Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi I was wondering if anyone could help, I really want to be an obstetrician because the whole delivering babies is extremely interesting to me, i know you could just see then be a midwife, but its not well paid at all, unsocial hours and most of it is relieving pain, while an obstetrician is used more for serious cases, only really there for the birth and is paid decently. I could have the grades for medicine, but medicine in general really doesn't interest me, and i would really not like F1 and F2 years (unless they were with an obstetrician), any ideas on what to do? thanks
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LauraMxx)
    Hi I was wondering if anyone could help, I really want to be an obstetrician because the whole delivering babies is extremely interesting to me, i know you could just see then be a midwife, but its not well paid at all, unsocial hours and most of it is relieving pain, while an obstetrician is used more for serious cases, only really there for the birth and is paid decently. I could have the grades for medicine, but medicine in general really doesn't interest me, and i would really not like F1 and F2 years (unless they were with an obstetrician), any ideas on what to do? thanks
    Right so medicine doesn't interest you at all and you're not willing to train to become a doctor? More to the point how do you know you want to be an OB-GYN? (note you have to also work in Gynecology) The majority of med students who go in with ideal specialisation change their minds.

    Maybe go back to the drawing board?

    Ps. I'm sure most OB-GYN medics would say their job is also underpaid and with unsociable hours.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    If you genuinely have no interest in medicine as a whole, you are going to have 8 years of misery\boredom before getting to be even a baby obstetrician (assuming you get a training post). And you'll still be bored by the gynae side. Obstetrics is particularly bad in terms of antisocial hours compared with other medical\surgical specialties and I don't think you'd be much worse off as a midwife in this respect. Midwives' pay is lower but not bad and you'll be several years ahead and paying off a smaller debt. There is a career pathway for "consultant midwives" who earn quite a bit more, or management roles - as with nursing the top money is away from the bedside.

    I think the anaesthetists would take issue with the notion that midwives are for pain relief!

    This probably should be in its own thread TBH.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Huw Davies)
    I think the anaesthetists would take issue with the notion that midwives are for pain relief!
    Either Renal is busy, or he's just building up a head of steam
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    If you don't want to be a midwife and don't want to train as a doctor, then there isn't really another way of being put in charge of women's pregnancies and their babies! Plus OBGYN is not just about delivering babies, you have to be medically qualified so you can deal with things that can go wrong during a pregnancy or whilst giving birth. a midwife would handle an average pregnancy just fine but if there is a medical complication, he/she would have to call in a doctor to deal with it. You can't have your cake and eat it too. At the end of the day, you are going to be dealing with human life, two at a time for that matter so you can't just waltz in and run the show.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    How about a nurse? Senior nurses (or physician's assistants) single-handedly run the neonatal intensive care units...it is a lot quicker than medicine in terms of the time it takes to begin working in your speciality, although the pay difference is quite substantial!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LauraMxx)
    Hi I was wondering if anyone could help, I really want to be an obstetrician because the whole delivering babies is extremely interesting to me, i know you could just see then be a midwife, but its not well paid at all, unsocial hours and most of it is relieving pain, while an obstetrician is used more for serious cases, only really there for the birth and is paid decently. I could have the grades for medicine, but medicine in general really doesn't interest me, and i would really not like F1 and F2 years (unless they were with an obstetrician), any ideas on what to do? thanks
    Go be a madwive. Honestly. You will spend years of misery learning about inflammatory bowel disease and myopathies, followed by jobs that don't interest you in the slightest before you can become a gynae SHO dealing with all the sick post op patients on the ward, a million miles away from the labour ward.

    "Only there for the birth"? What? You will be doing heaps of office based antenatal clinics, antenatal screenings, MDT meetings, referrals for high risk obstetric cases, seeing emergency stuff in A&E...I think the older you get, the less the desire to spend a night on the labour ward!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm in my 3rd year of medschool and have yet to see any obstetrics. I think we spend 8 weeks doing it in the whole 5 years. So if you're not interested in any other aspect of medicine you're going to be pretty miserable!
    And obstetricians also deal with gynacological problems, so if you're not interested in that aspect then it's probably not the job for you. They also have some of the worse oncall hours, and, as saidd above, have to do clinics, screenings, etc so aren't 'only there for the birth'. Maybe just go for the midwife option.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Become a midwife.

