Ask a current student - University of Bath Watch

Kevin De Bruyne
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Ask anything you want to know about being a student a Bath. I can share some of my experiences, but hopefully other students will be kind enough to chip in too! If there are enough people for it, I'll compile a list of students and what they study if people want to ask subject-specific questions.

(Also, for current students a Bath society is in the process of being approved! :woo:)

Ask a first year international management student thread

Ask a second year Psychology (with placement) student thread

FAQs:

What do you think of accommodation?

Review of Eastwood - if you want me to put your review of the accommodation you stayed in, please let me know!
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I stayed in Eastwood as it was the cheapest accommodation there. It was in quite a nice area, lots of grass to sit on and right next to the woods. It was just under a 10 minute walk to the centre of campus and there was a road not too far from most buldings - good for being picked up / dropped off / getting groceries delivered.

I shared with 10 other guys (not something I applied for!). It was quite an experience. I was lucky to have a few level-headed people who understood the importance of having a clean kitchen, bathroom etc and organised these things.

The block consisted of one shared room and 10 single rooms. The shared and single room were on the ground floor, as well as the kitchen, entrance and communal area. There were reports of 'raccoons' clawing at someone's window on the ground floor in our flat, but I'm not sure whether that was true or not.

There was enough fridge space (3 fridges) for us to have 1 shelf each. We also had 1 cupboard each, which was plenty of space. One crafty flatmate also stored stuff above the cupboards. Freezer space, however, worked out to be just shy of 1 shelf per flatmate, so we had to share / use spaces wherever they were, and try not to buy more frozen stuff than we needed to.

The second floor had 4 rooms and a room with 2 showers and a toilet, plus two sinks. The showers were okay - not as much power as I was used to in London but it did the job - and the hot water was great. One shower head did fall off a few times, but we just had to screw that back on.

The third floor had 5 rooms and a toilet plus two sinks. The way the rooms worked out, I was about a 2 second walk from the toilet/sinks so it was practically en suite!

The rooms weren't exactly soundproof - if someone was having a loud party next door or talking in front of the block you could clearly hear it. In the bathroom you could also hear next door if they were loud.

The stairs were some kind of stone and the hallways were small-ish but that wasn't a problem.

My room was an okay size. It came with a desk, a bed, a lamp, a spinny chaira radiator and a wardrobe. My light broke once but was fixed soon enough.

The laundrette could get busy at times but there was another one that wasn't as busy, and also didn't require your library card to enter (Each accommodation has different laundrettes that only they can go to.)

The Parcel Collection Office was handy and under a 5 minute walk away from Eastwood.

All in all it was a pretty nice place and I would love to stay there again.

How does accommodation work?
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Only some people can stay in accommodation (mainly first years and people who meet other criteria here) and you can accommodation in the city. Oldfield Park and Southdown seem to be popular choices. Don't worry, this is all explained in a slideshow you get shown during the first year.
What's the social life like?
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As for the social life, there are over 80 societies (with a few more being added this year like a Live Action group, and a friend is hoping to set up a Bridge society). These societies have socials which can be pretty interesting - like the comedy society is going to see a few comedians from Mock The Week, but sometimes the socials are just getting together and going to a particular bar/club.

There are also a lot of people involved in sports and they do socials as well. It's a good way to make friends, stay fit and stick something on your CV.

There's almost always something going on at the centre of campus - perhaps some SU officers (Students' Union) are there for people to talk to, or a society is raising money for charity or selling things, people advertising theatre productions, companies like EY setting up stands and talking to people, occasionally some singing and dancing.

The SU has a few things going on during the week - a quiz and a few themed nights. There's also happy hour and some snooker tables/darts, which are pretty busy most of the time! They also show football matches/rugby from time to time, and the atmosphere is incredible, though it can get really, really packed.

In town there's a nice ODEON Cinema as well as a smaller independent one. There's also a Nandos and some other fast food chains, a place called Komedia, as well as loads of shops and bars (Belushi's and Molloy's seem to be popular). There are a few options for clubbing, like XL, Bridge and Weir Lounge (which may have been renamed). Bristol is not too far away so if you wanted to you could hop on a train and go there for a night out.

Almost all of the people I've met are nice/friendly people as well.
What eateries are there?
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Placements - what are they like?
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A lot of courses have the option of doing a year in industry. You aren't guaranteed a placement, and if you don't find one you just go on to your next year of studies. It involves applying, doing tests online, telephone interviews, assessment centres, face to face interviews, some combination of those things, and if you're unlucky (or going for a really good placement) all of those things.

The benefits: Work experience. Invaluable! And you'll really get to know whether that kind of thing is what you want to do in the future.

