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    (Original post by dnumberwang)
    there's some discussion for that exam here, http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1381002, about 30 pages in though
    Oh, thanks =)
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    (Original post by ebmaj7)
    I'm in, lads.

    GCSE: 4A*, 7A.
    AS: Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Music.
    100% in C1.

    Can I ask everyone about any books they're reading? I'm not much of a book reader (I'm sure sure whether I should express this to any universities), but I know I should include some further reading.
    Just some interesting books that aren't overly complicated, any ideas?
    The music of the primes (Marcus du Sautoy) is great.
    I'd also recommend:
    A mathematician's apology (G.H. Hardy) - not full of maths, but a wonderful book.
    From Here to Infinity (Ian Stewart)
    Alex's Adventures in Numberland (Alex Bellos)

    Here's the Oxford recommended reading list:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    B r i d g i n g Ma t e r i a l
    Allenby, Reg Numbers and Proofs (1997)
    Bostock, Chandler, Rourke, Further Pure
    Mathematics (1983)
    Liebeck, A Concise Introduction to Pure
    Mathematics (2000)
    Zawaira, Hitchcock A Primer For Mathematics
    Competitions (2009)

    P o p u l a r Ma t h e m a t i c a l T e x t s
    Acheson, David 1089 and All That (2002)
    Brown, James Philosophy of Mathematics (1999)
    Clegg, Brian A Brief History of Infinity (2003)
    Courant, Robbins and Stewart What is
    Mathematics? (1996)
    Devlin, Keith
    - Mathematics: The New Golden Age (1998)
    - The Millennium Problems (2004)
    Dudley, Underwood Is Mathematics Inevitable?
    A Miscellany (2008)
    Dunham, William Journey Through Genius
    (1990)
    Du Sautoy, Marcus
    - Finding Moonshine (2008)
    - Music Of The Primes (2003)
    Gardiner, Martin The Colossal Book of
    Mathematics (2001)
    Gowers, Tim Mathematics: A Very Short
    Introduction (2002)
    Hilton, Holton, Pedersen, Mathematical
    Reflections (1998)
    Körner, T. W. The Pleasures of Counting (1996)
    Odifreddi, Piergiorgio The Mathematical
    Century: The 30 Greatest Problems of the Last
    100 Years (2004)
    Piper, Fred & Murphy, Sean Cryptography: A
    Very Short Introduction (2002)
    Polya, George How to Solve It (1945)
    Sewell, Michael (ed.) Mathematics
    Masterclasses:: Stretching the Imagination (1997)
    Singh, Simon
    - The Code Book (2000)
    - Fermat’s Last Theorem (1998)
    Stewart, Ian
    - Does God Play Dice? The New Mathematics Of
    Chaos (1989)
    - Letters to a Young Mathematician (2006)
    - Why Beauty Is Truth: The History of Symmetry
    (2007)
    H i s t o r y a n d B i o g r a p h y
    Berlinski, David Infinite Ascent – A Short
    History of Mathematics (2005)
    Burton, David The History of Mathematics
    (2007)
    Derbyshire, John Unknown Quantity – A Real
    and Imaginary History of Algebra (2006)
    Goldstein, Rebecca Incompleteness – The Proof
    and Paradox of Kurt Gödel (2005)
    Gray, Jeremy Hilbert’s Challenge (2000)
    Hellman, Hal Great Feuds in Mathematics
    (2006)
    Hodgkin, Luke A History of Mathematics –
    From Mesopotamia to Modernity (2005)
    Hodges, Andrew Alan Turing: The Enigma
    (1992)
    Hoffman, Paul The Man Who Loved Only
    Numbers (1998)
    Kline, Morris Mathematics For The Nonmathematician
    (1967)
    Pesic, Peter Abel’s Proof (2004)
    Stillwell, John Mathematics and Its History
    (2002)


    And here's the Cambridge one.

