ChocInABox
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why did you choose this option?

as opposed to applying for an undergraduate course allied to medicine then going for postgraduate entry medicine?

is it because you could (i.e. you had the finances)

or because there wasn't any undergrad course you were excited/ passionate about

or because this would allow you to do what you wanted without having to spend an extra 3 years studying something you weren't so passionate about

or because you wanted to travel

or because there is no guarantee that you will get into to postgrad degree medicine so it would be silly to do another degree with the sole aim of getting into postgrad as it may not happen

or because postgraduate entry is even harder to get into than undergraduate entry..or possibly something else

Really interested and curious to hear your responses
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solarplexus
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most ppl go because they have crappy grades - A-levels mainly - why would you want to spend 5 or 6 years almost completely away from home in a new culture? if you just wanted to travel you could do so by going on holidays. Also there isn't UK student finance to help you.

US/Canada/Australia is good however but really competitive. We're talking about these bulgarian/polish and other european universities...

if u had the finances you would most likely pay to study medicine at uclan or bucks (which is private and costs 35k a year sterling).....
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Ronove
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(Original post by ChocInABox)
why did you choose this option?

as opposed to applying for an undergraduate course allied to medicine then going for postgraduate entry medicine?

is it because you could (i.e. you had the finances)

or because there wasn't any undergrad course you were excited/ passionate about

or because this would allow you to do what you wanted without having to spend an extra 3 years studying something you weren't so passionate about

or because you wanted to travel

or because there is no guarantee that you will get into to postgrad degree medicine so it would be silly to do another degree with the sole aim of getting into postgrad as it may not happen

or because postgraduate entry is even harder to get into than undergraduate entry..or possibly something else

Really interested and curious to hear your responses
Taking a place on a health professional course with the sole purpose of using it to apply to GEM is a scummy thing to do, in my opinion. Unless you'd genuinely like to work in that profession for the rest of your life if you don't get in, of course (and even then it's still a bit scummy).

I applied abroad because I live abroad.
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ChocInABox
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(Original post by solarplexus)
most ppl go because they have crappy grades - A-levels mainly - why would you want to spend 5 or 6 years almost completely away from home in a new culture? if you just wanted to travel you could do so by going on holidays. Also there isn't UK student finance to help you.

US/Canada/Australia is good however but really competitive. We're talking about these bulgarian/polish and other european universities...

if u had the finances you would most likely pay to study medicine at uclan or bucks (which is private and costs 35k a year sterling).....
interesting points
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ChocInABox
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(Original post by Ronove)
Taking a place on a health professional course with the sole purpose of using it to apply to GEM is a scummy thing to do, in my opinion. Unless you'd genuinely like to work in that profession for the rest of your life if you don't get in, of course (and even then it's still a bit scummy).

I applied abroad because I live abroad.
Would you say its a scummy thing to do because there is no guarantee of GEM and the person is unlikely to be happy if they are just applying for it as a route into medicine?
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ChocInABox
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bump.
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username1472093
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(Original post by ChocInABox)
why did you choose this option?

as opposed to applying for an undergraduate course allied to medicine then going for postgraduate entry medicine?

is it because you could (i.e. you had the finances)

or because there wasn't any undergrad course you were excited/ passionate about

or because this would allow you to do what you wanted without having to spend an extra 3 years studying something you weren't so passionate about

or because you wanted to travel

or because there is no guarantee that you will get into to postgrad degree medicine so it would be silly to do another degree with the sole aim of getting into postgrad as it may not happen

or because postgraduate entry is even harder to get into than undergraduate entry..or possibly something else

Really interested and curious to hear your responses
People who don't get AAA for medicine and dentistry often go for pharmacy, optometry, biomed etc.
Some of them have the money to study at bulgaria, romania etc etc.

Although, the majority will say 'I wanted to go abroad' etc etc, if you ask them what their a level grades are - you'll be shocked.

1)medicine/dentistry
2)pharmacy,optom,biomed - abroad medicine/dentistry

This is the case for 90% of the students.


Sorry, just telling it like it is
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Amphiprion
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(Original post by Ronove)
Taking a place on a health professional course with the sole purpose of using it to apply to GEM is a scummy thing to do, in my opinion. Unless you'd genuinely like to work in that profession for the rest of your life if you don't get in, of course (and even then it's still a bit scummy).

I applied abroad because I live abroad.
If you can deal with the debt of two degrees why is it scummy? In the US you have to have done a primary degree before you can begin medicine. I did a Marine Biology BSc first, not actually with the intention of going into medicine specifically but with a view to using it as a springboard into a different science related degree. I wanted to do medicine but had a lot of problems in year 12 and 13 which trashed by A2s.
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username1472093
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(Original post by Amphiprion)
If you can deal with the debt of two degrees why is it scummy? In the US you have to have done a primary degree before you can begin medicine. I did a Marine Biology BSc first, not actually with the intention of going into medicine specifically but with a view to using it as a springboard into a different science related degree. I wanted to do medicine but had a lot of problems in year 12 and 13 which trashed by A2s.
He said health professional course....
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ChocInABox
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(Original post by alevelzzz)
People who don't get AAA for medicine and dentistry often go for pharmacy, optometry, biomed etc.
Some of them have the money to study at bulgaria, romania etc etc.

Although, the majority will say 'I wanted to go abroad' etc etc, if you ask them what their a level grades are - you'll be shocked.

1)medicine/dentistry
2)pharmacy,optom,biomed - abroad medicine/dentistry

This is the case for 90% of the students.


