plavix2009
Badges: 1
#1
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#1
Hello
Can someone give me an idea about the salary of a physician in CT1/ST1 and in ST4 ? and how about the night shifts, they are paid separately?
Is it enough for having an acceptable life level in the UK?

(I will obtain my medical degree in France in some months and i want to come to the UK for a residency in cardiology)

Thanks
0
reply
belis
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 10 years ago
#2
Define 'acceptable life level'. You will most deffinitely not go homeless and hungry.
0
reply
Egypt
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 10 years ago
#3
CT1/2 somewhere around £30,000 to £35,000 plus banding. No idea about ST4! Night shifts do not get paid separately unless they are not part of your contract i.e locum work.
0
reply
plavix2009
Badges: 1
#4
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#4
30000 to 35000 plus "banding": What's banding??

A good level of life for me is just being able to rent a two room apartement and buying a car like every body,............... but i have been in London and it's really expensive, i know that it's not like that every where, but?? for exemple those who work in london's university hospitals, how do they live? they live in suburbs of London??

The hospitls have enough accomodations for physicians?

The life is so expensive in other major cities in the UK?

Thanks
0
reply
brokenangel
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#5
Report 10 years ago
#5
(Original post by plavix2009)
The life is so expensive in other major cities in the UK?

Thanks
God no! I could never see me being able to afford to live in London. If you chose somewhere outside of the capital 30k would happily support a family never mind someone on their own. To put it into perspective £4200 a year would get you a 1 bedroom flat to rent in a popular area of Durham.
0
reply
Egypt
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report 10 years ago
#6
Banding is the supplement to you salary to reflect the number of antisocial hours you do ie weekends and nights and evenings. They can be 20%, 40%, 50% and very rarely 80%.

So if your basic salary was £30,000 and you were on a 1A banding you would get a 50 supplement making you year earnings £45,000. The banding is rotation specific so might change throughout the year.

You could also be unbanded which would be 9am -5pm, 8am -4pm with no weekends or nights.

If you work in London you get additional "London weighting" which is approx £2000 - £4000" extra. Dont quote me in the exact figures as I have never recieved it!

Hospitals do provide accomodation however in my experience it is not significantly cheaper than private accomodation and often not very nice.

London is the most expensive place in the UK. I live in a much cheaper but of the country however I pay ~ £3000 a year in fuel to travel to and from work. It all depends on what you want and what you are prepared to pay!
0
reply
plavix2009
Badges: 1
#7
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#7
Thanks for your answers.
Then I think going to a university hospital in London is not a good choice.
And somebody knows something about the salary after ST4 ( i mean during the "main" speciality training, as i have understood after ST4 the speciality training begins and it can last bout 4 years before obtaining a specialist degree)
0
reply
Egypt
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report 10 years ago
#8
ST4 means year 4 of Specialist Training.

ST training does not, as far as I am aware, extend to ST8.

I think you need to go and do some research into the training programes in the UK. It has changed a lot in recent years and there are many different routes in to different specialities. You have to have met particular competencies to be eligible for the next part of each training scheme. If you have done 3 years work in a hospital after medical school I do not think you will be eligible for any ST4 posts, more likely ST1/2, in which case you would probably be better starting from the beginning of a training program i.e ST1/CT1. You would only have done 1 year more of hospital medicine than any other candidate and that assumes one hasn't had a year of extra experience in between FY1 and FY2 which many are starting to do now.
0
reply
No Future
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report 10 years ago
#9
(Original post by plavix2009)
Hello
Can someone give me an idea about the salary of a physician in CT1/ST1 and in ST4 ? and how about the night shifts, they are paid separately?
Is it enough for having an acceptable life level in the UK?

(I will obtain my medical degree in France in some months and i want to come to the UK for a residency in cardiology)

Thanks
e.g. Wessex deanery/area ST1 cardiologist 37k. Comfortable, decent car, holidays, nice food, going out etc. I think this includes a bonus for doing nights, or maybe that's extra on top? I dunno, but yes nights are paid higher AFAIK.

It's definitely above average UK salary
0
reply
belis
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#10
Report 10 years ago
#10
(Original post by plavix2009)
Thanks for your answers.
Then I think going to a university hospital in London is not a good choice.
And somebody knows something about the salary after ST4 ( i mean during the "main" speciality training, as i have understood after ST4 the speciality training begins and it can last bout 4 years before obtaining a specialist degree)

You are a bit confused it seems with regards to the structure of training. Speciality training begins after complition of the core training. So at the ST3 level. If you read personal specification for ST3 in cardiology you will find that they require
At least 24 months’ experience3 in medicine at ST/SHO level (not including Foundation modules)
so minimum of 4 years training post medical school. http://www.mmc.nhs.uk/pdf/PS%202009%...cardiology.pdf
0
reply
No Future
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#11
Report 10 years ago
#11
(Original post by plavix2009)
30000 to 35000 plus "banding": What's banding??

A good level of life for me is just being able to rent a two room apartement and buying a car like every body,............... but i have been in London and it's really expensive, i know that it's not like that every where, but?? for exemple those who work in london's university hospitals, how do they live? they live in suburbs of London??

