what a levels should i pick and what uni degree should i do Watch

MKay101
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I am currently a yr 11 student and want to do A levels. What A levels should i pick if i want to go into something got to do with IT, i am thinking of IT and Business but i am stuck on what the third a level should be. I am thinking of maths but will it be too difficult if i do all A levels. As i have heard IT is fairly difficult. Would there be any other A level that i should consider picking?
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Prix0
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(Original post by MKay101)
I am currently a yr 11 student and want to do A levels. What A levels should i pick if i want to go into something got to do with IT, i am thinking of IT and Business but i am stuck on what the third a level should be. I am thinking of maths but will it be too difficult if i do all A levels. As i have heard IT is fairly difficult. Would there be any other A level that i should consider picking?
IT and Business are stupid A-Levels to pick. IT is a dying field, you should look into Data Science / Computer Science instead.

Recommended A-Levels:
- Maths,
- Further Maths
- Physics
- Computing
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MKay101
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Prix0
Thanks for the feedback. I dont think that IT and Business are stupid A Levels to pick and it is not a dying field as everything is becoming more IT based and the world is into technology now than ever so more business are being made so this means more demand in these fields.I have thought about computer science and had feedback from A Level and Uni students that if you have no beginner knowledge it is harder to learn as it builds up on the basics, my secondary school doesnt allow you to do IT as a GCSE but allows you to do IMedia which is a vocational this i heard is a completely different thing to IT GCSE. Would you think that if i do IT and Business will it be good to do maths as i dont want the work load to be too much. If i do maths should i do BTEC Business as an A Level to make it easier for myself. Also if i do these what uni degree shall i do?

Thanks MKay101
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by MKay101)
Prix0
Thanks for the feedback. I dont think that IT and Business are stupid A Levels to pick and it is not a dying field as everything is becoming more IT based and the world is into technology now than ever so more business are being made so this means more demand in these fields.I have thought about computer science and had feedback from A Level and Uni students that if you have no beginner knowledge it is harder to learn as it builds up on the basics, my secondary school doesnt allow you to do IT as a GCSE but allows you to do IMedia which is a vocational this i heard is a completely different thing to IT GCSE. Would you think that if i do IT and Business will it be good to do maths as i dont want the work load to be too much. If i do maths should i do BTEC Business as an A Level to make it easier for myself. Also if i do these what uni degree shall i do?

Thanks MKay101
You'll be doing yourself a favour by not doing IT A-level, it is truly useless. I agree with what the other commenter said, do computer science instead. It's definetly possible to learn it without having done it at GCSE, just read over the stuff a bit over summer and you'll be fine. Business is also not a recommended A-level as many of the more respectable uni's don't count it as an A-level (Imperial College London comes to mind as one of them), so I wouldn't pick that either, maybe take economics instead. If you want to pursue computer science, you'll definitely need maths A-level as well, so I think your best option would be: Maths, Computer Science and Economics, maybe business instead of economics if you're reaaaaallly set on doing business.
If you have any questions about those subjects, or maths or computer science I can help as im currently taking both maths and computer science at A-level
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Prix0
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(Original post by MKay101)
Prix0
Thanks for the feedback. I dont think that IT and Business are stupid A Levels to pick and it is not a dying field as everything is becoming more IT based and the world is into technology now than ever so more business are being made so this means more demand in these fields.I have thought about computer science and had feedback from A Level and Uni students that if you have no beginner knowledge it is harder to learn as it builds up on the basics, my secondary school doesnt allow you to do IT as a GCSE but allows you to do IMedia which is a vocational this i heard is a completely different thing to IT GCSE. Would you think that if i do IT and Business will it be good to do maths as i dont want the work load to be too much. If i do maths should i do BTEC Business as an A Level to make it easier for myself. Also if i do these what uni degree shall i do?

Thanks MKay101
Sorry bro but you have got it all wrong.

I agree that the world is becoming affected by technology more and more, and that is why Data Scientists and Coders are so much in demand.

You have to understand the difference between IT, Comp Sci and Data Science before making an argument.

You will not be able to understand the field of machine learning & AI with an IT degree teaching you how to fix a computer. You should instead study something like Data Science which gives you the full package.
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.unknown
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(Original post by Prix0)
Sorry bro but you have got it all wrong.

I agree that the world is becoming affected by technology more and more, and that is why Data Scientists and Coders are so much in demand.

You have to understand the difference between IT, Comp Sci and Data Science before making an argument.