Sorry, just telling it like it is
Ohhh right so what you're saying is that the people (i.e. people who were living in the UK and went through the UK educatio system) are forced to go abroad i.e. it is not by choice they only do so because they do not have the grades.

Right, so if all the people who did not get the A level grades had the finances to go abroad do you think the majority of them would i.e. the main reason potential medics end up doing pharmacy/op/biomed is because they could not afford to go and do medicine abroad or would rather be in the UK doing something they aren't so passionate about rather than doing something they are passionate about but in an unknown territory ?
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bertstare
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Usually because of lack of grades, or if they were kicked out of medical/dental school here, but there are obviously exceptions
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Amphiprion
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(Original post by alevelzzz)
He said health professional course....
In reference to:

"as opposed to applying for an undergraduate course allied to medicine then going for postgraduate entry medicine?"

By "health professional course" they were referring to a degree like Biomedical science or something similar I think.
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username1472093
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(Original post by ChocInABox)
Ohhh right so what you're saying is that the people (i.e. people who were living in the UK and went through the UK educatio system) are forced to go abroad i.e. it is not by choice they only do so because they do not have the grades.

Right, so if all the people who did not get the A level grades had the finances to go abroad do you think the majority of them would i.e. the main reason potential medics end up doing pharmacy/op/biomed is because they could not afford to go and do medicine abroad or would rather be in the UK doing something they aren't so passionate about rather than doing something they are passionate about but in an unknown territory ?
Well tbh, no matter how passionate you are about medicine or dentistry - spending 5 years of your youth life in a second world country such as bulgaria or romania isn't great....
After medicine/dentistry, you don't really have any options that are even closely as good in terms of scope of practice, salary and job security - theres a massive drop between medicine/dentistry and the others.
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username1472093
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(Original post by Amphiprion)
In reference to:

"as opposed to applying for an undergraduate course allied to medicine then going for postgraduate entry medicine?"

By "health professional course" they were referring to a degree like Biomedical science or something similar I think.
Biomedical science is not a health professional course dawg.
He was referring to people who study pharmacy, optometry etc just to go onto graduate entry dentistry or medicine.
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Ronove
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(Original post by ChocInABox)
Would you say its a scummy thing to do because there is no guarantee of GEM and the person is unlikely to be happy if they are just applying for it as a route into medicine?

(Original post by Amphiprion)
If you can deal with the debt of two degrees why is it scummy? In the US you have to have done a primary degree before you can begin medicine. I did a Marine Biology BSc first, not actually with the intention of going into medicine specifically but with a view to using it as a springboard into a different science related degree. I wanted to do medicine but had a lot of problems in year 12 and 13 which trashed by A2s.
Because the NHS pays for the tuition partly or even entirely on those courses with the intention that they get a health professional out of it. If you do it only with the intention of it getting you into GEM, you've wasted their money and deprived them of a health professional (and stopped someone else becoming that health professional).
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Amphiprion
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(Original post by alevelzzz)
Biomedical science is not a health professional course dawg.
He was referring to people who study pharmacy, optometry etc just to go onto graduate entry dentistry or medicine.
I know, "allied to medicine" is a bit vague though. The impression I got was OP was considering applying for a sort of related to medicine degree and then going for grad entry after. As opposed to training as a professional and then switching to medicine outright.

I've been wrong before though.
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Amphiprion
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(Original post by Ronove)
Because the NHS pays for the tuition partly or even entirely on those courses with the intention that they get a health professional out of it. If you do it only with the intention of it getting you into GEM, you've wasted their money and deprived them of a health professional (and stopped someone else becoming that health professional).
Impression I got was he was considering a course like biomed or something and then GEM after. OP said "allied to medicine", bit vague, I know people who have done biomed and chemistry and then switched to GEM which is why I assumed that off the bat. You've interpreted it differentley. Wires got crossed
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ChocInABox
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(Original post by Ronove)
Because the NHS pays for the tuition partly or even entirely on those courses with the intention that they get a health professional out of it. If you do it only with the intention of it getting you into GEM, you've wasted their money and deprived them of a health professional (and stopped someone else becoming that health professional).
wow didn't actually know that
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username1472093
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(Original post by Amphiprion)
I know, "allied to medicine" is a bit vague though. The impression I got was OP was considering applying for a sort of related to medicine degree and then going for grad entry after. As opposed to training as a professional and then switching to medicine outright.

I've been wrong before though.
No I think he meant training as a health professional then going into medicine/dentistry.
Although, there are some people who do medicine THEN dentistry, but thats for completely different reasons
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maria-z
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I am studying abroad and I think it was one of the best decisions I ever made. 40% of the UK's doctors are hired from abroad.

I was born and bred in the UK and so are a few of my classmates. We all intend to return to the UK and practice. Would you not prefer a larger percentage of doctors that know and understand british culture.

When doing summer placements in the UK, our knowledge is on par with UK medical school students. Our study is more self directed however the level of detail to which we learn is equal. A lot of us are taking USMLE exams as well which are internationally renowned.

So when you ask why do we go abroad?

Yes we have the finances- we don't take student loans therefore we have no debt at the end. Often the studies are much cheaper. I pay 4000 euros a year tuition fees, and 300 euros a month for an apartment which looks like something out the movies.

Yes we love travelling- living on mainland Europe means the opportunity to catch a train to a nearby country is very realistic and for less than half the cost.

And most importantly we go because of the sheer lack of medical student places available in UK.

More than 80% of UK medical applicants are rejected. We just choose another method

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