    Hope you find something interesting!
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    (Original post by anyone_can_fly)
    The music of the primes (Marcus du Sautoy) is great.
    I'd also recommend:
    A mathematician's apology (G.H. Hardy) - not full of maths, but a wonderful book.
    From Here to Infinity (Ian Stewart)
    Alex's Adventures in Numberland (Alex Bellos)

    Here's the Oxford recommended reading list:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    B r i d g i n g Ma t e r i a l
    Allenby, Reg Numbers and Proofs (1997)
    Bostock, Chandler, Rourke, Further Pure
    Mathematics (1983)
    Liebeck, A Concise Introduction to Pure
    Mathematics (2000)
    Zawaira, Hitchcock A Primer For Mathematics
    Competitions (2009)

    P o p u l a r Ma t h e m a t i c a l T e x t s
    Acheson, David 1089 and All That (2002)
    Brown, James Philosophy of Mathematics (1999)
    Clegg, Brian A Brief History of Infinity (2003)
    Courant, Robbins and Stewart What is
    Mathematics? (1996)
    Devlin, Keith
    - Mathematics: The New Golden Age (1998)
    - The Millennium Problems (2004)
    Dudley, Underwood Is Mathematics Inevitable?
    A Miscellany (2008)
    Dunham, William Journey Through Genius
    (1990)
    Du Sautoy, Marcus
    - Finding Moonshine (2008)
    - Music Of The Primes (2003)
    Gardiner, Martin The Colossal Book of
    Mathematics (2001)
    Gowers, Tim Mathematics: A Very Short
    Introduction (2002)
    Hilton, Holton, Pedersen, Mathematical
    Reflections (1998)
    Körner, T. W. The Pleasures of Counting (1996)
    Odifreddi, Piergiorgio The Mathematical
    Century: The 30 Greatest Problems of the Last
    100 Years (2004)
    Piper, Fred & Murphy, Sean Cryptography: A
    Very Short Introduction (2002)
    Polya, George How to Solve It (1945)
    Sewell, Michael (ed.) Mathematics
    Masterclasses:: Stretching the Imagination (1997)
    Singh, Simon
    - The Code Book (2000)
    - Fermat’s Last Theorem (1998)
    Stewart, Ian
    - Does God Play Dice? The New Mathematics Of
    Chaos (1989)
    - Letters to a Young Mathematician (2006)
    - Why Beauty Is Truth: The History of Symmetry
    (2007)
    H i s t o r y a n d B i o g r a p h y
    Berlinski, David Infinite Ascent – A Short
    History of Mathematics (2005)
    Burton, David The History of Mathematics
    (2007)
    Derbyshire, John Unknown Quantity – A Real
    and Imaginary History of Algebra (2006)
    Goldstein, Rebecca Incompleteness – The Proof
    and Paradox of Kurt Gödel (2005)
    Gray, Jeremy Hilbert’s Challenge (2000)
    Hellman, Hal Great Feuds in Mathematics
    (2006)
    Hodgkin, Luke A History of Mathematics –
    From Mesopotamia to Modernity (2005)
    Hodges, Andrew Alan Turing: The Enigma
    (1992)
    Hoffman, Paul The Man Who Loved Only
    Numbers (1998)
    Kline, Morris Mathematics For The Nonmathematician
    (1967)
    Pesic, Peter Abel’s Proof (2004)
    Stillwell, John Mathematics and Its History
    (2002)


    And here's the Cambridge one.

    Hope you find something interesting!
    I'm currently trying to read a Mathematician's Apology. I think I've forgotten how to read though. I just can't read any book without completely losing concentration :lol:, although I'm not very far into it and I've never read a book about maths before
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    (Original post by anyone_can_fly)
    The music of the primes (Marcus du Sautoy) is great.
    I'd also recommend:
    A mathematician's apology (G.H. Hardy) - not full of maths, but a wonderful book.
    From Here to Infinity (Ian Stewart)
    Alex's Adventures in Numberland (Alex Bellos)

    Here's the Oxford recommended reading list:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    B r i d g i n g Ma t e r i a l
    Allenby, Reg Numbers and Proofs (1997)
    Bostock, Chandler, Rourke, Further Pure
    Mathematics (1983)
    Liebeck, A Concise Introduction to Pure
    Mathematics (2000)
    Zawaira, Hitchcock A Primer For Mathematics
    Competitions (2009)

