Biomedical Science undergraduate degree, i'm going to do the IMBS accredited degree and do the placement year hopefully in a NHS lab. Will i then become a Biomedical Scientist?

    The thing is whilst reading this thread i've noticed so many people regret doing this degree for different reasons; mainly due to the lack of jobs. People can't find jobs as a traine biomedical scientist, how will they find a job in the future?!

    I'm not the type of person who'd be amazed to work in a lab 24/7. You stated previously that you don't have to stay in a lab if you don't want to when you reach band 6/7. Reaching that band is VERY hard especially if you can't even get a Band 5 job!

    If i'd choose this degree i'd prefer to become a physiological scientist but this degree will be classed as a life science so i dunno. Therefore, i'm about 5% apart from knocking this degree from my list of choices to do at Uni. Main reasons are: lack of jobs, hard to get a job as a triane b.s, mainly have to work in labs and hardly a lot of job opportunities.

    THIS DEGREE SEEMS VERY COMPETITIVE SO MANY PEOPLE ARE APPLYING FOR IT AND MOST GRADUATED STUDENTS EITHER REGRET CHOOSING IT OR GO INTO MEDICINE.

    I'm now considering doing Nutrition/ Dietetics, Teaching or if possible go into a different science course which will lead to specific non-lab based careers. I was considering radiography but it doesn't seem like the correct career for me!

    The things i've stated above could be exaggerated but is mainly my opinion!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi there, just noticed this friendly, useful thread!!

    I'm currently taking the top-up course at Ulster uni and will be finished in the coming Jan. I'm quite depressed as I have started looking for jobs after I reckon I'm capable to work together with my study. Got 5 interviews with band 3 MLA and band 4 AP in Histopathology but all unsuccessful. The feedback returned as higher scoring from other candidates AND NOT WORKING AS A MLA BEFORE.

    I worked as a technical officer in a research lab in Hong Kong for 2 years and recently moved to the UK. I'm confident with my techniques but I didn't have any clinical lab working experience. I read the job description everytime before I applied and attend the interview and I'm sure that I fulfil most of their requirements.

    Should I try to apply those band 2 position? Please give me some advices as I'm kind of losing direction now...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by azaliatena)
    Hi there, just noticed this friendly, useful thread!!

    I'm currently taking the top-up course at Ulster uni and will be finished in the coming Jan. I'm quite depressed as I have started looking for jobs after I reckon I'm capable to work together with my study. Got 5 interviews with band 3 MLA and band 4 AP in Histopathology but all unsuccessful. The feedback returned as higher scoring from other candidates AND NOT WORKING AS A MLA BEFORE.

    I worked as a technical officer in a research lab in Hong Kong for 2 years and recently moved to the UK. I'm confident with my techniques but I didn't have any clinical lab working experience. I read the job description everytime before I applied and attend the interview and I'm sure that I fulfil most of their requirements.

    Should I try to apply those band 2 position? Please give me some advices as I'm kind of losing direction now...
    Sorry, but you are in the same boat as thousand others. Find a different career path. Laboratory jobs are severely saturated, funding cuts, no experience. etc etc.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    There is a private company which provides biomed graduates with lab experience and even the training placement in order to complete a IBMS portfolio

    Here is the website: www.pbtsltd.co.uk

    This company is not a laboratory but it cooperates with several agencies and hospital path lab to provide training courses for fresh bioscience graduates.
    It's worth to consider it if you are unemployed for a long time.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cheukhonleo)
    There is a private company which provides biomed graduates with lab experience and even the training placement in order to complete a IBMS portfolio

    Here is the website: www.pbtsltd.co.uk

    This company is not a laboratory but it cooperates with several agencies and hospital path lab to provide training courses for fresh bioscience graduates.
    It's worth to consider it if you are unemployed for a long time.
    Many thanks for your advice!! Will definitely have a go if I haven't been shortlisted for recent applications
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I'm apply for biosciences nationally and internationally )
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, I can't pick between biological sciences and biomedical sciences what would you guys recommend picking for a degree? Which one has a better job prospectus?
    Thank you
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by atimsa)
    Hi, I can't pick between biological sciences and biomedical sciences what would you guys recommend picking for a degree? Which one has a better job prospectus?
    Thank you
    Depends on what you sort of field you are looking at entering up on graduation..

    Biology is very general, you can study any module to an extent, whereas Biomedical science is quite specific, a lot of universities have fixed modules and it's designed to prepare you for work in the NHS laboratory.

    Both would be sufficient if going into research maybe your desired career, same with if you wanted graduate entry medicine, although BMS would be preferable just because of its chemistry content.


    Hope that helps!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...3#post62184893


    Please check my post on the above link.

    Biomedical doesn't necessarily guarantee you a job. Unless if you a placement year.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    yeah i need help

    im second year and averaged a 2:2 last term

    i dont think i know qhat im doing

    someone un**** my **** up pls
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wtsgd)
    yeah i need help

    im second year and averaged a 2:2 last term

    i dont think i know qhat im doing

    someone un**** my **** up pls

    I think your best bet would be to select a project in third year in a topic that your strong at and make sure the lecturer marking it is also a good marker
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Akraj)
    I think your best bet would be to select a project in third year in a topic that your strong at and make sure the lecturer marking it is also a good marker
    what shall i do for the rest of the year?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
    Useful resources

    Quick Link:

    Unanswered Life Sciences Threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.