Got offers for MSc or BSc MH nursing. What advantage does MSc give me? Watch

SC1643
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I'm kind of stuck at the moment. I have an offer for BSc mental health nursing degree at a uni I really like and an offer for MSc MH nursing at a uni that seems okay but has been very disorganised so far so I've lost some faith in them. The courses are both three years.

All my applications were for BSc but one uni said I'm eligible for MSc so bumped it up (I already have a degree).

Can anyone tell me what advantage an MSc gives me? I don't know if I'd be stupid to choose a lower qualification but at this moment in time I have no idea what difference having an MSc has.
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Mum_C
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Hi, I was in a similar situation. I also have a degree in a completely different subject and have applied for Nursing as a mature student. I applied for BSc Child Nursing at a couple of universities and was accepted into the courses at both. At one of my choices, I was also offered MNurs in Adult and Child. The benefit of the Masters would be potentially a fast-tracked career as well as more opportunities to study in two different areas of Nursing (if your MSc is Dual Field).
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Kayla1709
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(Original post by Mum_C)
Hi, I was in a similar situation. I also have a degree in a completely different subject and have applied for Nursing as a mature student. I applied for BSc Child Nursing at a couple of universities and was accepted into the courses at both. At one of my choices, I was also offered MNurs in Adult and Child. The benefit of the Masters would be potentially a fast-tracked career as well as more opportunities to study in two different areas of Nursing (if your MSc is Dual Field).
Sorry if you don’t mind me asking where was the Mnurs in adult and child nursing ? ( as in which university )
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Mum_C
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(Original post by Kayla1709)
Sorry if you don’t mind me asking where was the Mnurs in adult and child nursing ? ( as in which university )
Southampton University
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Kayla1709
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(Original post by Mum_C)
Southampton University
Thank you !
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Rh32
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As far as I'm aware aren't masters the same but more condensed so only take 2 years? That may be wrong. Have you looked at the modules for each course to see similarities or if the masters goes into more depth?
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Mum_C
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I can't answer for MSc in single field Nursing in comparison to BSc in single field (and them both taking 3 years as an undergrad) but in my situation, the dual field course used to be a BSc but in the past couple of years they have integrated a Master's into the course making it a 4 year degree with a completed level 7 qualification at the end (as opposed to a level 6 which is a Bachelors)
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SC1643
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(Original post by Bec260205)
As far as I'm aware aren't masters the same but more condensed so only take 2 years? That may be wrong. Have you looked at the modules for each course to see similarities or if the masters goes into more depth?
There are some that are 2 years but the ones near me require some health care experience which I don't have so I'm only eligible for the three year one
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moonkatt
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With an MSc you get to study at a higher level and have a masters at the end. You’ll still be an NQ nurse, just like those with a BSc. I’m yet to be convinced that those who have a masters have a “fast tracked” career, clinically relevant post reg courses and experience are what usually lead to progression.
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Mum_C
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(Original post by moonkatt)
With an MSc you get to study at a higher level and have a masters at the end. You’ll still be an NQ nurse, just like those with a BSc. I’m yet to be convinced that those who have a masters have a “fast tracked” career, clinically relevant post reg courses and experience are what usually lead to progression.
I do wonder how much of a difference it actually makes in one's ability to fast track. I think it would only make an individual more likely to be selected for a promotion if they were competing against similarly experienced candidates. Also, it saves doing a MSc at a later date (which would, at some point, be a requirement to be eligible to promote to the higher bands).
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moonkatt
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(Original post by Mum_C)
I do wonder how much of a difference it actually makes in one's ability to fast track. I think it would only make an individual more likely to be selected for a promotion if they were competing against similarly experienced candidates. Also, it saves doing a MSc at a later date (which would, at some point, be a requirement to be eligible to promote to the higher bands)