    P o p u l a r Ma t h e m a t i c a l T e x t s
    Acheson, David 1089 and All That (2002)
    Brown, James Philosophy of Mathematics (1999)
    Clegg, Brian A Brief History of Infinity (2003)
    Courant, Robbins and Stewart What is
    Mathematics? (1996)
    Devlin, Keith
    - Mathematics: The New Golden Age (1998)
    - The Millennium Problems (2004)
    Dudley, Underwood Is Mathematics Inevitable?
    A Miscellany (2008)
    Dunham, William Journey Through Genius
    (1990)
    Du Sautoy, Marcus
    - Finding Moonshine (2008)
    - Music Of The Primes (2003)
    Gardiner, Martin The Colossal Book of
    Mathematics (2001)
    Gowers, Tim Mathematics: A Very Short
    Introduction (2002)
    Hilton, Holton, Pedersen, Mathematical
    Reflections (1998)
    Körner, T. W. The Pleasures of Counting (1996)
    Odifreddi, Piergiorgio The Mathematical
    Century: The 30 Greatest Problems of the Last
    100 Years (2004)
    Piper, Fred & Murphy, Sean Cryptography: A
    Very Short Introduction (2002)
    Polya, George How to Solve It (1945)
    Sewell, Michael (ed.) Mathematics
    Masterclasses:: Stretching the Imagination (1997)
    Singh, Simon
    - The Code Book (2000)
    - Fermat’s Last Theorem (1998)
    Stewart, Ian
    - Does God Play Dice? The New Mathematics Of
    Chaos (1989)
    - Letters to a Young Mathematician (2006)
    - Why Beauty Is Truth: The History of Symmetry
    (2007)
    H i s t o r y a n d B i o g r a p h y
    Berlinski, David Infinite Ascent – A Short
    History of Mathematics (2005)
    Burton, David The History of Mathematics
    (2007)
    Derbyshire, John Unknown Quantity – A Real
    and Imaginary History of Algebra (2006)
    Goldstein, Rebecca Incompleteness – The Proof
    and Paradox of Kurt Gödel (2005)
    Gray, Jeremy Hilbert’s Challenge (2000)
    Hellman, Hal Great Feuds in Mathematics
    (2006)
    Hodgkin, Luke A History of Mathematics –
    From Mesopotamia to Modernity (2005)
    Hodges, Andrew Alan Turing: The Enigma
    (1992)
    Hoffman, Paul The Man Who Loved Only
    Numbers (1998)
    Kline, Morris Mathematics For The Nonmathematician
    (1967)
    Pesic, Peter Abel’s Proof (2004)
    Stillwell, John Mathematics and Its History
    (2002)


    And here's the Cambridge one.

    Hope you find something interesting!
    That list looks good.

    I am currently reading Mathematics: A very short introduction. It's small and not overly complicated. I thought it would be a good place to start. A concise Introduction to pure mathematics looks good. I've also read half (need to finish it) of The Divine Proportion: A study in Mathematical Beauty. It was really interesting but quite heavy going.
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    (Original post by dnumberwang)
    I'm currently trying to read a Mathematician's Apology. I think I've forgotten how to read though. I just can't read any book without completely losing concentration :lol:, although I'm not very far into it and I've never read a book about maths before
    Forgotten how to read? That's a terrible state of affairs! One of the things I like about the book is the way that he's so incredibly sad underneath it all. Have you picked up on that yet? All those references to how mathematics is for young men, for example.

    (Original post by laughylolly)
    That list looks good.

