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    (Original post by kiwi8397)
    the thing you stay in over night if you're a badman and steal a parcelforce van full of exams
    I can't rep anymore of your posts and it's making me sad because I'm dying at them :') :sorry:
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    can someone explain everything we need to know about restriction mapping
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    (Original post by kiwi8397)
    histamine causes itching and redness also
    SO histamine and prostaglandins are just used to treat injuries and stuff? treat damaged cells?
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    (Original post by halcyon3)
    would carbon dioxide and acidity be appropriate for an ions essay? also is kidney function in the spec or is it extra?
    So long as you talk about H+ ions and HCO3- ions when carbonic acid dissociates in water. Kidney is not on AQA spec.
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    (Original post by chemistrykid123)
    i wonder what they are doing with them now
    they better be appreciating them
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    (Original post by Bustamove)
    SO histamine and prostaglandins are just used to treat injuries and stuff? treat damaged cells?
    Histamine and prostaglandins are local chemical mediators designed to cause an inflammatory response, to recruit white blood cells and in the case of prostaglandins to cause pain
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    Could you say that voltage gated channels are a positive feedback of the gated sodium ion channels opening?
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    (Original post by Bethany_)
    I can't rep anymore of your posts and it's making me sad because I'm dying at them :' :sorry:
    thank you dear I'm flattered hehe ^_^ same to you
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    (Original post by bioevangelist)
    Histamine and prostaglandins are local chemical mediators designed to cause an inflammatory response, to recruit white blood cells and in the case of prostaglandins to cause pain
    ahhhh, I seeeee.... thank you
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    (Original post by Loveart99)
    If anyone is the slightest bit confused about PCR I found this website that has a great animation explaining it...

    http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/labs/pcr/
    That is brilliant. It actually makes sense to me now.
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    (Original post by chemistrykid123)
    I wonder what they are doing with them now
    All that timing and preparation when u could have just revised
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    (Original post by Commando1)
    can someone explain everything we need to know about restriction mapping
    It is a way of positioning where in a piece of DNA a restriction enzyme cuts. By studying the fragments on a gel, you can work out how many times an enzyme cuts and what size the fragments are. By combining more than one enzyme and looking at the size of fragments you can work out where on that piece of DNA the enzymes cut.
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    Guys please I need some examples of active transport?
    My mind has gone completely blank...

    Synapses? Muscles? What else?
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    (Original post by Bustamove)
    ahhhh, I seeeee.... thank you
    hey you

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HbCASRnK7Tk
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    What temperature is it that we need to know for PCR? my book is telling me two different things! help? I saw somewhere earlier on the thread about knowing it by the nearest 0.1 degree?
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    LOL
    That was actually where I got the name for my username LOL
    oh scrubs XD
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    (Original post by bioevangelist)
    It is a way of positioning where in a piece of DNA a restriction enzyme cuts. By studying the fragments on a gel, you can work out how many times an enzyme cuts and what size the fragments are. By combining more than one enzyme and looking at the size of fragments you can work out where on that piece of DNA the enzymes cut.
    thanks for the simple explanation! restriction mapping came up 4 years ago so its probably coming up this year :/
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    (Original post by charlottei)
    Guys please I need some examples of active transport?
    My mind has gone completely blank...

    Synapses? Muscles? What else?
    Cotransport of Na+ and glucose in the intestine, Na+/K+ pump, absorption of nutrients in plant root cells
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    (Original post by Bustamove)
    What temperature is it that we need to know for PCR? my book is telling me two different things! help? I saw somewhere earlier on the thread about knowing it by the nearest 0.1 degree?
    95 to 52 to 77

    The guy was joking
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    (Original post by Bustamove)
    LOL
    That was actually where I got the name for my username LOL
    oh scrubs XD
    I love scrubs I'm gonna watch a bit now
 
 
 
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