You will not be able to understand the field of machine learning & AI with an IT degree teaching you how to fix a computer. You should instead study something like Data Science which gives you the full package.
What's the difference between data science and computer science and which one is more useful?
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Prix0
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(Original post by .unknown)
What's the difference between data science and computer science and which one is more useful?
Google it.
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MKay101
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ZdYnm8vuNR
Thank you for your reply and could i would like to know that what does computer science really involve? also is it hard as you have picked 2 really hard A levels. Also is economics an A level or a b tech because i want a third subject to enjoy and be easy so i dont have to worry about it and is it harder than business?

sorry for late reply.
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MKay101
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(Original post by Prix0)
Google it.
Prix0 if you know so much about it you might aswel tell us and explain what computer science contains and what they teach and also what the difference is and also tell us what data science is because when we research this kind of stuff up it doesn't give us a clear understanding on what the difference is. You might aswell help us.
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Bogelles
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Don't do IT at A level, these others are right in saying its a dying failed and utterly useless. Although I can't speak on the business/economics side of things as I have never done it if they are saying the some of the top uni's don't count business as an A level (like most uni's with stuff like critical thinking or whatever its called) then you would be making a mistake by taking it.

You are also massively overestimating how hard A levels are and how much work you have, 3 A levels even if you took maths, further maths and physics allow you to have a manageable workload. The problem of workload and it being hard arises most of the time when people take 4 hard A levels like maths, further maths, physics and chemistry for example.

Computer science is not a hard A level, some prior knowledge is useful though but not necessarily needed but it will make starting it a little easier. It doesn't require too much work either. Maths isn't that hard, if you're **** at maths then yeah it will be but the work isn't much and its perfectly possible.

You are basically currently considering 2 useless and easy A levels (IT just has lots of work but it isn't hard) and wanting to take an even easier 3rd one for fun and quite frankly if you are worried about the workload and difficulty of them then I don't think A levels are for you.

I would recommend:
- Maths - an incredibly useful A level to have
- Computer Science - much more relevant and beneficial for you than IT, I have never seen any uni course ask for IT but loads for computer science and it will allow you to go into more areas
- Economics - apparently like business but better
- Any 4th one you want, if you can pick one you will enjoy and might be relevant then great but doesn't need to be, it does give you leeway to drop a subject though if needed which is why it will be better if it's slightly more relevant to what you want to do. I cannot recommend taking four enough even if you don't finish with four as you dropped one

A levels aren't meant to be easy but they also aren't impossible either



Can I ask what grades you are currently working at and projected to get in your GCSEs?
Last edited by Bogelles; 2 weeks ago
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holly6901
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you can always consider 2 A Levels and an epq. I take that and the workload is much more manageable
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kkboyk
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(Original post by Prix0)
IT and Business are stupid A-Levels to pick. IT is a dying field, you should look into Data Science / Computer Science instead.

Recommended A-Levels:
- Maths,
- Further Maths
- Physics
- Computing
IT is the fastest growing field, and will continue to expand because of digitalisation (same with IT related roles in other industry). Digital technologies have risen to prominence as a critical determinant of economic growth, national security, and international competitiveness, so there is massive funding going into them and far more job opportunities due to its importance. IT industry is also known to have the best employee benefits and better working conditions. I think the mistake you did here is linking the industry with educational courses.

Anywho OP, what you should do is asking yourself what you want to do after A-levels, and identifying jobs in the IT industry that interests you (e.g. Business Analysis, Product or Project Management, Consultancy, Software Testing, Developer, Software or Electronic Engineer). Science A-levels are usually preferable if you're planning on going to further studies.

A lot of people working in IT don't have science A-levels or a STEM degree. Depending on the role you want to land, you could take the faster route through apprenticeships.
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Prix0
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(Original post by kkboyk)
IT is the fastest growing field, and will continue to expand because of digitalisation (same with IT related roles in other industry). Digital technologies have risen to prominence as a critical determinant of economic growth, national security, and international competitiveness, so there is massive funding going into them and far more job opportunities due to its importance. IT industry is also known to have the best employee benefits and better working conditions. I think the mistake you did here is linking the industry with educational courses.

Anywho OP, what you should do is asking yourself what you want to do after A-levels, and identifying jobs in the IT industry that interests you (e.g. Business Analysis, Product or Project Management, Consultancy, Software Testing, Developer, Software or Electronic Engineer). Science A-levels are usually preferable if you're planning on going to further studies.

A lot of people working in IT don't have science A-levels or a STEM degree. Depending on the role you want to land, you could take the faster route through apprenticeships.
Another person who clearly doesn't understand the difference between being a technician and a data scientist within Technology.

Technology is the fastest growing field not IT. IT is dying. Do your research.
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Prix0
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(Original post by MKay101)
Prix0 if you know so much about it you might aswel tell us and explain what computer science contains and what they teach and also what the difference is and also tell us what data science is because when we research this kind of stuff up it doesn't give us a clear understanding on what the difference is. You might aswell help us.
I don't know much about it but I know the difference.

Data Science essentially involves high level of statistics, mathematics and computer science in order to analyse complex data. A data scientist usually has a Master's degree due to the high level of mathematical aptitude required in this industry. Data Scientist Technologists are the 4th most in demand in the US right now, especially in the financial services industry where there's tons of data to analyse.

