People who can speak French fluently should not take A level French

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username3944114
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#1
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#1
Or any language for that matter. It's extremely unfair for someone who actually wants to learn and acquire the language to compete against someone who can basically already speak it. It seems grade boundaries are constantly raised by people who lived in France for 8 years/have a parent who is fluent in French and only take the subject for the A*. I imagine it's probably the same difficulty as an English speaker taking English Language GCSE if not easier.
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madmirrors
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#2
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(Original post by jpink2001)
Or any language for that matter. It's extremely unfair for someone who actually wants to learn and acquire the language to compete against someone who can basically already speak it. It seems grade boundaries are constantly raised by people who lived in France for 8 years/have a parent who is fluent in French and only take the subject for the A*. I imagine it's probably the same difficulty as an English speaker taking English Language GCSE if not easier.
I agree with you! If you're a native speaker or already fluent then there's no point in taking your own language at A level because you won't learn anything new or achieve anything. I'm English but got a C in A level German and an A in GCSE German. A level German was difficult.
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HHJ11
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#3
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#3
While I agree, think of it from their perspective.

They'll get an easy A Level at presumably an A/A*, so why wouldn't they?

That grade will probably help them secure a good university offer, so I know if I could speak a foreign language fluently and had the opportunity to do it as an A Level, I would, because it's easy marks, despite it not being fair for everyone else.
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Dysf(x)al
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#4
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#4
(Original post by jpink2001)
Or any language for that matter. It's extremely unfair for someone who actually wants to learn and acquire the language to compete against someone who can basically already speak it. It seems grade boundaries are constantly raised by people who lived in France for 8 years/have a parent who is fluent in French and only take the subject for the A*. I imagine it's probably the same difficulty as an English speaker taking English Language GCSE if not easier.
And this is precisely why language A-level boundaries have been lowered to allow more high grades.
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vywivdlewefehd
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#5
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#5
I don't agree, if someone's parents were both maths teachers who taught them in advance for the maths course they were taking, that wouldn't be unfair, of course they would use that to their advantage. Maybe the people taking French do have a genuine interest in the subject, even though they already speak it and there's always room for them to learn more about the culture or even improve their abilities. I would think that the people in the class who have the same interest in learning would use that to their advantage by using the fluent speakers as another learning resource instead of complaining about it.
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Plantagenet Crown
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#6
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#6
You sound salty. Someone being a native speaker doesn’t stop you from learning and it’s not going to make a real difference to grade boundaries.
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Plantagenet Crown
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#7
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(Original post by madmirrors)
I agree with you! If you're a native speaker or already fluent then there's no point in taking your own language at A level because you won't learn anything new or achieve anything. I'm English but got a C in A level German and an A in GCSE German. A level German was difficult.
But A level isn’t just grammar and words, it’s film, books, culture etc. so yes, a native speaker could learn things.
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Loci Pi
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(Original post by jpink2001)
Or any language for that matter. It's extremely unfair for someone who actually wants to learn and acquire the language to compete against someone who can basically already speak it. It seems grade boundaries are constantly raised by people who lived in France for 8 years/have a parent who is fluent in French and only take the subject for the A*. I imagine it's probably the same difficulty as an English speaker taking English Language GCSE if not easier.
In my GCSE French class there was somebody who could speak French fluently because they used to live there. Our teacher used to compare the rest of the class to them even though it's not like we would speak it as good as them. They did seem embarrassed when our teacher did that though
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bulgylau
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#9
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#9
A lot of universities disregard a person having an extra a level in their own native language anyway

(Original post by Haider_A)
While I agree, think of it from their perspective.

They'll get an easy A Level at presumably an A/A*, so why wouldn't they?

That grade will probably help them secure a good university offer, so I know if I could speak a foreign language fluently and had the opportunity to do it as an A Level, I would, because it's easy marks, despite it not being fair for everyone else.
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Elizabeth II
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#10
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(Original post by jpink2001)
Or any language for that matter. It's extremely unfair for someone who actually wants to learn and acquire the language to compete against someone who can basically already speak it. It seems grade boundaries are constantly raised by people who lived in France for 8 years/have a parent who is fluent in French and only take the subject for the A*. I imagine it's probably the same difficulty as an English speaker taking English Language GCSE if not easier.
Hello,

I completely disagree with you - and I study French at degree level in Paris. Native speakers should be allowed to capitalise on it if they want to do so - you can still learn things as a native from studying your own language, for example, complicated grammar etc. (i.e. structures which you may use, but do not know the theory behind). As Planta says above, it's going to make no difference to you anyway - so why do you care?

