The Student Room Group

BSc or MSc Mental Health Nursing?

I graduated with a degree in Sport and Management 10 years ago that i have never had any use for.

I now have unconditional offers for BSc Mental Health Nursing from two uni's.
I discovered that one of them also offers MSc MH Nursing for those who already have an undergrad degree. Doesn't even have to be a related field.

Both the BSc and MSc are 3 year courses and grant me registration on the NMC once i pass.

Practically, which course is likely to be more beneficial career wise?
I know MSc means i have a masters, but does that actually make a difference in a nursing career?

I'd like to do the masters, but if the only tangible difference is the letters on the degree, then i may go for the BSc which ought to be easier.
Original post by Sutton90
I graduated with a degree in Sport and Management 10 years ago that i have never had any use for.

I now have unconditional offers for BSc Mental Health Nursing from two uni's.
I discovered that one of them also offers MSc MH Nursing for those who already have an undergrad degree. Doesn't even have to be a related field.

Both the BSc and MSc are 3 year courses and grant me registration on the NMC once i pass.

Practically, which course is likely to be more beneficial career wise?
I know MSc means i have a masters, but does that actually make a difference in a nursing career?

I'd like to do the masters, but if the only tangible difference is the letters on the degree, then i may go for the BSc which ought to be easier.


Are you sure the MSc is 3 years? Pre-reg MSc nursing degrees are usually 2 years, which is the only advantage of doing this over the BSc/BN.
Otherwise...
- on qualifying, you start at the bottom of band 5 regardless of which one you did
- progression prospects are pretty much the same
- once you have your registration, that and post registration competence, experience and study is the important bit.
Reply 2
@Emily_B
The MSc midwife course here Emily is three years as same as the bsc course but the masters degree for adult nursing is only two years with those with a previous degree.

Original post by Emily_B
Are you sure the MSc is 3 years? Pre-reg MSc nursing degrees are usually 2 years, which is the only advantage of doing this over the BSc/BN.
Otherwise...
- on qualifying, you start at the bottom of band 5 regardless of which one you did
- progression prospects are pretty much the same
- once you have your registration, that and post registration competence, experience and study is the important bit.
Reply 3
Original post by Tracey_W
@Emily_B
The MSc midwife course here Emily is three years as same as the bsc course but the masters degree for adult nursing is only two years with those with a previous degree.


Hi, @Tracey_W!

Sorry to ask you, but do you study at the University of Huddersfield?
Reply 4
Original post by Meheraj
Hi, @Tracey_W!

Sorry to ask you, but do you study at the University of Huddersfield?


Sorry I didn't study at Huddersfield university as I actually studied at one of only 3 universities in my own country of the UK that offered midwifery πŸ˜€
Reply 5
Original post by Tracey_W
Sorry I didn't study at Huddersfield university as I actually studied at one of only 3 universities in my own country of the UK that offered midwifery πŸ˜€

Oh, my bad! Actually, I had a friend there whose name is Chioma Tracey and her last name starts with 'W' similar to your username. I lost contact and we're not been in touch with each other for some time. That's why I asked you whether you're she or not.
Reply 6
Original post by Meheraj
Oh, my bad! Actually, I had a friend there whose name is Chioma Tracey and her last name starts with 'W' similar to your username. I lost contact and we're not been in touch with each other for some time. That's why I asked you whether you're she or not.


Sorry I am not your friend but hopefully you'll eventually get in touch with one another.
Reply 7
Original post by Tracey_W
Sorry I am not your friend but hopefully you'll eventually get in touch with one another.

It's okay. Yeah, I might.

But I apologise again for the disturbance I've caused.
Reply 8
Original post by Meheraj
It's okay. Yeah, I might.

But I apologise again for the disturbance I've caused.


It's fine as I would probably have done the same thing as yourself if I lost contact with someone.
You have not caused any disturbance okay.πŸ˜€
Reply 9
Original post by Tracey_W
It's fine as I would probably have done the same thing as yourself if I lost contact with someone.
You have not caused any disturbance okay.πŸ˜€

That's so sweet of you! :smile: Thanks!
Reply 10
Original post by Meheraj
That's so sweet of you! :smile: Thanks!


You are welcome πŸ€—πŸ€—
Original post by Emily_B
Are you sure the MSc is 3 years? Pre-reg MSc nursing degrees are usually 2 years, which is the only advantage of doing this over the BSc/BN.
Otherwise...
- on qualifying, you start at the bottom of band 5 regardless of which one you did
- progression prospects are pretty much the same
- once you have your registration, that and post registration competence, experience and study is the important bit.

Having a Masters in Nursing will give you wider promotional opportunities in nursing the future many graduate entry programmes for MSc Nursing are 2 years
Original post by lorrainemt
Having a Masters in Nursing will give you wider promotional opportunities in nursing the future many graduate entry programmes for MSc Nursing are 2 years

I'm fully aware that post pre-reg MSc nursing courses are 2 years - I assess many of them in practice (with a mere BSc to my name).
In practice, having a pre-registration masters doesn't make any difference to gaining promotion - it's the post-registrstion ones that do.

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