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    As an international student, would someone please advice on how I can get a medical residency position in UK?
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    (Original post by FZka)
    As an international student, would someone please advice on how I can get a medical residency position in UK?
    Are you a UK/EU citizen? If not, getting an appropriate visa might be the biggest hurdle.
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    (Original post by AnonymousPenguin)
    Are you a UK/EU citizen? If not, getting an appropriate visa might be the biggest hurdle.
    No I'm not. Really? Why would that be a problem?

    Actually at this point what is confusing me is what is the difference between a provisional registration and a full registration?
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    (Original post by FZka)
    No I'm not. Really? Why would that be a problem?

    Actually at this point what is confusing me is what is the difference between a provisional registration and a full registration?
    Provisional registration is what is given to doctors in the UK in their first year out of medical school. They are only allowed to work and prescribe in hospital and have to complete certain objectives before being allowed full registration. As a new graduate from overseas, you may or may not have to complete a provisional registration year (F1) depending on what you've already done.

    We don't really have "residency" in the same way in the UK - or at least, not by that name. After graduating, all junior doctors complete two "foundation years" (the first one with provisional registration, as above) which contain rotations through various different specialties. There is some scope for choosing jobs you prefer, but it's not hugely flexible. After that, they apply for specialty training, which takes anything from 3 years (for GP) to 8 years+ (mostly surgical specialties, but some medical subspecialties too), at the end of which they will be a consultant. The visa issue raised by AnonymousPenguin refers to the fact that we have a resident labour market test for all our training programmes, so if you are not a UK/EU citizen, particularly if you graduated outside the UK and therefore are not used to "the system," it is very hard to get a training post here. The visa situation has become more complicated in recent years, but unfortunately I don't know anything about it as it's not applicable for me.
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    (Original post by FZka)
    No I'm not. Really? Why would that be a problem?

    Actually at this point what is confusing me is what is the difference between a provisional registration and a full registration?
    http://www.turbervilles.co.uk/blog/5...r-market-test/ (this states doctors are excluded, but that only applies to UK grads)

    The resident labour market test means you can only be offered a job if there are no ("suitable" ) EEA applicants. (exceptions are consultant radiologists, psychiatrists and middle grade paeds). Essentially this means you cannot get a training post if the fill rate for the specialty is 100%, which it is for everything except GP, histopath and perhaps psychiatry. Even then the job won't be in London, but it'll probably be in semi-rural Wales.
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    (Original post by AnonymousPenguin)
    http://www.turbervilles.co.uk/blog/5...r-market-test/ (this states doctors are excluded, but that only applies to UK grads)

    The resident labour market test means you can only be offered a job if there are no ("suitable" ) EEA applicants. (exceptions are consultant radiologists, psychiatrists and middle grade paeds). Essentially this means you cannot get a training post if the fill rate for the specialty is 100%, which it is for everything except GP, histopath and perhaps psychiatry. Even then the job won't be in London, but it'll probably be in semi-rural Wales.

    (Original post by Helenia)
    Provisional registration is what is given to doctors in the UK in their first year out of medical school. They are only allowed to work and prescribe in hospital and have to complete certain objectives before being allowed full registration. As a new graduate from overseas, you may or may not have to complete a provisional registration year (F1) depending on what you've already done.

    We don't really have "residency" in the same way in the UK - or at least, not by that name. After graduating, all junior doctors complete two "foundation years" (the first one with provisional registration, as above) which contain rotations through various different specialties. There is some scope for choosing jobs you prefer, but it's not hugely flexible. After that, they apply for specialty training, which takes anything from 3 years (for GP) to 8 years+ (mostly surgical specialties, but some medical subspecialties too), at the end of which they will be a consultant. The visa issue raised by AnonymousPenguin refers to the fact that we have a resident labour market test for all our training programmes, so if you are not a UK/EU citizen, particularly if you graduated outside the UK and therefore are not used to "the system," it is very hard to get a training post here. The visa situation has become more complicated in recent years, but unfortunately I don't know anything about it as it's not applicable for me.
    So if I got it correctly, this means that it might be possible for me as an international student to get into the first two year foundation programme but then it would be difficult to get a speciality position unless it was in the field of radiology/psychiatry/ paediatrics?
    Or does it mean that it would be difficult for me to get into the foundation programme in the first place?
    Also, I was wondering If hypothetically speaking I finished the first two years of foundation training and and I didin't get lucky with the RLMT, what would happen next?
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    (Original post by FZka)
    So if I got it correctly, this means that it might be possible for me as an international student to get into the first two year foundation programme but then it would be difficult to get a speciality position unless it was in the field of radiology/psychiatry/ paediatrics?
    Or does it mean that it would be difficult for me to get into the foundation programme in the first place?
    Also, I was wondering If hypothetically speaking I finished the first two years of foundation training and and I didin't get lucky with the RLMT, what would happen next?
    This is off the cuff but this is what I think the situation is:
    1. You would really struggle to get on the foundation programme, it is oversubscribed and has a lot of specific requirements even if you have the right to work.
    2. You could get foundation-level (F2/SHO) jobs that aren't over-subscribed. Think A&E/EM in Wales. They probably wouldn't be training jobs, but I am vaguely told you can fulfill foundation competencies in these LAS jobs (locally appointed service).
    3. For specialty training after a LAS post I think you would struggle because of visa issues. The shortages I listed are at more senior level, so radiology and paeds are very likely off the table. You would have to think of undersubscribed training schemes that will pass the RLMT. GP up north or in Wales is definitely undersubscribed, as I said psych and histopath might be as well, but I wouldn't bet on it.
    4. Instead of specialty training you could probably become a staff grade doctor and then eventually get to an associate specialist or even get CESR this way. This is a super murky area that I don't know much about, but it would probably take longer than specialty training and would require you to find undersubscribed locally appointed jobs. These would probably be mainly available in A&E/EM/psych, but you would have to research NHS jobs to find out more.

    Essentially, AFAIK, when training schemes changed in 2007 there was a glut of doctors and IMGs were essentially shut out. If you are an IMG in the UK, you will have to take a job that absolutely no-one from the entire EU wants.
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    (Original post by AnonymousPenguin)
    Are you a UK/EU citizen? If not, getting an appropriate visa might be the biggest hurdle.
    Hello,
    I'm having some difficulties coming across some information about residency in the UK.
    I am an EU citizen IMG and i would reallyy appreciate it if someone could tell me the steps and exams i need to take for residency in the UK.
 
 
 

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