Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Is there any you can recommend before starting a degree?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I looked at Warwick's CS reading list.
    Computer Science: An Overview was a pretty interesting read, but isn't specific enough to really help you with you studies.
    If you are looked for something to get you ahead then Modern Engineering Mathematics is informative.

    Can I ask what university you are going to? Your department might well have a recommended reading list.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fallen)
    I looked at Warwick's CS reading list.
    Computer Science: An Overview was a pretty interesting read, but isn't specific enough to really help you with you studies.
    If you are looked for something to get you ahead then Modern Engineering Mathematics is informative.

    Can I ask what university you are going to? Your department might well have a recommended reading list.
    Either Leics/Lough foundation years. Or NTU/Hertfordshire. Its just my PS is pretty bare.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You must absolutely read "Computer Systems: A programming approach"
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    These books are absolutely essential for anyone if they wish to call themselves a Computer Scientist.

    Introduction to Algorithms by Thomas Cormen.
    Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach
    The C Programming Language.
    Code Complete
    The Art of Computer Programming by Knuth
    Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (honestly, learning Scheme will help you loads with programming)
    Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science
    The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering
    Mastering Regular Expressions

    If you read through all of that, you'll probably know more than a lot of recent CS graduates. If you even skim the content of some of these books your degree will be far easier to obtain.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mikejpb)
    These books are absolutely essential for anyone if they wish to call themselves a Computer Scientist.

    Introduction to Algorithms by Thomas Cormen.
    Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach
    The C Programming Language.
    Code Complete
    The Art of Computer Programming by Knuth
    Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (honestly, learning Scheme will help you loads with programming)
    Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science
    The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering
    Mastering Regular Expressions

    If you read through all of that, you'll probably know more than a lot of recent CS graduates. If you even skim the content of some of these books your degree will be far easier to obtain.
    +1 with SICP, nice!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I just got Computer Science: An Overview for £10. Win.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    I never did really bother with books much. Here's some alternative advice based on my own experiences:

    Think of a project and work on it from start to finish. For instance, a few years ago I wanted to learn more about web dev, so I followed a tutorial and decided to create my own content management system (CMS) - it took a fair few months but I got the job done and had a fully fledged CMS made with the help of LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) along with XHTML/CSS. It wasn't perfect obviously, so I spent next couple of months 'hacking' it and patching up any security holes I found.

    During this period I learnt a whole lot about website development, planning (including disaster planning), modelling (database schema, structures, relationships etc.), database management, UNIX server administration, networking, internet security, debugging and so much more.

    This also helped me immensely in the coming years, both academic and career-wise.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I wish I had the capability to sit and read books for fun. I'm just not that motivated to do more than 200 pages per month anymore :P
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    I never did really bother with books much. Here's some alternative advice based on my own experiences:

    Think of a project and work on it from start to finish. For instance, a few years ago I wanted to learn more about web dev, so I followed a tutorial and decided to create my own content management system (CMS) - it took a fair few months but I got the job done and had a fully fledged CMS made with the help of LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) along with XHTML/CSS. It wasn't perfect obviously, so I spent next couple of months 'hacking' it and patching up any security holes I found.

    During this period I learnt a whole lot about website development, planning (including disaster planning), modelling (database schema, structures, relationships etc.), database management, UNIX server administration, networking, internet security, debugging and so much more.

    This also helped me immensely in the coming years, both academic and career-wise.
    That's great advice if you're looking to improve your development skills, but you'll struggle to fully develop your theoretical knowledge simply throughout development, otherwise CS degrees would be pointless.

    I've always fundamentally believed that people should read up and build their theoretical knowledge as much as possible during university and to develop their practical skills outside of university as well as in through summer placements, open source development and part-time work. Working outside university probably developed my knowledge far more than a full term at university did.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by mikejpb)
    That's great advice if you're looking to improve your development skills, but you'll struggle to fully develop your theoretical knowledge simply throughout development, otherwise CS degrees would be pointless.

    I've always fundamentally believed that people should read up and build their theoretical knowledge as much as possible during university and to develop their practical skills outside of university as well as in through summer placements, open source development and part-time work. Working outside university probably developed my knowledge far more than a full term at university did.
    You are right of course - and great advice. I'm also doing a CS degree.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Any more recommendations? Not too expensive?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.