Quite a lot of these higher bands you speak of require specific courses at masters level though, such as ANP requiring the advanced practice masters or advancement in other specific clinical areas requiring post reg study (for example in my own speciality, critical care requiring a university accredited critical care course for advancement to b6). Having prior experience of study at level 7 would be advantageous as there’s a proven track record of study at this level hopefully meaning these individuals would find further study at this level not as challenging compared to people new to it, but a generic pre reg course will not explore the same topics at this level that specialised courses would.
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Mum_C
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(Original post by moonkatt)
Quite a lot of these higher bands you speak of require specific courses at masters level though, such as ANP requiring the advanced practice masters or advancement in other specific clinical areas requiring post reg study (for example in my own speciality, critical care requiring a university accredited critical care course for advancement to b6). Having prior experience of study at level 7 would be advantageous as there’s a proven track record of study at this level hopefully meaning these individuals would find further study at this level not as challenging compared to people new to it, but a generic pre reg course will not explore the same topics at this level that specialised courses would.
This is something that has been on my mind. I (currently) wish to specialise in Neonatal care after completing whichever degree I complete (be it the MNurs or the BSc). I know that they state the completion of MSc Critical Care ANNP course to pursue a long career in this area but wondered if, having completed the MNurs, it would still be a requirement... I think you have answered my question.
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moonkatt
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(Original post by Mum_C)
This is something that has been on my mind. I (currently) wish to specialise in Neonatal care after completing whichever degree I complete (be it the MNurs or the BSc). I know that they state the completion of MSc Critical Care ANNP course to pursue a long career in this area but wondered if, having completed the MNurs, it would still be a requirement... I think you have answered my question.
Yeah, you would still need to complete the ANNP course. There’s nothing wrong with doing the pre reg masters if you want to, but it is a generic preregistration course covering content the NMC wants every registered nurse to have covered, all be it at a higher academic level.
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SC1643
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(Original post by moonkatt)
Yeah, you would still need to complete the ANNP course. There’s nothing wrong with doing the pre reg masters if you want to, but it is a generic preregistration course covering content the NMC wants every registered nurse to have covered, all be it at a higher academic level.
Thanks for your helpful replies. You've confirmed what I was thinking really. I don't want to pick a uni I don't really like and make an already hard course more difficult if it makes little difference. I already have a masters in something completely unrelated so getting the MSc for the sake of having an MSc is irrelevant to me.
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moonkatt
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(Original post by SC1643)
Thanks for your helpful replies. You've confirmed what I was thinking really. I don't want to pick a uni I don't really like and make an already hard course more difficult if it makes little difference. I already have a masters in something completely unrelated so getting the MSc for the sake of having an MSc is irrelevant to me.
Aside from academic stuff when choosing a nursing course, it really helps to be somewhere that you like. You’re going to be there a lot more than more traditional students with their long vacation periods. It makes sense to choose somewhere you’ll be happy living and working in, as the nursing course is more like working tbh. A lot of nursing students tend to secure their first jobs in the place they studied too.
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SC1643
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(Original post by moonkatt)
Aside from academic stuff when choosing a nursing course, it really helps to be somewhere that you like. You’re going to be there a lot more than more traditional students with their long vacation periods. It makes sense to choose somewhere you’ll be happy living and working in, as the nursing course is more like working tbh. A lot of nursing students tend to secure their first jobs in the place they studied too.
Can you tell me, if I wanted to study a specialised masters in the future would I be expected to self-fund or do employers tend to fund these things? I'm guessing it depends on if it's relevant for your role? I know nurses who have had their prescribing qualification funded but that's all.
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moonkatt
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(Original post by SC1643)
Can you tell me, if I wanted to study a specialised masters in the future would I be expected to self-fund or do employers tend to fund these things? I'm guessing it depends on if it's relevant for your role? I know nurses who have had their prescribing qualification funded but that's all.
If it’s something relevant to your role it’s more likely to be funded.
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Sflan
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Hi I hope you don't mind me asking, but did you take the MNurs Adult and Child at Southampton? If so how many university hours and how many homework hours did you do in year 1?Many thanks
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