Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    Aww thanks . As I said, we will be fine! (I'm hoping that if I say that enough I will start to believe it!)
    We will (I hope). And technically we have been revising haven't we when we think about it?

    I actually looked up modal verbs for you in my grammar book I have hehe.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Yep. Discourse analysis is all of the features related to speech like turn-taking, overlapping, idiolect, ellision, ellipsis, monitoring features, pauses, fillers, etc...

    Prosodic features is the pitch, tone and stress of a words. Examples are words written in italics or bold to emphasise them, or no unvoiced pauses in speech leading to a fast tempo, giving rise to an individuals idiolect.

    Paralinguistic features is how movement in writing or speech is protrayed, or can be stage directions in plays, etc. Examples are "...and she tilted her head away from me as i spoke"- indicating that the person being spoken to is not interested. Another example is "...she caressed his head as he lay there asleep"- this woman would obviously have deep positive feelings for the man she is stroking/caressing.

    And collocation- words which habitually go together, like "pretty woman" or "as mad as a hatter"
    Unusual collocation is when words are dont "go" together, such as "pretty man" or "as quiet as a lion" (as opposed to "as quiet as a mouse")- the effect here is maybe that of humour or irony, or in the case of "pretty man", implies that the male may be in touch with his feminine side.

    any more questions??? Im here to serve
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smiley_Me)
    We will (I hope). And technically we have been revising haven't we when we think about it?

    I actually looked up modal verbs for you in my grammar book I have hehe.
    Hey, hopefully this attachment will work. I just found something I did for the Spoken Word unit and thought it might help
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: doc Key Terms.doc (35.5 KB, 134 views)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rainjan_4now)
    Yep. Discourse analysis is all of the features related to speech like turn-taking, overlapping, idiolect, ellision, ellipsis, monitoring features, pauses, fillers, etc...

    Prosodic features is the pitch, tone and stress of a words. Examples are words written in italics or bold to emphasise them, or no unvoiced pauses in speech leading to a fast tempo, giving rise to an individuals idiolect.

    Paralinguistic features is how movement in writing or speech is protrayed, or can be stage directions in plays, etc. Examples are "...and she tilted her head away from me as i spoke"- indicating that the person being spoken to is not interested. Another example is "...she caressed his head as he lay there asleep"- this woman would obviously have deep positive feelings for the man she is stroking/caressing.

    And collocation- words which habitually go together, like "pretty woman" or "as mad as a hatter"
    Unusual collocation is when words are dont "go" together, such as "pretty man" or "as quiet as a lion" (as opposed to "as quiet as a mouse")- the effect here is maybe that of humour or irony, or in the case of "pretty man", implies that the male may be in touch with his feminine side.

    any more questions??? Im here to serve

    Hooray! I actually knew something.

    So if a word is in bold to stress it, that would be a prosodic feature as proposed to graphology? Actually I think I just answered my own question there.

    Paralinguistic features is basically what the text portrays is going on then? Can this be where I introduce attitudes and values too?

    I never knew about collocation, so thanks for that.

    Actually I do have another question. If tomorrow we got an interview, from say a TV documentary what genre would that be classed as? This is going to be my problem tomorrow, actually identifying the texts in the first place.

    Thanks. I will rep you when I can. You are on my list hehe.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    Hey, hopefully this attachment will work. I just found something I did for the Spoken Word unit and thought it might help
    That was really helpful, so thanks so much.

    Hehe I can tell by some of the examples that they are from Henry V. Thank god we aren't doing that again.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smiley_Me)
    That was really helpful, so thanks so much.

    Hehe I can tell by some of the examples that they are from Henry V. Thank god we aren't doing that again.
    Lol, Good ol' Harry . I didn't mind it that much actually! But I won't miss having to learn all those quotes!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    Lol, Good ol' Harry . I didn't mind it that much actually! But I won't miss having to learn all those quotes!
    'I will not leave the half achieved Harfleur until in her ashes she lie buried'

    Hehe.

    *Coughs* yeah Genre Studies....
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Aww thanks, i'll rep you as soon as i can also
    If a word is in bold, it indeed is prosodic, as the pitch, tone, or stress of the word would differ when read, compare to a normal word. Example...

    Strikingly................Striking

    Yes i suppose you could link a + v's with paralinguistics, although i havent tried as yet

    Look at the first page, it gives you the genre already. An interview would come under the genre "the spoken word" i assume
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smiley_Me)
    'I will not leave the half achieved Harfleur until in her ashes she lie buried'

    Hehe.

    *Coughs* yeah Genre Studies....
    Lol @ your sig . "Cry God for Harry, England and St George!"
    Ok, ok, genre studies...

    I've come up with these language terms (after looking through past work):
    form
    audience
    purpose
    graphology/typography
    tone
    register
    tense
    lexis
    syntax
    sentence structure
    imparative/declarative/interrogative
    colloquial language
    contractions
    semantically paired words
    Pre/post modifiers
    lit features - similes, metaphors, etc

    Got any more?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rainjan_4now)
    Aww thanks, i'll rep you as soon as i can also
    If a word is in bold, it indeed is prosodic, as the pitch, tone, or stress of the word would differ when read, compare to a normal word. Example...