The hospitls have enough accomodations for physicians?

The life is so expensive in other major cities in the UK?

Thanks
Yes, that salary would be more than adequate for what you suggest

AFAIK most large hospitals in the UK have on site accomm for staff. Prices vary but are affordable
0
reply
plavix2009
Badges: 1
#12
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#12
Hello again
Now it's clear. I was really confused, i have undestood that first you go until ST4 and then the speciality training begins ( i thought that until ST4, it's something to prepare the students and for gaining some work experience for the real speciality training which begins later !!! What i hav found in Wikipedia also let me think like that.....)
Then it's sure i do not want to begin from ST4 !!! ( i have misundrstood a litte your answers).
Now it's more acceptable for me to begin from ST1 and if they accept me in ST2 i will be very happy.

Thanks again, you know, thoses things are clear for you because you live it but for someone from another country they are not always easy to understand.
0
reply
plavix2009
Badges: 1
#13
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#13
When you say for exemple " 2 years post medical school", i think that you want to say 2 years after the first six years of medical school.
But " 2 years post medical school" in France means two years after " the first six years of medical school and the 3-5 years of your internship", because in France you do not obtain ANY diploma at the end of the first 6 years of medical school, you have to go until the end of your internship to obtain your medical degree, and until the last day of your internship you are only a "STUDENT"!!!
0
reply
belis
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#14
Report 10 years ago
#14
(Original post by plavix2009)
When you say for exemple " 2 years post medical school", i think that you want to say 2 years after the first six years of medical school.
But " 2 years post medical school" in France means two years after " the first six years of medical school and the 3-5 years of your internship", because in France you do not obtain ANY diploma at the end of the first 6 years of medical school, you have to go until the end of your internship to obtain your medical degree, and until the last day of your internship you are only a "STUDENT"!!!
Medical school in UK only lasts 5 years (6 if you do additional intercalated degree). So when I say post medical school I mean after completion of that 5 years compulsory training. Following that you do 2 years of foundation training (which sounds similar to your intership).

I sure hope that they pay you when you guys do that intership. Otherwise it sounds like a very long degree and lots of slave work.
0
reply
digitalis
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#15
Report 10 years ago
#15
(Original post by plavix2009)
When you say for exemple " 2 years post medical school", i think that you want to say 2 years after the first six years of medical school.
But " 2 years post medical school" in France means two years after " the first six years of medical school and the 3-5 years of your internship", because in France you do not obtain ANY diploma at the end of the first 6 years of medical school, you have to go until the end of your internship to obtain your medical degree, and until the last day of your internship you are only a "STUDENT"!!!
Bloody hell! No medical degree for 9-11 years of school?! I would do myself in I reckon!

Poor old OP, I was getting so confused reading through this thread!
0
reply
plavix2009
Badges: 1
#16
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#16
Not "9-14" years but "9-11" years.
0
reply
digitalis
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#17
Report 10 years ago
#17
My bad.
0
reply
plavix2009
Badges: 1
#18
Report Thread starter 10 years ago
#18
In some countries like switzerland a resident have to do "a predefined number" of acts, for exemple a cardiology resident should do 500 echocardiographies during his residency. He should write down the name of those patients, dates....signes by his chief. For obtaining his speciality diploma he should deliver those kind of lists . Otherwise it's not only the duration of residency but also the number of acts which is important, if you can not do 500 echographies your residency lasts more...until you have done those 500..
Is it the case in the UK?
0
reply
belis
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#19
Report 10 years ago
#19
(Original post by plavix2009)
Not "9-14" years but "9-11" years.
And all this is unpaid? :eek:
0
reply
belis
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#20
Report 10 years ago
#20
(Original post by plavix2009)
In some countries like switzerland a resident have to do "a predefined number" of acts, for exemple a cardiology resident should do 500 echocardiographies during his residency. He should write down the name of those patients, dates....signes by his chief. For obtaining his speciality diploma he should deliver those kind of lists . Otherwise it's not only the duration of residency but also the number of acts which is important, if you can not do 500 echographies your residency lasts more...until you have done those 500..
Is it the case in the UK?
I don't think so. Not for cardiology. There are some specialities like anaesthetics for example that require candidates to have a log book and perform certain number of various procedures at each stage of training. I don't think this is the case for medical specialities though. You will find that echocardiography in UK is usualy performed by cardiac physiologists not the doctors themselves anyway.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What factors affect your mental health the most right now? (select all that apply)

Lack of purpose or routine (268)
15.52%
Uncertainty around my education (272)
15.75%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (174)
10.08%
Isolating with family (120)
6.95%
Lack of support system (eg. Teachers, counsellors) (78)
4.52%
Lack of exercise/ability to be outside (145)
8.4%
Loneliness (170)
9.84%
Financial worries (67)
3.88%
Concern about myself or my loved ones getting ill (156)
9.03%
Exposure to negative news/social media (124)
7.18%
Lack of real life entertainment (eg. cinema, gigs, restaurants) (153)
8.86%

Watched Threads

View All