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    I studied and completed my first year of Mathematics at Warwick, and got a first. I have transferred universities to Manchester where I'll be doing my second, third and possibly fourth year. I transferred because I wasn't settling in too well at Warwick, and Manchester is my home town and all my friends are here as well as other personal reasons.

    I am confident I could get a first from either university, but my question is how much are employers going to take into account where you got your degree from? Would it make that much difference when I'm at a job interview if I had a first from Manchester or Warwick? I'm worried that I have made the wrong decision in transferring and I should just have stuck it out a couple of more years at Warwick. (I loved the course there, just wasn't settling in well)
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    (Original post by LPSteve)
    I studied and completed my first year of Mathematics at Warwick, and got a first. I have transferred universities to Manchester where I'll be doing my second, third and possibly fourth year. I transferred because I wasn't settling in too well at Warwick, and Manchester is my home town and all my friends are here as well as other personal reasons.

    I am confident I could get a first from either university, but my question is how much are employers going to take into account where you got your degree from? Would it make that much difference when I'm at a job interview if I had a first from Manchester or Warwick?
    In theory, no. I'd imagine the name of the university(so long as it's good) is inferior in importantance to degree class, interview, experience, A Levels and probably even GCSEs. A girl I'm friends with rejected an Oxford offer for Law and chose Cardiff because she wanted to stay close to her family. She had 11A* and 4A* at A Level. Does that mean an Oxford graduate is going to be preferred to her if they both have the same degree class? No. (Unless the Oxford graduate has a comparable academic record, experience and good interview).
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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    In theory, no. I'd imagine the name of the university(so long as it's good) is inferior in importantance to degree class, interview, experience, A Levels and probably even GCSEs. A girl I'm friends with rejected an Oxford offer for Law and chose Cardiff because she wanted to stay close to her family. She had 11A* and 4A* at A Level. Does that mean an Oxford graduate is going to be preferred to her if they both have the same degree class? No. (Unless the Oxford graduate has a comparable academic record, experience and good interview).
    This^

    Way more variables at play than just uni name.

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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    In theory, no. I'd imagine the name of the university(so long as it's good) is inferior in importantance to degree class, interview, experience, A Levels and probably even GCSEs. A girl I'm friends with rejected an Oxford offer for Law and chose Cardiff because she wanted to stay close to her family. She had 11A* and 4A* at A Level. Does that mean an Oxford graduate is going to be preferred to her if they both have the same degree class? No. (Unless the Oxford graduate has a comparable academic record, experience and good interview).
    Does the university you go to not determine the difficulty of the course and the exams you do though? I've seen many people say that a 2.1 from Oxbridge is better than a 1.1 from a uni regarding as being lower rated.
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    Unfortunately it doesn't seem like it does matter, which is a small problem for me.

    This is going to be an unpopular opinion, but in my personal view it's not fair that students at Warwick - and I'm sure other universities like Cambridge - have to put themselves through an incredibly rigorous mathematics course only for it to have no difference in the end.
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    (Original post by Ano9901whichone)
    Does the university you go to not determine the difficulty of the course and the exams you do though? I've seen many people say that a 2.1 from Oxbridge is better than a 1.1 from a uni regarding as being lower rated.
    Yes but how is it relevant to getting a graduate job? A 2:1 or 1st is literally just the baseline to even get considered.

    And note the previous poster chose his words right 'so long as it's from a good uni', Manchester has an excellent maths department

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    (Original post by LPSteve)
    I studied and completed my first year of Mathematics at Warwick, and got a first. I have transferred universities to Manchester where I'll be doing my second, third and possibly fourth year. I transferred because I wasn't settling in too well at Warwick, and Manchester is my home town and all my friends are here as well as other personal reasons.

    I am confident I could get a first from either university, but my question is how much are employers going to take into account where you got your degree from? Would it make that much difference when I'm at a job interview if I had a first from Manchester or Warwick? I'm worried that I have made the wrong decision in transferring and I should just have stuck it out a couple of more years at Warwick. (I loved the course there, just wasn't settling in well)
    It can make a difference if you are talking about the top of the university scale and the bottom and also depending on course. There will be no material difference between maths at Manchester and Warwick.
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    (Original post by Paraphilos)
    Unfortunately it doesn't seem like it does matter, which is a small problem for me.

    This is going to be an unpopular opinion, but in my personal view it's not fair that students at Warwick - and I'm sure other universities like Cambridge - have to put themselves through an incredibly rigorous mathematics course only for it to have no difference in the end.
    The world isn't fair. As a student at Warwick or Cambridge, you're literally bombarded with constant employer presentations, special networking events, research opportunities people at some other universities could only dream of. All of this makes life easier, even if the degree itself is more difficult.

    To add, it actually does make quite a lot of difference in some specialised roles - especially at quantitative finance firms

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    (Original post by Ano9901whichone)
    Does the university you go to not determine the difficulty of the course and the exams you do though? I've seen many people say that a 2.1 from Oxbridge is better than a 1.1 from a uni regarding as being lower rated.
    Oxbridge degrees are more difficult. I don't think it's that much more difficult in making a difference of a WHOLE grade...
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    There seems to be some rampant grade inflation at some universities with regards to first class degrees.

    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/subjects/stu...eturnTo/Search

    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/subjects/stu...eturnTo/Search

    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/subjects/stu...eturnTo/Search


    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/subjects/stu...eturnTo/Search

    UCL - around 52% getting first class in maths

    Oxford - around 40%

    Warwick - around 30%

    Cambridge - around 30% (if distinction is equal to first class, otherwise, around 10%)
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    The world isn't fair. As a student at Warwick or Cambridge, you're literally bombarded with constant employer presentations, special networking events, research opportunities people at some other universities could only dream of. All of this makes life easier, even if the degree itself is more difficult.

    To add, it actually does make quite a lot of difference in some specialised roles - especially at quantitative finance firms

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    True. That is a good point and whilst I was at Warwick I never took advantage of that opportunity; although I'd say that it's not easy for maths students to understand what their future career ought to be. From personal experience, a large portion have no clue.

    It's just a little sad. I had quite a few course mates who absolutely excelled in their A levels - I'm talking 3A*'s + STEP standard - and then crumble in the end because the course was so challenging. Indeed, it's not surprising that the percentage of 2.2s/thirds amounts to something greater than 30%. For them, essentially, the message presumably is that they should have chosen a lower ranked university? Bit late for that once you've signed up for it.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    It can make a difference if you are talking about the top of the university scale and the bottom and also depending on course. There will be no material difference between maths at Manchester and Warwick.
    I agree with this. Employers will make legitimate assumptions based on your university, but Warwick and Manchester are a similar ballpark so the transition won't hurt.

    Just make sure you are able to explain your reasons for switching convincingly in an interview, and they won't think anything of it.
 
 
 
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