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Love Island: Does the show have a race, age and body diversity problem? watch

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    Surely the take away from this is that the people on this show are reprehensibly shallow reprobates who should be immediately sent to the wall instead of this nonsense about supposed racism, ageism, fat shaming... I mean as far as complete non events go this "report" really does take the cake.
    [quote

    We're six weeks in, there's been more than 30 contestants and at least 50,000 mentions of the word "loyal".
    But as Love Island continues to keep us hooked there's been an uncomfortable conversation around the show.
    It's all about diversity.
    Some fans have continually questioned why the majority of the cast appear to look the same.
    Leigh-Ann Pinnock from Little Mix waded in on the debate saying she was tempted to switch off because of its lack of diversity.

    Newsbeat has been taking a look at the debate so far.
    'Where are the south Asian women?'

    Image copyrightITV
    More than 85,000 people applied for Love Island this year.
    With such a huge number of singletons to choose from, some fans have questioned why the majority of the contestants picked for the villa have been white.
    Viewers especially criticised the show for a lack of diversity when 12 new contestants arrived on 28 June.
    Some felt producers had missed an opportunity to bring people into Love Island who represent a range of ethnicities.

    Paula Akpan, director of the Black Girl Festival and social media editor at Gal-Dem, says racial diversity on Love Island is "severely lacking".
    "How can you have no south Asian women on the show?" she says.
    "I think if they're seeking to represent the nation or seeking to showcase the different people who generally fall in love or date one another, then Love Island needs to be casting the net wider and it needs to be something that they think about more going forward."
    Figures from the 2011 census show 14% of the population in England and Wales have an ethnic minority background.
    The debate around race and diversity in Love Island has very much focused on contestant Samira - who walked out of the show on Thursday.
    She struggled to find love in the villa and when six new men showed up - not one chose her in the top three women they were attracted to.
    In contrast, some of the female contestants have described their type as "mixed-race men".

    Paula says Samira's experience is a reflection of what dating is like for some black women and is a "difficult watch".
    "It's very real for every black woman watching it because it's something that you become quite used to, especially when you're in white-dominated spaces.
    "You often know that you won't be seen as a person who's attractive especially when you're compared to other beautiful women on the show who embody the Eurocentric ideals."
    Last Tuesday, new singleton Idris entered the villa - but some viewers thought it was a cynical attempt by producers to address an issue that's been around for weeks.

    Do you need to be under 30 to fall in love?
    That's what some fans of the show might think - with the average age of this year's contestants being 24.
    Laura is the oldest contestant at 29 and her age has been a big talking point both inside and outside the villa.


    She originally coupled-up with 20-year-old Wes and the fact she was older than him was massively talked about.
    When contestant Megan, 24, told Wes she also fancied him - Megan pointed out the age gap between Laura and Wes.
    She told him: "I feel like she's a lot older and she said earlier she's in here looking for a husband. To me - you're 20, you're so much fun and I just wanted to know where your head was at."
    On social media, there's been some negative comments and jokes made about Laura's age.

    Blogger Kat Rayment , 29, has discussed Love Island on the podcast The Prosecco Sessions and says the negativity around Laura's age is "unfair".
    "She's a good looking, attractive young woman so why she can't be in the house and be meeting people that are younger than her? I don't see what the issue is and why people feel the need to be so negative to her."
    Kat believes the lack of age diversity in Love Island is "alienating older women" and isn't the "right message to be putting across to the nation".
    She feels the producers should've brought more contestants into the villa who are in their late 20s or early 30s.
    "Different ages make it more interesting, more diverse within the house and then it means you can meet people of different ages that might be better suited to you.
    "It shouldn't just be about being in your 20s and being young, it should be any age really that are looking for love."


    2018 has been the year where body diversity has had more focus - with some brands scrapping airbrushing and promoting bodies of all shapes and sizes.
    But perhaps Love Island producers didn't get the message.
    Pretty much all of the men on this year's show have six-packs while the girls have toned, slim bodies.
    Some fans have questioned why there are no dad-bods or curves in the villa and raised concerns about the way it might make some viewers feel about their image.