Getting a feel for the working life: Preparing for life after graduation, getting used to 9 to 6, working with teams, going to socials/doing sports activities within the company.

Pay: A lot of placements you get paid for, depending on what the role is and where. Some offer up to £20,000 for the year!

If they're impressed by you, they may offer you a graduate job when you're finished with university.

You gain lots of skills which will be useful for the future.

Negatives: A few people find that they don't want to come back to the third year to study!

I am in the process for applying for a placement so I don't have any personal experience yet.
What's Bath like?

My brief take on it, anyone else is welcome to pitch in too!
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Bath as a city is pretty good. It attracts a lot of tourists and there are some really talented street performers in town. There's a racecourse and a rugby ground in Bath as well as a golf course right next to the university. There are plenty of places to lock up a bike and the buses are pretty handy - though some don't run on Sunday, possibly Saturday as well. There are plenty of places to eat, shop etc. Things can get a bit expensive, apparently, but I can't tell as my parents usually do the shopping back home.

The uni itself is lovely. There's a lake directly opposite of the library, where as long as it's not winter, people can sit by it and have lunch or hang out. There's two convenience stores, a post office, a Santander and another bank (Barclay? I've walked past it a lot of times), a good selection of eateries, a Costa, a massive place called the Sports Training Village, one or two places equipped with a few games consoles, a bar with a few snooker tables and darts,and most of these things are along something called The Parade, the centre being in front of the library where people are usually advertising things (like theatre productions, the student paper, selling cakes for charity etc). I'm told that there are over 80 societies which you can explore here.

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You get the opportunity to learn a language while you're here or continue one based on your level, which is pretty handy. I'm studying Japanese for the second year in the row and it's really something I look forward to every week. Did I mention that it's free?

I can't speak for all of the accommodations, but the one I lived in (Eastwood, cheapest accommodation) was very nice and I had very few problems with it. They're all not too far from lectures (apart from the one in the city!) and I'd love to live there again for my second year (it's for first years only :cry2:). If you feel that I've missed out something, let me know.

Advice to Maths applicants:
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There are some reviews of Bath and Maths at Bath in this thread.

They don't normally do interviews unless you've been out of education for a while of they've got something that they feel like they need to talk about.

Visit the place at least once - whether it's an Open Day or an Offer Holders' day. You'll get a feel for the campus/uni/staff etc and be able to decide whether it's for you or not.

If you do end up coming to Bath, you'll realise that it's worth switching to a course called 'Mathematical Sciences' rather than 'Mathematics' but not to worry, as for the first year they do exactly the same modules and you get the opportunity to switch - but MathSci is just such a better course than Mathematics.

Before I came to university I didn't really know what Algebra/Analysis was, and I found that I dislike Algebra. Thankfully the MathSci course lets you drop it after the first semester of Year 2. So look at courses carefully and think about what you'd actually enjoy.

My AS grades were AABB in Maths, Physics, Chemistry and English Literature.

My A2 grades were predicted A*AAA in Maths, Physics, Further Maths, Chemistry and achieved A*AAB in the same order.

My offer was A*AA in Maths, Further Maths and any 3rd subject or A*AB and a 2 in any STEP (but I didn't sit that in the end )

If there#s anything else, let me know.

Otherwise, best of luck with your applications!
For students that go to bath, how was it like on the first week, was it easier to mix in or was it 'cliquey'? Are there lots of extracurricular student activities to do?
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The first week of the first year was quite daunting. I remember that on my first night, some of us in our flat played cards and got to know eachother a bit and it wasn't too bad.

Then Freshers' week was just packed with stuff to do. You get a team of second years that give you tours during the day and then parties at night. They also manage your closest neighbouring flats so you get to meet a group of people pretty quickly. I also remember that people went around writing notes on doors of blocks, inviting them to a party at a particular block, as well as invitations on facebook. And after a while, everyone seems to have mixed in pretty well. People were going off to all of the different accommodations that were hosting pre drinks. And through the nightlife it's always possible to meet new people.

On my course (Maths) however, groups formed very quickly and within a few weeks people were either sitting on their own or in groups of 2-3 or 4-5. But I think that's largely to do with what Maths students are like and not the uni.

There are loads of ways to get involved. There are over 80 societies (or so I'm told) and there's something for everyone. Be it acting, writing, baking, singing, you name it.
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jacobe
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I read in another thread you're studying maths, how often do you work outside of lecturing times?
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President Snow
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(Original post by jacobe)
I read in another thread you're studying maths, how often do you work outside of lecturing times?
I'm sure Sean will give you his own answer. But I'm another current second year maths student and I guess two answers is better than one!

