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ucas rank or guardian rank

I've been looking at the ucas ranking for universities to get a rough idea abt them, ik its nit all abt the rankings but when i go and look at the list the guardian posted, some universities that are at the top, are at the bottom. I'm looking at computer science for both - it's not like im doing different subjects but some universities have just dropped by loads. They're both league tables for 2024. The guardian does take more factors into account but i'm probably looking at this the wrong way bc theres no way that universities can be 50 places apart?

Ur telling me that WARWICK on ucas for computer science is 11th but the guardian has placed it at 75th?
Reply 1
Original post by Anonymous
I've been looking at the ucas ranking for universities to get a rough idea abt them, ik its nit all abt the rankings but when i go and look at the list the guardian posted, some universities that are at the top, are at the bottom. I'm looking at computer science for both - it's not like im doing different subjects but some universities have just dropped by loads. They're both league tables for 2024. The guardian does take more factors into account but i'm probably looking at this the wrong way bc theres no way that universities can be 50 places apart?

Ur telling me that WARWICK on ucas for computer science is 11th but the guardian has placed it at 75th?

these r the links for anyone wondering

https://www.theguardian.com/education/ng-interactive/2023/sep/09/the-guardian-university-guide-2024-the-rankings

https://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/league-tables/rankings
Original post by Anonymous
I've been looking at the ucas ranking for universities to get a rough idea abt them, ik its nit all abt the rankings but when i go and look at the list the guardian posted, some universities that are at the top, are at the bottom. I'm looking at computer science for both - it's not like im doing different subjects but some universities have just dropped by loads. They're both league tables for 2024. The guardian does take more factors into account but i'm probably looking at this the wrong way bc theres no way that universities can be 50 places apart?

Ur telling me that WARWICK on ucas for computer science is 11th but the guardian has placed it at 75th?


Ucas publish league tables?
Neither, as I wouldn’t bother with university rankings unless you’re looking to go into Law or Investment Banking I think.

Pick a course that you’ll enjoy and that has decent employability prospects/placements, forget about rankings in my opinion.
Original post by ageshallnot
Ucas publish league tables?


Maybe they mean The Complete University Guide instead :dontknow:.
Reply 5
Original post by ageshallnot
Ucas publish league tables?


opps no i meant university leage guide
Original post by Anonymous
opps no i meant university leage guide


Aha!

Well, what does common sense tell you, particularly about the Guardian rankings?
From a quick look, it appears that CS at Warwick is respected and has fairly good career prospects and entry standards, but it has much lower student satisfaction rates. Thus, it depends on what is important to you. Rankings should be taken with a pinch of salt either way
(edited 3 months ago)
Original post by Anonymous
I've been looking at the ucas ranking for universities to get a rough idea abt them, ik its nit all abt the rankings but when i go and look at the list the guardian posted, some universities that are at the top, are at the bottom. I'm looking at computer science for both - it's not like im doing different subjects but some universities have just dropped by loads. They're both league tables for 2024. The guardian does take more factors into account but i'm probably looking at this the wrong way bc theres no way that universities can be 50 places apart?

Ur telling me that WARWICK on ucas for computer science is 11th but the guardian has placed it at 75th?


Rankings are simply an arbitrary tool using very generic methodology & flawed underlying data to compare universities.

they exist because people (such as yourself) will go click on them driving internet traffic, and making them money. They are not a fair, objective or sensible way to pick your university choices.
Sure use they as a guide but as others have said they really are there to drive traffic to websites and unless you have a super competitive course then they are not that useful. Have you looked at other tables such as University sustainability? University growth? There are so many different league tables out there for all sorts of things.

For example, we are currently number 1 for graduates in employment, but this wouldn't be reflected on your league tables...

Choose a course that you will enjoy and be passionate about. I achieved higher in my BSc and MSc because I was studying at a place I wanted to be at and have since made it home as well! There is FAR more to choosing a good university than just league tables.
(edited 3 months ago)
Original post by CCCU Official

For example, we are currently number 1 for graduates in employment, but this wouldn't be reflected on your league tables...

How have you measured this?

(graduate salary?, Number of graduates in management positions in FTSE100 companies?, number of graduates in the times 100 graduate employers?)
(edited 3 months ago)
Original post by mnot
How have you measured this?

(graduate salary?, Number of graduates in management positions in FTSE100 companies?, number of graduates in the times 100 graduate employers?)

I was going to ask this as well.
Original post by Anonymous
I've been looking at the ucas ranking for universities to get a rough idea abt them, ik its nit all abt the rankings but when i go and look at the list the guardian posted, some universities that are at the top, are at the bottom. I'm looking at computer science for both - it's not like im doing different subjects but some universities have just dropped by loads. They're both league tables for 2024. The guardian does take more factors into account but i'm probably looking at this the wrong way bc theres no way that universities can be 50 places apart?

Ur telling me that WARWICK on ucas for computer science is 11th but the guardian has placed it at 75th?

Hi,

University rankings are confusing and as there is not much to go off of when choosing your degree I understand why a lot of people use them. However, I do see that you know rankings are not everything.