    Liam Barnes, 29, from Gloucester, says watching Love Island hasn't made him feel good about how he looks.
    "It's as if the contestants went to the audition and they spoke about themselves and producers went 'Right, what do you look like underneath your clothes?'
    "I'm sure thousands of people applied and auditioned for the show but my feeling is because they didn't have that certain body type or that certain look they didn't get through, which is a bit sad really."
    And while he accepts it's a reality TV show there for entertainment he says the lack of diversity "doesn't feel right in the 21st century".
    "I've spoken to friends about it and how we've all felt inadequate after watching and one jokingly said there should be a 'Chub Island' for us normies.
    "As funny as it was, after a while once you think about it, that shouldn't be the case."

    There has been some defence of Love Island's lack of representation.
    Some fans have pointed out that it's a constructed reality TV show based on "superficial beauty" and suggest it's not its job to reflect society.

    Psychologist Emma Kenny says Love Island isn't necessarily set up to represent a diverse society.
    "That's not to say that it shouldn't be diverse, it's a very shallow programme.
    "While it's got to have depth regarding some of the relationships, for the most part it's about the body beautiful."
    Emma says while there's been criticism of Love Island producers for the lack of diversity, there's the argument that the show is giving its viewers what they want.
    And she says that gives her "a far deeper concern".
    "It suggests that our communities are not accepting potentially of the diversity that our country offers."
    A spokesperson for Love Island told Newsbeat: "When casting for Love Island, we always strive to reflect the age, experiences and diversity of our audience and this year is no exception with a cross section of different personalities and backgrounds in the villa."






    [/quote]
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-44686074
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    The diversity criticism I can understand.

    Age and fatness is just impractical. People generally prefer their own age (or the guy being up to a couple of years older) so having a wide spread is going to be narrowing the options for the people. If you have two people from every decade of life, are you really going to be pairing a 90 year old with a 20 year old? As for fatness, the show is meant to be superficial to start with, you're going to have the fat people immediately at a disadvantage. Sure, there's a fairytale ending in there where two fat people win the thing, but you wouldn't be drawing in an audience with their swimwear photos on billboards regardless.
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    Who on Earth actually wants to see themselves 'represented' on something like Love Island? I'm frankly embarassed that most of them on there are white. If you're sitting there thinking, "hey, why aren't there more members of my ethnicity on this totally mindless and degraded trash TV show?", you probably need to re-evaluate your collective priorities.

    Just so you are all aware, I will bebanning Love Island and any other shows of a similar ilk when I seize power and declare myself Lord Protector for life in the near future.
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    Can’t comment on age or race

    But body diversity abso-fricking-lutely. Goddamn they’ve not had anyone on that show that wasn’t physical perfection. Makes me salty 😂
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    (Original post by Napp)
    Surely the take away from this is that the people on this show are reprehensibly shallow reprobates who should be immediately sent to the wall instead of this nonsense about supposed racism, ageism, fat shaming... I mean as far as complete non events go this "report" really does take the cake.
    [quote

    We're six weeks in, there's been more than 30 contestants and at least 50,000 mentions of the word "loyal".
    But as Love Island continues to keep us hooked there's been an uncomfortable conversation around the show.
    It's all about diversity.
    Some fans have continually questioned why the majority of the cast appear to look the same.
    Leigh-Ann Pinnock from Little Mix waded in on the debate saying she was tempted to switch off because of its lack of diversity.

    Newsbeat has been taking a look at the debate so far.
    'Where are the south Asian women?'

    Image copyrightITV
    More than 85,000 people applied for Love Island this year.
    With such a huge number of singletons to choose from, some fans have questioned why the majority of the contestants picked for the villa have been white.
    Viewers especially criticised the show for a lack of diversity when 12 new contestants arrived on 28 June.
    Some felt producers had missed an opportunity to bring people into Love Island who represent a range of ethnicities.