Split over five compulsory modules, each module has per week (some slight variation, but this is the gist of it):

Two hours of big lectures
One hour of big problems class (lecturer does examples on the board)
One problem sheet (homework for you to do in your own time)
One hour of small class size (~10-15 persons) tutorials where the tutor goes through the problem sheet and you get a chance to ask questions.

This means that overall you get five problem sheets a week to work on. This averages out to one each weekday night (or five on Sunday evening if you're that way inclined )

It's usually possible to bash out a scrappy attempt on the compulsory questions in under an hour. I was always a conscientious student aiming for a high first and nothing less (which I did eventually achieve), and would spend an average of about four hours on each problem sheet, doing both the optional and compulsory questions and making the very best job I could of it. I would do essentially one each weekday night, then revisit on Saturday morning any questions I had failed to complete during the week. Oftentimes fresh eyes meant I was able to quickly tick them off second time around and learnt a lot from the process and second viewing.

This in general gave me the entire weekend off. Bath does not work us very hard. Seriously, don't worry about it
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by jacobe)
I read in another thread you're studying maths, how often do you work outside of lecturing times?
I haven't got a huge amount to add to President Snow's answer as he has summed it up pretty well.

I remember being told during an induction lecture that for this course, for every contact hour you have you're expected to put an equal amount in, and we had about 21 contact hours.

I was the type to not really try on problem sheets, maybe giving the majority 30 minutes to an hour. Some, I spent a lot more looking at questions, looking at notes and looking at the questions again as well as going to the workshops. Others, I gave about 5 minutes (often the day it was due in) before giving up. But that was a mistake, and if I could go back I'd seriously attempt each question on each sheet to get feedback and learn.

For the computing coursework I usually spent double the amount of recommended time. I recall one or two weekends spent purely on the coursework, a lot of that consisting of me pacing about the flat (and other people's rooms!) trying to figure it out.

And as for when I started revision, maybe a few weeks before the exam period. Looking back, maybe a better strategy would've been going over the notes on the day and practicing a few questions, so that come revision I'm not trying to relearn the module.

I think that this course rewards people who put in the effort, the people who don't can kind of get by and rely on cramming / ability, and I found myself somewhere inbetween last year.
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jerseyalevel
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Hi I'm considering applying to bath to study biological sciences or biochemistry What is the accommodation on the campus like? And also what's the night life/ social aspect like?


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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by jerseyalevel)
Hi I'm considering applying to bath to study biological sciences or biochemistry What is the accommodation on the campus like? And also what's the night life/ social aspect like?


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Hi there

I posted on this thread a while back with a review of Eastwood, the accommodation I stayed in. Looking through it there are some reviews of the other student accommodations, and the ones I've seen look much nicer than it and haven't heard of anyone having any problems.

Apparently there are over 80 societies (I haven't counted them myself) but there is something for everyone. Almost everyone I've met are very nice/interesting people.

I'd be lying if I said I knew a huge amount about clubbing, but there are loads of options, both on the campus and in the city.

The SU holds a few different events throughout the week, have happy hours and show rugby/football matches when they're on and they are nice to go to. There are also clubs in the city like XL, Bridge and The Weir Lounge. Bristol is fairly close as well, so there'll be a few more options there.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by turiga28)
What is university of bath like?is the social life good?and the overall teaching?what is the area like?
I've just started my teaching year and found that the teaching in the first year overall was very good, and most of the course content (for Maths) was interesting to me. The area is safe, lovely and expensive. The campus is amazing. :love:

It is quite sporty and the amount of talent in the sports societies is amazing. But one of my friends organised 5-a-side football where no one was really a pro but it was great fun. There are loads of chances to socialise (through society socials and events on the campus and clubs in the city) but there are loads of other things to do that don't involve sports or drinking, particularly during Freshers'.
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Lemonpopsicle2
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(Original post by jerseyalevel)
Hi I'm considering applying to bath to study biological sciences or biochemistry What is the accommodation on the campus like? And also what's the night life/ social aspect like?


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My son has just started his second year at Bath studying Biological Sciences, he absolutely loves the course, Bath, the social life, actually he loves everything!
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woo32
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So many people stay in/around bath after they leave uni? or move to Bristol ect? thanks:-)
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by woo32)
So many people stay in/around bath after they leave uni? or move to Bristol ect? thanks:-)
It's not unheard of, though I don't have any numbers.