Other ways to tell if the university is for you could be by visiting them for open days. At the open days you can talk to staff and students and ask them how they find the university. Your day to day experience is more important in my opinion than where the university ranks. As you are visiting these places, consider whether they have the facilities to support your extra-curricular interests such as sport or societies you would want to join.

I hope this helps and good luck!

Alia
University of Kent Student Rep
Original post by mnot
How have you measured this?

(graduate salary?, Number of graduates in management positions in FTSE100 companies?, number of graduates in the times 100 graduate employers?)


Original post by Talkative Toad
I was going to ask this as well.

Hey both! Sorry the original post was meant to have that stat hyperlinked to a page explaining it further, I have edited the post now! :smile:
Original post by CCCU Official
Hey both! Sorry the original post was meant to have that stat hyperlinked to a page explaining it further, I have edited the post now! :smile:


Id argue claiming to be the number 1 university is a significant jump from having the the most students employed after 15 months of graduation.

Especially considering the cited data is already two years out of date (and covid entangled), id note many large universities also have extensive research and postgraduate networks with funding (who aren’t employed) as such this would further warp the data. I also think it’s (significantly more) important to look at where graduates end up (to be #1). Types of company, early career responsibilities & salary opportunities (and this would be a better markers of the university employability). Particularly when the most competitive jobs often take multiple cycles for a graduate to get there foot in the door. Im not sure on the significance of 15 months versus 6 months or 12 months or 24 months or 36 months.

Of course this is classic university PR.

any prospective students: look at the people in roles you want, try and do a wide survey and see the universities, courses, skills & internships they had when applying for graduate roles and what path they took post graduation into the position you think you want.
(edited 3 months ago)
Original post by mnot
Id argue claiming to be the number 1 university is a significant jump from having the the most students employed after 15 months of graduation.

Especially considering the cited data is already two years out of date (and covid entangled), id note many large universities also have extensive research and postgraduate networks with funding (who aren’t employed) as such this would further warp the data. I also think it’s (significantly more) important to look at where graduates end up (to be #1). Types of company, early career responsibilities & salary opportunities (and this would be a better markers of the university employability). Particularly when the most competitive jobs often take multiple cycles for a graduate to get there foot in the door. Im not sure on the significance of 15 months versus 6 months or 12 months or 24 months or 36 months.

Of course this is classic university PR.

any prospective students: look at the people in roles you want, try and do a wide survey and see the universities, courses, skills & internships they had when applying for graduate roles and what path they took post graduation into the position you think you want.


I don't disagree with you on the whole, the point was that every league table and statistic can be broken down and can be used as a guide but the key is going to a university which supports you and can get you to where you want to be, and this is different for every single person and every stat and league tables importance is different for everyone as well.

Also all good points of things to look out for, from experience I would also add that even if a course looks identical on paper it's worth taking a look at the assessment methods as it may favour/hinder you. I personally really struggled with timed exams so made sure the course offered more essay assessments than exams which was a life saver! Someone did the same accredited course at a different university and they had timed essays for the same modules which would be my worst nightmare! As I said though, every single one of us is looking for different things when applying so just some advice :smile:
Original post by Anonymous
I've been looking at the ucas ranking for universities to get a rough idea abt them, ik its nit all abt the rankings but when i go and look at the list the guardian posted, some universities that are at the top, are at the bottom. I'm looking at computer science for both - it's not like im doing different subjects but some universities have just dropped by loads. They're both league tables for 2024. The guardian does take more factors into account but i'm probably looking at this the wrong way bc theres no way that universities can be 50 places apart?

Ur telling me that WARWICK on ucas for computer science is 11th but the guardian has placed it at 75th?


Hi!

University rankings are a difficult one to navigate. They take so many different things into account depending on the list. Personally, when I was looking into applying to universities I used the complete university guide as I found the website the easiest to use however where the university places on these rankings though isn't all too important in the grand scheme of things.

The way I went about looking for what university course was using the complete university guide, filtering by the subject I wanted to take (computer science) and then scrolling down and looking into each university. So I used the rankings more as a checklist to note down what number I got to on the list and make sure I wasn't missing any.

When I got onto the actual university site I would search to make sure they had the course I wanted (for me as I wanted my course to be computer science with AI that knocked out quite a few places as it's a little more niche), if they did check the entry requirements to make sure they might be achievable for myself. Then I would look into the course modules to see if it taught the things I wanted to learn and also the percentage of coursework vs exams. If it passed those two stages then the real fun would begin :smile:

I would then check location - I wanted to be near a city with lots of things going on but maybe you want to be near nature or have access to many hiking routes. I would read reviews by students on WhatUni or similar websites and then look into accommodation, clubs, and what the student union is like - I'd try and find YouTube videos of people looking at all of this.

With all of that done I would then decide to put on my list of universities to look at again later or let that one go.

Basically, it's a long process. My main piece of advice would be to go to open days if you can but also trust yourself. Everyone I talk to had a gut instinct about where was right for them. I know this question was more about the rankings than looking at universities but I hope this might help a little! If you have any questions please feel free to ask! :smile:

- Jessica
2nd year, Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence)
Original post by Anonymous
opps no i meant university leage guide


Instead of relying on rankings which mangle together a bunch of random measures go to the Discover Uni website. It holds much more detailed information about individual courses and you can compare courses and decide what strengths and weaknesses are important to you.

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