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Shops asking you to donate money to charity at the till Watch

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    Sainsbury's, Ryman etc....does anyone else find it rather cheeky the way they try to coerce/intimidate you into donating money for red nose day etc, along with the loads of other charity 'days' that seem to be increasing year on year.

    It's not the giving to charity part that bothers me, it's the way they do it. I just think it's very cheeky that they already charge you (at already over-inflated prices) for buying their items, then ask you to donate to charity at the till when you're paying. Why don't they give to charity, rather than asking us? Or just do what most other shops usually do when they need to raise a bit of extra cash, and bump up the prices by a couple of pence or so.

    They have more money than us, much more money. They're a business after all. Which makes me question why they're getting so involved in all these charity events. Just walk into any branch of Sainsbury's at the moment and you'll see what I mean.

    They start collecting money more than a month or so before the actual red nose day, so it's not like they're just asking you for one day and that's it. As I student, I find myself going into these shops on a regular basis, and I'm getting tired into being made to feel guilty just because I can't (afford to) give 'any loose change' each time I visit these stores.

    Enough is enough!
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    I completely agree this. At work we're supposed to charge people for carrier bags (the money goes to charity) and I hate it.
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    (Original post by amyyx)
    I completely agree this. At work we're supposed to charge people for carrier bags (the money goes to charity) and I hate it.
    At least that's better than directly asking people to give their money to charity.
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    (Original post by a443s)
    At least that's better than directly asking people to give their money to charity.
    Over my dead body it is. Bags should be a free addition to carry what we just bought from the store. Charging for carrier bags is disgusting. I've just taken them off the counter before and left with my belongings. The idea they do that is a joke.

    But I do agree with you. Not that it bothers me. I just generally say no. I don't value the judgements of other shoppers or the person behind the counter when it comes to these things.
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    Yeah I'm sick of the Chugging craze (Charity Mugging). It's bad enough to have people on the street trying to coerce me for money, now everyone in the shops is reminding me that me being a good person is directly proportionate to how much money I donate towards some charity related employees bonus.
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    I read this article from Chalie Brooker years ago and it makes sense.

    "On it goes, with one Bonoriffic chum after another: noted philanthropist Condoleezza Rice picks her top 10 tunes (including one by U2); Stella McCartney interviews Giorgio Armani, who has designed a pair of sunglasses for the RED charity range. These cost around £72 and will make you look like Bono: buy a 10 quid pair from Boots, bung the remaining £62 to an Aids charity and not only will you enjoy a warm philanthropic glow, no one's going to shout "w*****!" at you when you walk down the high street."

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisf...charliebrooker
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    (Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)
    Yeah I'm sick of the Chugging craze (Charity Mugging). It's bad enough to have people on the street trying to coerce me for money, now everyone in the shops is reminding me that me being a good person is directly proportionate to how much money I donate towards some charity related employees bonus.
    Exactly, I always find myself asking where the money goes.
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    (Original post by Guru Jason)
    I read this article from Chalie Brooker years ago and it makes sense.

    "On it goes, with one Bonoriffic chum after another: noted philanthropist Condoleezza Rice picks her top 10 tunes (including one by U2); Stella McCartney interviews Giorgio Armani, who has designed a pair of sunglasses for the RED charity range. These cost around £72 and will make you look like Bono: buy a 10 quid pair from Boots, bung the remaining £62 to an Aids charity and not only will you enjoy a warm philanthropic glow, no one's going to shout "w*****!" at you when you walk down the high street."

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisf...charliebrooker
    Its the celebrity endorsement that probably annoys me more than the chugging itself. It's so patronising the way people (and corporations) much richer than us are telling US to give money to charity. If such moral blackmail was at least done by 'normal' everyday people, I'd be more inclined to donate.
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    Waitrose does it best. They give you a little green token at the till after you've paid, you take it to a row of three perspex boxes that have displays above them explaining what each charity does - you pop your green token into the one you prefer. Waitrose count them and each month give a pro-rata amount to each charity according to the distribution of tokens. It's both democratic and painless.
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    (Original post by a443s)
    Its the celebrity endorsement that probably annoys me more than the chugging itself. It's so patronising the way people (and corporations) much richer than us are telling US to give money to charity. If such moral blackmail was at least done by 'normal' everyday people, I'd be more inclined to donate.
    In the wise words of Brooker, "You agree with what they're saying. You just wish they weren't the ones saying it. It's hard to donate money when your fists clenched in rage."
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    I can choose to ignore a coin pot at the till, so that's not a problem for me so much. What annoys me is that companies like these big supermarkets will then include these donations to charity as their own in press reports and annual disclosures etcetera as 'money raised'. They expect good will from our donations!
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    (Original post by Guru Jason)
    In the wise words of Brooker, "You agree with what they're saying. You just wish they weren't the ones saying it. It's hard to donate money when your fists clenched in rage."
    Even worse is how the majority of the public fall for it. How anyone can fail to see the likes of red nose day etc are just PR machines for 'celebrities' is beyond me.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Waitrose does it best. They give you a little green token at the till after you've paid, you take it to a row of three perspex boxes that have displays above them explaining what each charity does - you pop your green token into the one you prefer. Waitrose count them and each month give a pro-rata amount to each charity according to the distribution of tokens. It's both democratic and painless.
    Asda does something similar I believe
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Waitrose does it best. They give you a little green token at the till after you've paid, you take it to a row of three perspex boxes that have displays above them explaining what each charity does - you pop your green token into the one you prefer. Waitrose count them and each month give a pro-rata amount to each charity according to the distribution of tokens. It's both democratic and painless.
    What if the cost of installing and operating the perspex boxes is greater than the sum to charity?
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    (Original post by nixonsjellybeans)
    Asda does something similar I believe
    Gosh, do they, didn't know that! Do you get a token no matter what you buy?
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    (Original post by Fusion)
    What if the cost of installing and operating the perspex boxes is greater than the sum to charity?
    I'm sure they've factored that in. They run these things all year round, so the cost gets distributed across a few years, unless someone goes mad and attacks the charity boxes with a hammer or something.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Gosh, do they, didn't know that! Do you get a token no matter what you buy?
    I'm not sure how it works but I think its if you spend over so much they give you a token.
 
 
 
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