    Paula Akpan, director of the Black Girl Festival and social media editor at Gal-Dem, says racial diversity on Love Island is "severely lacking".
    "How can you have no south Asian women on the show?" she says.
    "I think if they're seeking to represent the nation or seeking to showcase the different people who generally fall in love or date one another, then Love Island needs to be casting the net wider and it needs to be something that they think about more going forward."
    Figures from the 2011 census show 14% of the population in England and Wales have an ethnic minority background.
    The debate around race and diversity in Love Island has very much focused on contestant Samira - who walked out of the show on Thursday.
    She struggled to find love in the villa and when six new men showed up - not one chose her in the top three women they were attracted to.
    In contrast, some of the female contestants have described their type as "mixed-race men".

    Paula says Samira's experience is a reflection of what dating is like for some black women and is a "difficult watch".
    "It's very real for every black woman watching it because it's something that you become quite used to, especially when you're in white-dominated spaces.
    "You often know that you won't be seen as a person who's attractive especially when you're compared to other beautiful women on the show who embody the Eurocentric ideals."
    Last Tuesday, new singleton Idris entered the villa - but some viewers thought it was a cynical attempt by producers to address an issue that's been around for weeks.

    Do you need to be under 30 to fall in love?
    That's what some fans of the show might think - with the average age of this year's contestants being 24.
    Laura is the oldest contestant at 29 and her age has been a big talking point both inside and outside the villa.


    She originally coupled-up with 20-year-old Wes and the fact she was older than him was massively talked about.
    When contestant Megan, 24, told Wes she also fancied him - Megan pointed out the age gap between Laura and Wes.
    She told him: "I feel like she's a lot older and she said earlier she's in here looking for a husband. To me - you're 20, you're so much fun and I just wanted to know where your head was at."
    On social media, there's been some negative comments and jokes made about Laura's age.

    Blogger Kat Rayment , 29, has discussed Love Island on the podcast The Prosecco Sessions and says the negativity around Laura's age is "unfair".
    "She's a good looking, attractive young woman so why she can't be in the house and be meeting people that are younger than her? I don't see what the issue is and why people feel the need to be so negative to her."
    Kat believes the lack of age diversity in Love Island is "alienating older women" and isn't the "right message to be putting across to the nation".
    She feels the producers should've brought more contestants into the villa who are in their late 20s or early 30s.
    "Different ages make it more interesting, more diverse within the house and then it means you can meet people of different ages that might be better suited to you.
    "It shouldn't just be about being in your 20s and being young, it should be any age really that are looking for love."


    2018 has been the year where body diversity has had more focus - with some brands scrapping airbrushing and promoting bodies of all shapes and sizes.
    But perhaps Love Island producers didn't get the message.
    Pretty much all of the men on this year's show have six-packs while the girls have toned, slim bodies.
    Some fans have questioned why there are no dad-bods or curves in the villa and raised concerns about the way it might make some viewers feel about their image.


    Liam Barnes, 29, from Gloucester, says watching Love Island hasn't made him feel good about how he looks.
    "It's as if the contestants went to the audition and they spoke about themselves and producers went 'Right, what do you look like underneath your clothes?'
    "I'm sure thousands of people applied and auditioned for the show but my feeling is because they didn't have that certain body type or that certain look they didn't get through, which is a bit sad really."
    And while he accepts it's a reality TV show there for entertainment he says the lack of diversity "doesn't feel right in the 21st century".
    "I've spoken to friends about it and how we've all felt inadequate after watching and one jokingly said there should be a 'Chub Island' for us normies.
    "As funny as it was, after a while once you think about it, that shouldn't be the case."

    There has been some defence of Love Island's lack of representation.
    Some fans have pointed out that it's a constructed reality TV show based on "superficial beauty" and suggest it's not its job to reflect society.