It's not remotely 'extremely unfair'. By this logic, you should immediately stop studying English because you can already speak it and it's unfair to other people that aren't English that want to study it. Which of course, is total nonsense. If they want the A* then why not? They're simply utilising their skills. If somebody was a Maths prodigy from a young age and had incredible skills in the subject, they would obviously take Maths A-level and there'd be no problem with that, despite the two situations being relatively comparable.
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e-Basic
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#11
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(Original post by jpink2001)
Or any language for that matter. It's extremely unfair for someone who actually wants to learn and acquire the language to compete against someone who can basically already speak it. It seems grade boundaries are constantly raised by people who lived in France for 8 years/have a parent who is fluent in French and only take the subject for the A*. I imagine it's probably the same difficulty as an English speaker taking English Language GCSE if not easier.
I don't think so. Just because you speak the language doesn't mean you're going to be getting the best grade. Yes its easier for them however studying a language for A level isn't just about speaking the language. You have to be able to write fluently, infer information from texts, and much more, Also, you could learn more with someone who speaks a language fluently as you can improve your pronunciation and work together after school. Finally, what about if that native speaker wants to study their language at university, they shouldn't be at a disadvantage because they speak the language.
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username3944114
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Paracosm)
Hello,

I completely disagree with you - and I study French at degree level in Paris. Native speakers should be allowed to capitalise on it if they want to do so - you can still learn things as a native from studying your own language, for example, complicated grammar etc. (ones which you may use, but do not know the theory behind). As Planta says above, it's going to make no difference to you anyway - so why do you care?

It's not remotely 'extremely unfair'. By this logic, you should immediately stop studying English because you can already speak it and it's unfair to other people that aren't English that want to study it. Which of course, is total nonsense. If they want the A* then why not? They're simply utilising their skills. If somebody was a Maths prodigy from a young age and had incredible skills in the subject, they would obviously take Maths A-level and there'd be no problem with that, despite the two situations being relatively comparable.
You can't compare French A level to English A level. French is very much revolved around learning the language (granted, much of this is difficult if you are not a native speaker) and much less around analysing techniques/themes etc. which English is mostly.
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tom123h456
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#13
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#13
I disagree with you
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the bear
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#14
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#14
people who are naturally gifted in maths should be banned from A level maths because it is unfair on the others.
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Elizabeth II
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#15
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#15
(Original post by jpink2001)
You can't compare French A level to English A level. French is very much revolved around learning the language (granted, much of this is difficult if you are not a native speaker) and much less around analysing techniques/themes etc. which English is mostly.
French A-level actually combines both of these things. Language more so, yes, but to say that it's "revolved" around language is inaccurate. What I'm saying is that you sound jealous and bitter and should instead focus on getting your grades rather than being envious of your French-speaking peers. They're studying their language in English - which is a feat in itself. Either way, it simply doesn't matter.
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eggyeol
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#16
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#16
I had two natives in my A-level French class and three in my Spanish. They were a lot better than us (of course) and they didn't have to spend as much time learning vocabulary and grammar as they already knew it meaning they could spend more time on the cultural side of things. I don't really see how it's fair nor can I understand why people are making a comparison to a native English speaker doing an A-level in English? In A-level English you're analysing how language is used and how it's changed over time - you're not learning how to read/write/speak it.
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Elizabeth II
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#17
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(Original post by the bear)
people who are naturally gifted in maths should be banned from A level maths because it is unfair the others.
Quite right too, bear™!
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username3944114
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#18
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#18
(Original post by the bear)
people who are naturally gifted in maths should be banned from A level maths because it is unfair the others.
What a ridiculous comparison. There is no such thing as being 'naturally gifted' in a language, you are just lucky to have grown up in a foreign country/have a fluent parent. If you are naturally gifted in a certain subject, good for you. The difference with A level French is that regular students are at a huge disadvantage against fluent speakers - they have had so much more experience in the subject, and I'm pretty sure the point of A level MFL is to learn a language in detail rather than just regurgitate something that you've been comfortable with since you were a child.
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3pointonefour
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#19
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#19
(Original post by jpink2001)
What a ridiculous comparison. There is no such thing as being 'naturally gifted' in a language, you are just lucky to have grown up in a foreign country/have a fluent parent. If you are naturally gifted in a certain subject, good for you. The difference with A level French is that regular students are at a huge disadvantage against fluent speakers - they have had so much more experience in the subject, and I'm pretty sure the point of A level MFL is to learn a language in detail rather than just regurgitate something that you've been comfortable with since you were a child.
So should I not take A-level maths because I already taught myself it, and I'll be at a huge advantage to everyone else, so I'll just take it for the easy A*?
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username3944114
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Paracosm)
French A-level actually combines both of these things. Language more so, yes, but to say that it's "revolved" around language is inaccurate. What I'm saying is that you sound jealous and bitter and should instead focus on getting your grades rather than being envious of your French-speaking peers. They're studying their language in English - which is a feat in itself. Either way, it simply doesn't matter.
I'm sure that any analysis of the French language in A level is similar to GCSE level. And I'm not sure why you're randomly calling me bitter and jealous.
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