    I am currently reading Mathematics: A very short introduction. It's small and not overly complicated. I thought it would be a good place to start. A concise Introduction to pure mathematics looks good. I've also read half (need to finish it) of The Divine Proportion: A study in Mathematical Beauty. It was really interesting but quite heavy going.
    I read the concise introduction at one point (I think it came free with the newspaper a few years ago) but I've forgotten it completely. Perhaps I'm due a reread! Yeah, I'm also halfway (well, about p60) into An Imaginary Tale: The Story of ?-1. I've been halfway through for about three months now. It's really interesting, but takes so much effort to read!
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    (Original post by CharleyChester)
    You shouldn't think like that! I've applied for Maths this year on the back of 7A and 4B at GCSE and a 'you'll be lucky to get one offer' from my head of year. However, 2 months down the line from applying and i was sitting on 5 offers and am now (fingers crossed) off to Nottingham this September Obviously you have ages to think it over, but if you want any advice feel free to pm me
    Thanks very much, this was really good to hear as It's been worrying me over the last couple of weeks. Well done on all those offers though, I saw on your profile where you applied to and I'm also planning on looking at Birmingham and Nottingham. I won't give up on maths quite yet, ill see how my AS's go and then I'll make up my mind. Do you mind me asking what subjects you took and what your AS grades were?
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    (Original post by IcedTea&PotNoodle)
    Thanks very much, this was really good to hear as It's been worrying me over the last couple of weeks. Well done on all those offers though, I saw on your profile where you applied to and I'm also planning on looking at Birmingham and Nottingham. I won't give up on maths quite yet, ill see how my AS's go and then I'll make up my mind. Do you mind me asking what subjects you took and what your AS grades were?
    Maths, Further Maths, Physics, German : BCBB (i think? i don't even remember xD), but keep in mind i had my appendix out in the middle of my June exams so i know i could've done a lot better :P Good luck with your exams If you want any advice i'm pretty much always about on here, so drop us a message and i'll get back to you
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    GCSE: 5A*,3A and a B
    AS Levels: Maths, Further Maths, Economics and Biology.
    Got 97, 96, 100 in C1, C2 and S1 respectively.
    Considering to apply to read G100 at Imperial, KCL, UCL, Manchester, Birmingham.
    What books are everyone reading?
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    (Original post by laughylolly)
    I'm doing finance related work experience... closest related to Maths that I could find. And yay another girl! How come you are not thinking of applying to oxbridge, your GCSE's look pretty damn good.
    How did you find the work experience? everywhere i ask says they don't do it. :confused:
    Thanks I was thinking of applying to Cambridge but my UMS scores for my biology and chemistry exams weren't so good so i don't think i will get in and i don't want to waste a uni option applying there
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    (Original post by jerome1994)
    GCSE: 5A*,3A and a B
    AS Levels: Maths, Further Maths, Economics and Biology.
    Got 97, 96, 100 in C1, C2 and S1 respectively.
    Considering to apply to read G100 at Imperial, KCL, UCL, Manchester, Birmingham.
    What books are everyone reading?
    Welcome
    I'm currently reading Mathematics: A very short introduction just to get started (it's a pretty easy going, light book) and The Divine Proportion: A study in Mathematical Beauty (it's really interesting but quite heavy going).

    (Original post by like_a_star)
    How did you find the work experience? everywhere i ask says they don't do it. :confused:
    Thanks I was thinking of applying to Cambridge but my UMS scores for my biology and chemistry exams weren't so good so i don't think i will get in and i don't want to waste a uni option applying there
    Haven't done that work experience yet. I have it in June. I did however do a week at the British Trade Office/British Consulate in Saudi. Not really Mathematically related but I was very limited to what I could do there (since women don't really work there at all). It was really good. I learnt a lot about passports, visas, foreign policy kinda stuff but I also did quite a bit on the business side too and helped organize this event for BMI. I learnt a lot of general work skills, learnt how to use a fax machine! Talking to clients on the phone, organization etc. I would love to go back there.

    It took me a while to get work experience here. A lot of places said that they had already got people coming that week for work experience or that their firm was too small to offer it. You just gotta keep looking and asking.

    I'm kinda glad I do Highers and not A levels with the whole UMS scores and stuff. We just have end of year exams and that's it. I kinda doubt I'll be able to get into Oxford, hopefully to at least interview stage, but if I never try I'll never know so...
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    (Original post by like_a_star)
    Hi!
    GCSE's: 6A* and 5A's
    Alevels: maths, further maths, chemistry and biology (planning to drop it at the end of this year tho)
    Preperation: i work at kumon tuition and help kids with maths work, reading maths related books, going to do an open university course over summer and help out in lower school maths lessons
    possible unis to apply to: warwick, imperial, bath, bristol and nottingham
    What actually is that and how do you get a job there? Oh and which open university course are you doing? I was thinking of doing one but I couldn't find a good maths one :/

    (Original post by anyone_can_fly)
    Forgotten how to read? That's a terrible state of affairs! One of the things I like about the book is the way that he's so incredibly sad underneath it all. Have you picked up on that yet? All those references to how mathematics is for young men, for example.