    Psychologist Emma Kenny says Love Island isn't necessarily set up to represent a diverse society.
    "That's not to say that it shouldn't be diverse, it's a very shallow programme.
    "While it's got to have depth regarding some of the relationships, for the most part it's about the body beautiful."
    Emma says while there's been criticism of Love Island producers for the lack of diversity, there's the argument that the show is giving its viewers what they want.
    And she says that gives her "a far deeper concern".
    "It suggests that our communities are not accepting potentially of the diversity that our country offers."
    A spokesperson for Love Island told Newsbeat: "When casting for Love Island, we always strive to reflect the age, experiences and diversity of our audience and this year is no exception with a cross section of different personalities and backgrounds in the villa."





    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-44686074[/QUOTE]

    there not one person who disabled on Love Island 1/5 British people have a disability.
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    (Original post by Wōden)
    Who on Earth actually wants to see themselves 'represented' on something like Love Island? I'm frankly embarassed that most of them on there are white. If you're sitting there thinking, "hey, why aren't there more members of my ethnicity on this totally mindless and degraded trash TV show?", you probably need to re-evaluate your collective priorities.

    Just so you are all aware, I will bebanning Love Island and any other shows of a similar ilk when I seize power and declare myself Lord Protector for life in the near future.
    I’m okay with this.
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    (Original post by looloo2134)
    there not one person who disabled on Love Island 1/5 British people have a disability.
    Umm okay?
    Also, what exactly are you defining as a ‘disability’ here?
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    It's about ideals, aspirations and money.

    Some folks want to sell their looks, some prefer to sell their brains. There's obviously a market for it, given how popular the show is.
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    The left strike again.

    I actually hate this century we're growing up in and I'm not even joking when I'm saying I want to leave.
    Everyone always finds something to complain about that life is not even fun anymore because there's always some **** who gets offended ("triggered") by everything.

    "How can you have no south Asian women on the show?" she says.
    Never even watched the show, but the idea of different cultures or people of different race coming together would make it more interesting and Love Island viewers would actually learn something.

    The debate around race and diversity in Love Island has very much focused on contestant Samira - who walked out of the show on Thursday.
    Again, I don't watch the show but, from a quick google search Samira is the only person who looks like she is intelligent enough to keep a mature conversation. Of course men would not be attracted to that as Love Island preys on sub 100 IQ contestants and clearly the more idiotic/famous you are: the better your odds are on doing well in the show (This is not always the case).

    2018 has been the year where body diversity has had more focus - with some brands scrapping airbrushing and promoting bodies of all shapes and sizes.
    But perhaps Love Island producers didn't get the message.
    Pretty much all of the men on this year's show have six-packs while the girls have toned, slim bodies.
    Some fans have questioned why there are no dad-bods or curves in the villa and raised concerns about the way it might make some viewers feel about their image.


    Now I'm going to be very careful with what I say here and avoid offending anyone: If you somehow find what I say offensive, Add me to your Ignore list and **** off.
    Body diversity is present in society. Not everyone has six-packs, not everyone have slim, toned bodies etc.
    I'm all for body diversity to a reasonable limit.
    I'm not fat shaming, but if the show was to add people who would be classed as large/obese, what message would that send to the viewers?
    "That you have an unhealthy lifestyle but we'll still accept you on the show and if all goes well,you'll probably be given a lot more money to maintain that lifestyle if the public likes you"
    I'm not promoting they're decision of having six-pack only contestants and thin-body women as they're are many beautiful healthy women and handsome men who don't fit either of those categories but are living a healthy lifestyle. The issue I have is knowing the world we live in, they're going to protest into having contestants who should probably be admitted to a hospital.






    Tldr: There may be a slight tiny issue with diversity in race and possibly age (I don't watch the show), but with the body image they can make small changes provided they don't promote unhealthy lifestyles.
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    It's not exactly like Loveisland is at the forefront of the progressive movement.