Bath is a lovely place - I like it, but I think it's too expensive to live in.
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Crazyjoesmith
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When I go to university I hope to take my bike with me, would you say the campus is safe enough to do that ? Or would you reccomend I get a foldable bike ?
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President Snow
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(Original post by Crazyjoesmith)
When I go to university I hope to take my bike with me, would you say the campus is safe enough to do that ? Or would you reccomend I get a foldable bike ?
Campus is safe enough. Obviously bring a lock, and there are free cycle lockers available for your stuff, but lots of people cycle (including me sometimes) and it works out just great!
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Crazyjoesmith
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(Original post by President Snow)
Campus is safe enough. Obviously bring a lock, and there are free cycle lockers available for your stuff, but lots of people cycle (including me sometimes) and it works out just great!
Thank you 😊
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Crazyjoesmith)
When I go to university I hope to take my bike with me, would you say the campus is safe enough to do that ? Or would you reccomend I get a foldable bike ?
This page may be of interest to you. There are loads of places to lock your bike (and people use the racks) but you can also apply for secure bike shed access if you wish.

But think about how much use you'd get out of it - if you're living in the city, fair enough. But you might find that you hardly ever need to use it.

Plus it's all a bit hilly! I've cycled to the uni and it was pretty tough at times.
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Crazyjoesmith
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(Original post by SeanFM)
This page may be of interest to you. There are loads of places to lock your bike (and people use the racks) but you can also apply for secure bike shed access if you wish.

But think about how much use you'd get out of it - if you're living in the city, fair enough. But you might find that you hardly ever need to use it.

Plus it's all a bit hilly! I've cycled to the uni and it was pretty tough at times.
Thank you for the page link and I get what your saying that hill looks mad. However I'm not a big fan of the bus so I would rather ride around the city. I find using my bike can be slightly easier in a city.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Crazyjoesmith)
Thank you for the page link and I get what your saying that hill looks mad. However I'm not a big fan of the bus so I would rather ride around the city. I find using my bike can be slightly easier in a city.
I get what you mean!
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Tooly)
Hi

I saw you're a current student at Bath and was hoping you could answer a few questions whenever you get time? I was just wondering what second year+ accommodation is like, what do most people do? When I visited I didn't seem to notice many areas with houses that are affordable to students, so am just curious!Also do people tend to visit Bristol a lot for the social aspect? Or is there enough to do in Bath anyways?

Thanks for your time :P
Hey there

There'll be an evening where some staff show you powerpoints and talk about finding accommodation and explain most things to you.

After the first year you can't live on campus, so you have to find friends in the first year that you want to live in, look for a property together, set up bills closer to the time etc. People can also look for strangers if they're desperate to share, I've seen a few Facebook posts advertising rooms or looking for flatmates.

I live at the start of a bus route that goes to the university - an area called Southdown - and the bus ride is about 20-25 minutes long and comes every half hour. So the location is pretty good, but I'd much rather prefer that it was at the bottom of the hill that the university is on and walk up every day. It's £380 a month for rent and then there's a bit more for bills and things like that. From what I know, Southdown and another place called Oldfield Park are where students tend to congregate. Oldfield Park is a bit closer to the city centre, but the two areas aren't that far from eachother anyway - maybe a 10 minute walk between the two.

People can and do go for a night out in Bristol as it's not too far, but there are plenty of things going on in the city as well as on campus for nights out. I could list them all but if you're into this sort of thing then you'll quickly become acquainted with where people go to on which night.

If there's anything else you're more than welcome to ask.
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Crazyjoesmith
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Why is the rent so high in bath ? Is it that high in most areas or just there ? 😊
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Kevin De Bruyne
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(Original post by Crazyjoesmith)
Why is the rent so high in bath ? Is it that high in most areas or just there ? 😊
Bath is quite an expensive place to live in. It's a World Heritage Site, has lots of things to attract tourists etc. The place I'm staying at is £90 a week.
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Kevin De Bruyne
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This generally isn't a thread for chancing people on whether they'd get an offer or not (it may be worth asking in the official rep thread) but I thought I'd put a question here that I saw on another thread.

(Original post by Honey badger123)
AAB at AS, predicted A*AAA for A2 (taking an AS in further maths) any shot for an offer for maths at Bath?
I got AABB at AS, was predicted A*AAA at A2 (including Further Maths AS + A2 in Year 13) and got an offer, so you're kind of similar to me.

If you look here it says:

AS Further Maths:

For applicants taking A-level Maths and AS Further Maths and STEP/AEA a typical offer is:
  • obtain grade A* in A-level Maths, grades A A in two further A-level subjects and grade A in AS Further Maths plus at least 2/Merit in one STEP/AEA Maths paper.
So you'll need to sit an extra exam and get a certain grade in it.

I'd advise studying AS and A2 in one year as it's probably the easier option and if you're good enough to do Maths at Bath an A in Further Maths shouldn't be too tough.

Good luck!
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