    Medicine is still unsociable hours and you'll only get a bit of exposure to obs-gyn in f2 mayb f1. If obs is what you're interested in be a midwife. They have a VERY important role and you'll find in some cases can overshadow the doctors.
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by LauraMxx)
    Hi I was wondering if anyone could help, I really want to be an obstetrician because the whole delivering babies is extremely interesting to me, i know you could just see then be a midwife, but its not well paid at all, unsocial hours and most of it is relieving pain, while an obstetrician is used more for serious cases, only really there for the birth and is paid decently. I could have the grades for medicine, but medicine in general really doesn't interest me, and i would really not like F1 and F2 years (unless they were with an obstetrician), any ideas on what to do? thanks
    midwife for you am afraid.
    obstetricians spend relatively little of their time delivering babies.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    yes we are also talking about dealing with complicated pregnancies. How can you handle delivery of a bay from a woman with HIKV if you know nothing about medicine etc/ Obstetricians are also surgeons, so you know to know a bit more than just hold you hands out to receive the package.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LauraMxx)
    Hi I was wondering if anyone could help, I really want to be an obstetrician because the whole delivering babies is extremely interesting to me, i know you could just see then be a midwife, but its not well paid at all, unsocial hours and most of it is relieving pain, while an obstetrician is used more for serious cases, only really there for the birth and is paid decently. I could have the grades for medicine, but medicine in general really doesn't interest me, and i would really not like F1 and F2 years (unless they were with an obstetrician), any ideas on what to do? thanks
    Good question, without trying to sound like an arse medicine is the last thing you want.

    Obstetricians only handle complicated births. So instrumental deliveries, vaginal tears, post-partum haemorrhages, c-sections etc. If you want to see babies being born, don't be an obstetrician - because you'll actually spend most of your time on the obstetric ward with the women who are only ~20-35 weeks pregnant and are having problems like PV bleeding, vomitting etc.

    The midwives do the normal births and although you are right that they can prescribe some painkillers (even some suprinsngly potent ones like pethidine) actually most of them tend to be quite anti-excessive pain relief. The midwives big thing is 'normalising birth', so they tend to try and focus on it as a natural process and de-medicalise it as much as possible. Even in an obstetrician birth (like a forceps delivery) the midwife will still be there.

    You may also be suprised to know that FY1 pay is about £24K per year and I *think* midwife starting pay is about £20K so really there isn't that much difference to start with. If anything midwife pay is offset by the fact the cost of the course is covered with NHS bursaries whereas in medicine you will accumulate a rediculous amount of debt. It's only when you start looking at pay 15 years into the jobs that you see a big difference. The pay increases reasonably equally (ish), except midwives hit a pay ceiling at about £35-40K whereas the doctor pay keeps on going right up to at least £75K at consultancy (although remember that is very far into the job) and can go higher.

    If seeing babies being born is what you want to do be a midwife. Your pay will be okay and not that different. If you do medicine you'll spend 5 years of your life going through what can at times be hell at medical school, to find yourself stuck on a ward with 95 year olds who have had strokes and are basically dead which is so far away from what you want to do it will be incredibly depressing. Most hospitals don't have obstetric FY1's so it won't be until at least FY2 that you can even get close to pregnant women, and as an FY2 you'll be mostly ward based anyway rather than on the delivery suite. Equally, some medical schools only touch on obstetrics very briefly so you might find in your 5 years of medical school the sum of your obstetric experience is as little as 4-6 weeks. You could theoretically graduate from medical school without ever actually seeing someone give birth.

    I hope this helps. If your mind is not made up, I would seriously get some work experience of midwifery. You'll see the relationship between the midwives/obstetricians and I think you'll see yourself come down more on the midwife side of things.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I would say midwifery sounds perfect for you.....

    give it a quick look and see if you like it
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by airtones)
    The midwives do the normal births and although you are right that they can prescribe some painkillers (even some suprinsngly potent ones like pethidine) actually most of them tend to be quite anti-excessive pain relief. The midwives big thing is 'normalising birth', so they tend to try and focus on it as a natural process and de-medicalise it as much as possible.
    You can spot when it all goes wrong; 'my client' becomes 'your patient'.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Renal)
    You can spot when it all goes wrong; 'my client' becomes 'your patient'.
    "My client" conjures up images of Belle de Jour discussing her latest antics
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by digitalis)
    "My client" conjures up images of Belle de Jour discussing her latest antics
    Or "punter"
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Renal)
    You can spot when it all goes wrong; 'my client' becomes 'your patient'.
    Client lying on bed screaming in a pool of blood. Doctor informed.

    This is only partly made up. :eek:
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Midwife consultants can get paid anything up to just under £70,000. Admittedly, it's a promotion you'd get after years and years of on-the-job experience, and there's no guarantee that you'd ever reach that position, but it's not necessarily true that midwives get awful pay.

    Also laughing my arse off at the idea that obs & gynae consultants don't have to work unsociable hours; my mother-in-law is one, and believe me, it's not exactly a 9-5 job.

    Seriously, don't waste seven years of your life learning stuff that doesn't interest you. Just apply to be a midwife.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    WTF is this about obstetricians not working antisocial hours? So midwifes do but doctors get to leave at 5pm? Please tell me where you live I wanna work there....
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Unless babies have started sending emails 24 hours before they intend to make their way out, then both OBs and midwives HAVE to work unsociable hours. If anything, it's almost like babies go out of their way to come out in the middle of the night lol
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.