IT is basically someone who knows how to fix a computer and repair parts and so on. This is a dying field. Software engineers are more in demand. To become an IT technician you don't need a degree, but to break into software engineering you usually do. I say usually because nowadays there are firms who are willing to train you in this field without a degree (given you have already got some programming skills) such as Google, Apple etc etc.

Computer Science is the study of computers and computational systems including coding. It is a must to have programming abilities (usually in the field of R, Stata, Python, Matlab) to become a data scientist.

Talk to your teachers and have a discussion about the difference between Data Science, Computer Science and IT. I hope you understand which one is the more lucrative area to get into. Don't listen to others who say IT is the fastest growing area because they're simply ignorant. Technology is the fastest growing area and by this I mean Data Scientists.
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Prix0
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F

(Original post by Bogelles)
Don't do IT at A level, these others are right in saying its a dying failed and utterly useless. Although I can't speak on the business/economics side of things as I have never done it if they are saying the some of the top uni's don't count business as an A level (like most uni's with stuff like critical thinking or whatever its called) then you would be making a mistake by taking it.

You are also massively overestimating how hard A levels are and how much work you have, 3 A levels even if you took maths, further maths and physics allow you to have a manageable workload. The problem of workload and it being hard arises most of the time when people take 4 hard A levels like maths, further maths, physics and chemistry for example.

Computer science is not a hard A level, some prior knowledge is useful though but not necessarily needed but it will make starting it a little easier. It doesn't require too much work either. Maths isn't that hard, if you're **** at maths then yeah it will be but the work isn't much and its perfectly possible.

You are basically currently considering 2 useless and easy A levels (IT just has lots of work but it isn't hard) and wanting to take an even easier 3rd one for fun and quite frankly if you are worried about the workload and difficulty of them then I don't think A levels are for you.

I would recommend:
- Maths - an incredibly useful A level to have
- Computer Science - much more relevant and beneficial for you than IT, I have never seen any uni course ask for IT but loads for computer science and it will allow you to go into more areas
- Economics - apparently like business but better
- Any 4th one you want, if you can pick one you will enjoy and might be relevant then great but doesn't need to be, it does give you leeway to drop a subject though if needed which is why it will be better if it's slightly more relevant to what you want to do. I cannot recommend taking four enough even if you don't finish with four as you dropped one

A levels aren't meant to be easy but they also aren't impossible either



Can I ask what grades you are currently working at and projected to get in your GCSEs?
finally someone who understand what im talking about
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winterscoming
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(Original post by Prix0)
Another person who clearly doesn't understand the difference between being a technician and a data scientist within Technology.

Technology is the fastest growing field not IT. IT is dying. Do your research.
You seem to be making a point over an irrelevant hair-splitting distinction in terminology, and don't seem to have actually read most of the other person's post that you've replied to either.

In the context of jobs and careers (rather than the context of A-Level ICT which you seem to be conflating it with), and in common English Language usage, terms like 'Tech', 'Technology' and 'Information Technology' are entirely interchangable. It is not useful or helpful to anybody to try to antagonise those terms or create confusion by trying to make nitpicky differences between them. Those terms all describe the same thing; a very broad spectrum of different possible career paths and disciplines, and not just 'IT support' or helpdesk/technician.
'IT' covers anything requiring expertise in computerised systems, including data science, software engineering, hardware/electronics, Info/cybersecurity, networking/infrastructure, games development, web development, and many more (most of which are a long way removed from studying A-Level ICT).

Otherwise, there's nothing at all from the post you replied to which is wrong in any way all. The person you're replying to clearly does understand what they're talking about, ironically perhaps moreso than you do; although even if they didn't, there's no need to take a condescending tone towards those who know less than you. I'm sure you wouldn't appreciate it if the tables were turned?

In any case, "IT" is not a dying field - that's a very misleading claim. IT is a broad spectrum of a lot of different fields, most of which are constantly changing and evolving, and growing faster than many others due to the huge increase in demand across nearly every sector for people who can understand technology, analyse problems and use their technical skills (whether in programming, hardware, maths, data manipulation, software configuration, etc.) to create solutions.
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ZdYnm8vuNR
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(Original post by MKay101)
ZdYnm8vuNR
Thank you for your reply and could i would like to know that what does computer science really involve? also is it hard as you have picked 2 really hard A levels. Also is economics an A level or a b tech because i want a third subject to enjoy and be easy so i dont have to worry about it and is it harder than business?

sorry for late reply.
Sorry for the late reply, haven't been on tsr for a while.

It consits of learning about how a computer works, eg. what does the CPU do, why is a GPU suited for processing graphics etc. Also stuff like, what algorithm should you use to get in between point A and B in the shortest amount of time, different data structures, and programming methods. Theres quite a bit of programming as it has coursework (worth 20% of the final grade) which contains a lot of programming.

You cna find the exact content here: https://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/170844...ience-h446.pdf (this is for the ocr exam board)
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