    It's really just a microcosm of society's outlook on attractiveness and the dating scene. It's moving in the right direction, but it's a slow process to change deep ingrained beauty standards and angry tweets create more division than it does help the situation.
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    No hope left for humanity.

    Crying over a dating show for not speaking on current issues.

    *facepalm*
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    It has a problem with being **** television.
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    i can't watch the show because of their freakishly white teeth tbh. but imho - it's a freaking reality show. i don't look to Love Island as my moral compass or a lesson on diversity or equality or political correctness. i'm guessing viewers don't watch Love Island to become a better person. i agree with other members that you can't have too much diversity on a show like this, because then it becomes too political. people get lumped into groups or labelled for what makes them different (the fat one, the old one, the tattooed one) and then it becomes a matter of what kind of person would you date. if only 2 people would date 'the fat one', the fat one is at a disadvantage and the game isn't fair. i'm not saying i like it, but for fairness sake everyone has to pretty much be the same person.
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    I get the racial point - and I don't see any reason why you wouldn't want to have more diversity. I would probably get a good bit of PR for the company, and wouldn't put anyone off watching.

    The age/disabled/fat stuff is just stupid though.
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    As a aside, her South Asian comment made me think a bit. I feel like diversity sometimes just means more black people. I hardly ever see S.Asians on telly. The national football team which is supposed to represent Britain hardly has any Asians. Even though they are more numerous in the UK than Africans and Carribeans.
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    (Original post by Wōden)
    Who on Earth actually wants to see themselves 'represented' on something like Love Island? I'm frankly embarassed that most of them on there are white. If you're sitting there thinking, "hey, why aren't there more members of my ethnicity on this totally mindless and degraded trash TV show?", you probably need to re-evaluate your collective priorities.

    .
    Couldn't agree more.
    Is Jeremy Kyle, the king of white Trash, a racist show?
    On that show Black faces are like rocking horse **** and South Asians totally unheard of.
    Are they deliberately kept off or have they got too much dignity to go on?
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    It isnt meant to be a reflection of society. They pick from who is available and there is a big emphasis on the physical hence the age and the typical competitors of students, PTs and relatively low level jobs.

    The contestants can make money, the TV company make money and plenty of people still watch it. Think people like to complain and make too much of it.

    Maybe one full of 40 year olds wouldnt quite capture the audience as they might be grown up.
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    In terms of race, yes of course.

    On the show, there have been countless amounts of black guys but no sign of people from other races. There has been only 1 black girl so far in this series!!!!!! In fact, I think she is the first black girl to appear on the show altogether lol...

    The show definitely has a race problem. Apparently, Samira (the black girl), won the hideaway with Frankie but that wasn't broadcasted. Megan won the hideaway twice and that was broadcasted both times? Most parts of Frankie's and Samira's segments on the show weren't broadcasted and I believe the producers had a hidden agenda.

    Again, there was racial tension between Georgia and Samira but that wasn't broadcasted, probably to protect Georgia but it all came out in the end anyway...

    Most people would say that Samira should have tried to get with who was her own race BUT how could she if none of the black guys was really into her and showed more interest to other girls.

    (Original post by fallen_acorns)
    I get the racial point - and I don't see any reason why you wouldn't want to have more diversity. I would probably get a good bit of PR for the company, and wouldn't put anyone off watching.

    The age/disabled/fat stuff is just stupid though.
    I completely agree with this!
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    The ethnic minorities are significantly over represented; 8 of the 38 people on the show this year are not white and that’s still including certain mixed race people and people of questionable ethnic background as white, in reality the number is likely higher.

    As for age; how many people on their forties would want to go on there? Further, the show is most popular amongst people in their teens and twenties who typically find people of that age range attractive hence the casting.

    As for body shapes; sorry that they don’t cast fat people, most people don’t find that attractive.
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    Sorry but the truth is nobody wants to watch fat ugly people squabble.

    If they want to see that they can go and stand in the queue at Walmart's.
 
 
 
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