    I read the concise introduction at one point (I think it came free with the newspaper a few years ago) but I've forgotten it completely. Perhaps I'm due a reread! Yeah, I'm also halfway (well, about p60) into An Imaginary Tale: The Story of ?-1. I've been halfway through for about three months now. It's really interesting, but takes so much effort to read!
    It's better now, I've gotten to the mathsy bit
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    Reading books are great, although if you're doing it to boost an Oxbridge application, it isn't going to help. I found, while at interviews, everyone who mentioned books on their PS seemed to have read them quite a while ago. At Oxford, at least, there were pre-determined interviews and wasn't really asked anything other than maths questions. Maths is probably one of the few subjects where they're very narrow minded about what they're interested in, unsurprisingly it's your mathematical abilities.
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    (Original post by Noble.)
    Reading books are great, although if you're doing it to boost an Oxbridge application, it isn't going to help. I found, while at interviews, everyone who mentioned books on their PS seemed to have read them quite a while ago. At Oxford, at least, there were pre-determined interviews and wasn't really asked anything other than maths questions. Maths is probably one of the few subjects where they're very narrow minded about what they're interested in, unsurprisingly it's your mathematical abilities.
    I would agree but I did hear some people did get asked very specific things about their application - could have been a book they read (in my case it was my interest in mathematical demography which obviously sticked out like a sore thumb because not that may people care about it ).
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    (Original post by anshul95)
    I would agree but I did hear some people did get asked very specific things about their application - could have been a book they read (in my case it was my interest in mathematical demography which obviously sticked out like a sore thumb because not that may people care about it ).
    mathematical demography?
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    (Original post by dnumberwang)
    What actually is that and how do you get a job there? Oh and which open university course are you doing? I was thinking of doing one but I couldn't find a good maths one :/
    kumon is a world wide and has tuition centres all over the world. I just have to mark childrens work (you have answer books), record their results in a record book and help them when they get stuck on work. The kids are supposed to teach themselves so you don't actually have to teach the kids unless they really need help. I was lucky getting a job there...i was going there for maths tuition and they just offered me the job because I was one of the higher students. You can apply online i think, just google kumon.
    I'm thinking of doing the story of maths course. My teacher is only letting us do the 10 credit ones and that was the only maths one.
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    (Original post by ilovedubstep)
    mathematical demography?
    you have just proved my point lol. Mathematical demography models things like how human populations change and birth rates etc change over time.
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    What work experience does everyone have lined up?
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    (Original post by anshul95)
    you have just proved my point lol. Mathematical demography models things like how human populations change and birth rates etc change over time.
    Sounds interesting. I read a bit about it in this book I'm reading. It was discussing how models are used to predict population growth. Then it went on to discuss modeling the behavior of gases... then brains and computers...

    (Original post by jerome1994)
    What work experience does everyone have lined up?
    I wrote a post about mine above ^ ^
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    (Original post by jerome1994)
    What work experience does everyone have lined up?
    nothing :ashamed2:
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    (Original post by anshul95)
    I would agree but I did hear some people did get asked very specific things about their application - could have been a book they read (in my case it was my interest in mathematical demography which obviously sticked out like a sore thumb because not that may people care about it ).
    Yeah that's what I have been considering... I know that people got asked specific questions regarding what they've put on their personal statement (a close friend of mine who got an offer from Cambridge told me that he got questioned about his reading choices). Teachers have said it also that if you put book(s) on your PS then you have to be familiar with them by the interview.

    Therefore, here's a question to EVERYONE:

    How many books would you list on your Personal Statement considering the fact that there is a large chance that you will be questioned about their content?

    For example, putting four day may result in a question that stumps you because you forgot to go over that certain area since re-reading four books would be demanding then the interviewer may assume that you lied then you're screwed. On the other hand, one book would quite obviously not go done well...

    So I would imagine for myself a compromise of either mentioning two or three books. What about you guys?
 
 
 
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