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Pursuing degree in psychology

I’m currently picking my path for Uni, and am certain I want to pursue a career as a Psychologist. I am aware for this role I will need postgraduate education which I am prepared to do so. I am wondering if I can pursue a bachelors degree in nursing with mental health, or I must follow the route of doing psychology BPS accredited at Undergrad. I have looked into unis and most postgraduate places accept as long it’s a career relevant to psychology. I just think I can gain more enhanced experience through mental health nursing but unsure if that blocks my pathway for a BPS accredited psychologist
You could do a bachelors degree in mental health nursing but would then have to complete a conversion course (MSc) before progressing onto a more specialised path i.e. clinical, forensic, educational etc. This would involve potentially another MSc followed by a BPS Stage 2 qualification or professional doctorate.

So yes, it's possible but would only take you longer and cost you more. There's plenty of opportunity to gain experience whilst studying or between qualifications, you could look at bank HCA/support worker roles and work alongside mental health nurses.
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by Munknown20
I’m currently picking my path for Uni, and am certain I want to pursue a career as a Psychologist. I am aware for this role I will need postgraduate education which I am prepared to do so. I am wondering if I can pursue a bachelors degree in nursing with mental health, or I must follow the route of doing psychology BPS accredited at Undergrad. I have looked into unis and most postgraduate places accept as long it’s a career relevant to psychology. I just think I can gain more enhanced experience through mental health nursing but unsure if that blocks my pathway for a BPS accredited psychologist

Hello, to become a certified psychologist in the UK you must have BPS accreditation - this can be gained through a 3 year accredited psychology undergraduate degree, or through a one year accredited conversion MSc. There are pros and cons of both, but the general advice would be that if you want to go into psychology it is better to take the degree and then change your mind later, than do something else and have to spend more time and money on the conversion MSc. I don't know as much about specific mental health nursing courses, but from my understanding it may reduce how many clinical psychology related career paths you can access.
Good luck with whatever path you choose to follow in the future!
-Kat (2nd year undergraduate psychology student at Lancaster University)

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