username5323908
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Ciao,
anyone know good ways to learn Italian.

I've got family over in Italy and feel kind of embarrassed that they have to talk English whenever I see them.

I've tried duolingo and dictionaries to write down phrases and I can string along basic sentences but want to proper learn it now I've got time off with lockdown.

Anything would be useful. Thanks
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username5279298
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#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
You could use memrise and quizlet for unfamiliar vocabulary. For grammar or verbs I use conjuguemos but I would check that it does Italian

Once you get a bit more confident in the language, the best way to become fluent (if that's the ultimate goal) is to immerse yourself by watching films, listening to music, reading books etc. If you struggle with specific vocabulary, find a funny way to remember it or stick it up somewhere that you look often (e.g: on the fridge), and hopefully it will stick.

Use the language as often as possible, speak and write however much you can. Other than that, best of luck :borat:
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username5323908
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#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Roses_Dreams)
You could use memrise and quizlet for unfamiliar vocabulary. For grammar or verbs I use conjuguemos but I would check that it does Italian

Once you get a bit more confident in the language, the best way to become fluent (if that's the ultimate goal) is to immerse yourself by watching films, listening to music, reading books etc. If you struggle with specific vocabulary, find a funny way to remember it or stick it up somewhere that you look often (e.g: on the fridge), and hopefully it will stick.

Use the language as often as possible, speak and write however much you can. Other than that, best of luck :borat:
Thanks so much I'll take a look into them.
I used memrise a while ago to learn some Sicilian words and it seemed pretty good. Cheers.
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JosephCiderBwoy
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#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by georgeparasol12)
Ciao,
anyone know good ways to learn Italian.

I've got family over in Italy and feel kind of embarrassed that they have to talk English whenever I see them.

I've tried duolingo and dictionaries to write down phrases and I can string along basic sentences but want to proper learn it now I've got time off with lockdown.

Anything would be useful. Thanks
Ciao! Lockdown is a perfect time to learn languages.
I've been studying Italian from scratch at university since October, and it's been quite easy. However, I've been studying French for ages and the languages have a strong lexical similarity. I would start by learning the alphabet; this way, you'll learn the sounds of each letter. Italian is phonetic, so it means every letter is pronounced. Let's look at ciao: c becomes soft before i, a is like bat, and o is like nor in a northern accent. Together it's like chow. Next, I recommend the subject pronouns and present tense. The subject pronouns are io, tu, lui/lei/Lei, noi, voi, loro/Loro (Lei and Loro capitalised is the formal version of you). Verbs in Italian are straightforward – 3 categories: -are, -ere, -ire. They are conjugated thus:
trovare --> (in the order of the aforementioned subject pronouns) trovo, trovi, trova, troviamo, trovate, trovano – remove the infinitive ending and add the endings, basically.
prendere --> prendo, prendi, prende, prendiamo, prendete, prendono – some lui, voi and loro forms have changed.
dormire --> like -ere verbs, but voi form is dormite
However, -ire verbs can have the infix of -isc- for all subjects except noi and voi:
finire --> finisco, finisci, finisce, finiamo, finite, finiscono
The rule of thumb for remembering which -ire verb has which conjugation is by looking at the 5th-last letter - is it a vowel? If so, it will have -isc-. Consonant? Normal conjugation like dormire.
The auxiliaries, essere and avere, are really important. They are irregular, and without them, you'd struggle a lot.
essere --> sono, sei, è (remember the accent; otherwise you're saying and), siamo, siete, sono.
avere --> ho, hai, ha, abbiamo, avete, hanno
I know this is a lot, but it's quite simple. I recommend this, which I regard as the Italian grammar bible: http://www.mmdtkw.org/ItalGram.html
On a final note, the subject pronouns are rarely stated, only if you're making a distinction, e.g. lui mangia i biscotti mentre lei beve la cioccolata.
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username5323908
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#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by JosephCiderBwoy)
Ciao! Lockdown is a perfect time to learn languages.
I've been studying Italian from scratch at university since October, and it's been quite easy. However, I've been studying French for ages and the languages have a strong lexical similarity. I would start by learning the alphabet; this way, you'll learn the sounds of each letter. Italian is phonetic, so it means every letter is pronounced. Let's look at ciao: c becomes soft before i, a is like bat, and o is like nor in a northern accent. Together it's like chow. Next, I recommend the subject pronouns and present tense. The subject pronouns are io, tu, lui/lei/Lei, noi, voi, loro/Loro (Lei and Loro capitalised is the formal version of you). Verbs in Italian are straightforward – 3 categories: -are, -ere, -ire. They are conjugated thus:
trovare --> (in the order of the aforementioned subject pronouns) trovo, trovi, trova, troviamo, trovate, trovano – remove the infinitive ending and add the endings, basically.
prendere --> prendo, prendi, prende, prendiamo, prendete, prendono – some lui, voi and loro forms have changed.
dormire --> like -ere verbs, but voi form is dormite
However, -ire verbs can have the infix of -isc- for all subjects except noi and voi:
finire --> finisco, finisci, finisce, finiamo, finite, finiscono
The rule of thumb for remembering which -ire verb has which conjugation is by looking at the 5th-last letter - is it a vowel? If so, it will have -isc-. Consonant? Normal conjugation like dormire.
The auxiliaries, essere and avere, are really important. They are irregular, and without them, you'd struggle a lot.
essere --> sono, sei, è (remember the accent; otherwise you're saying and), siamo, siete, sono.
avere --> ho, hai, ha, abbiamo, avete, hanno
I know this is a lot, but it's quite simple. I recommend this, which I regard as the Italian grammar bible: http://www.mmdtkw.org/ItalGram.html
On a final note, the subject pronouns are rarely stated, only if you're making a distinction, e.g. lui mangia i biscotti mentre lei beve la cioccolata.
Wow! Thank you so much, this is amazing. I'll definitely refer back to here from time to time.
Never thought I'd have to learn how to say Ciao again
I learned abit of French for my GCSE and there are some similarities yes, German might also come in handy.
Thanks alot
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JosephCiderBwoy
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#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by georgeparasol12)
Wow! Thank you so much, this is amazing. I'll definitely refer back to here from time to time.
Never thought I'd have to learn how to say Ciao again
I learned abit of French for my GCSE and there are some similarities yes, German might also come in handy.
Thanks alot
Thank you so much, I'm glad I've been of some help. In bocca al lupo with your Italian journey. You will be speaking well one day, just keep at it.
The French will definitely help, the German not so much. Northern Italy is right below Switzerland so there'll be some dialect there, but from having studied both, they seem to have very little in common.
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