    Strikingly................Striking

    Yes i suppose you could link a + v's with paralinguistics, although i havent tried as yet

    Look at the first page, it gives you the genre already. An interview would come under the genre "the spoken word" i assume
    Thanks.

    Why can't they make the genres simple? If an interview does come up tomorrow, all I will be able to say is, 'this is an interview'. Then maybe say it shows features of such a such a genre.

    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    Lol @ your sig . "Cry God for Harry, England and St George!"
    Ok, ok, genre studies...

    I've come up with these language terms (after looking through past work):
    form
    audience
    purpose
    graphology/typography
    tone
    register
    tense
    lexis
    syntax
    sentence structure
    imparative/declarative/interrogative
    colloquial language
    contractions
    semantically paired words
    Pre/post modifiers
    lit features - similes, metaphors, etc

    Got any more?
    Genre Studies is stressful lol.

    You have plenty there Sam. Now here is your task. Define them all...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smiley_Me)
    Thanks.

    Why can't they make the genres simple? If an interview does come up tomorrow, all I will be able to say is, 'this is an interview'. Then maybe say it shows features of such a such a genre.



    Genre Studies is stressful lol.

    You have plenty there Sam. Now here is your task. Define them all...
    Lol, that's the hard part...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    How are we meant to put historical and social context in if we don't know anything?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    How are we meant to put historical and social context in if we don't know anything?
    Er guess? No basically if you get say an article on the effects of global warming, then you can say that this was a problem at the time. Discuss the effects that it will have in the future, and how the article portrays this. I think a lot of this is common sense.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    How are we meant to put historical and social context in if we don't know anything?
    if archaic language is used, say in samuel pepys diary of the great fire of london, then the language is a feature of the time, and its used to describe whats happening (the fire). Or a novel may have been written around the time of womans lib, and biases may be apparent to support the time in the text- like a sexist remark.

    Just look for words to support what is happening around the time...i say it like its easy, when it isnt!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smiley_Me)
    Er guess? No basically if you get say an article on the effects of global warming, then you can say that this was a problem at the time. Discuss the effects that it will have in the future, and how the article portrays this. I think a lot of this is common sense.
    oh gosh, i've just learnt something new! I have to use more than words to make a valid point regarding h/s contexts! Damn!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smiley_Me)
    Er guess? No basically if you get say an article on the effects of global warming, then you can say that this was a problem at the time. Discuss the effects that it will have in the future, and how the article portrays this. I think a lot of this is common sense.
    Lol common sense may be my downfall! I know what you mean though. The good thing about English is that it doesnt come down to how many facts you learn, but how well you write. At least I think that's a good thing!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by rainjan_4now)
    oh gosh, i've just learnt something new! I have to use more than words to make a valid point regarding h/s contexts! Damn!
    Using words is good through. It depends what the topic of the writing is on tomorrow.

    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    Lol common sense may be my downfall! I know what you mean though. The good thing about English is that it doesnt come down to how many facts you learn, but how well you write. At least I think that's a good thing!
    That's very true. Just remember everything you have learned.

    Comparing and contrasting is probably what I will struggle with. I mean what on earth can you compare apart from form?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smiley_Me)
    Using words is good through. It depends what the topic of the writing is on tomorrow.



    That's very true. Just remember everything you have learned.

    Comparing and contrasting is probably what I will struggle with. I mean what on earth can you compare apart from form?
    Just shove the words "In comparison" or "in contrast to text A, Text C is fairly informal" or whatever. That way the examiner will think you're comparing!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ~Sam~)
    Just shove the words "In comparison" or "in contrast to text A, Text C is fairly informal" or whatever. That way the examiner will think you're comparing!
    Good advice.

    Oh I just remembered another language feature.

    Discourse markers! 'The writer uses the discourse marker 'however' to show that he is changing the subject. Also this breaks up the text.'

    I am going to end up blagging this exam. I can see it now.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smiley_Me)
    Good advice.

    Oh I just remembered another language feature.

    Discourse markers! 'The writer uses the discourse marker 'however' to show that he is changing the subject. Also this breaks up the text.'

    I am going to end up blagging this exam. I can see it now.
    Oh yeah, I remember them! We'll be ok
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: June 27, 2005
The home of Results and Clearing

2,844

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 22 Aug '18
  2. University of Buckingham
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Thu, 23 Aug '18
  3. University of Glasgow
    All Subjects Undergraduate
    Tue, 28 Aug '18
Poll
How are you feeling about GCSE results day?
Useful resources

Make your revision easier

OMAM

Ultimate Of Mice And Men Thread

Plot, context, character analysis and everything in between.

Notes

Revision Hub

All our revision materials in one place

Love books

Common grammar and vocabulary problems

Get your questions asked and answered

Useful literary websitesStudy help rules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.