The Student Room Group

Is this a ******** veiled threat?

So I haven't been attending my school for the past 5 days because I have e exams in 5 weeks and have chosen to stay home and revise (for context, I am 18 and these are A-level examinations)

My school has sent an email telling me that I am legally required to go to an "examination compliance meeting" in order to be legally registered to take the exam. Is this just a means of getting us into school in order to chastise us for our choices or is this is a genuine requirement (I haven't found anything even remotely useful online)

Because I just feel that this is a bluff.
Reply 1
Bro, it's a meeting, it'll take like half a day at most. Just go.
Reply 2
Original post by Guru Jason
Bro, it's a meeting, it'll take like half a day at most. Just go.


That's not my question, it's if it is necessary or they are talking about something that is even legitimate.
Reply 3
Original post by quagmiretoilet
So I haven't been attending my school for the past 5 days because I have e exams in 5 weeks and have chosen to stay home and revise (for context, I am 18 and these are A-level examinations)

My school has sent an email telling me that I am legally required to go to an "examination compliance meeting" in order to be legally registered to take the exam. Is this just a means of getting us into school in order to chastise us for our choices or is this is a genuine requirement (I haven't found anything even remotely useful online)

Because I just feel that this is a bluff.


Your school registers you for the exam so ultimately they'd have the say on whether you take the exam or not
Reply 4
Original post by quagmiretoilet
So I haven't been attending my school for the past 5 days because I have e exams in 5 weeks and have chosen to stay home and revise (for context, I am 18 and these are A-level examinations)

My school has sent an email telling me that I am legally required to go to an "examination compliance meeting" in order to be legally registered to take the exam. Is this just a means of getting us into school in order to chastise us for our choices or is this is a genuine requirement (I haven't found anything even remotely useful online)

Because I just feel that this is a bluff.

Your school claims government funding for teaching you. They are obligated to ensure that you are attending to justify that funding and will have their own processes for tracking and recording. I've never heard of an "examination compliance meeting" that is presumably part of their process. Regardless of the dubious 'legally required' bit, the fact remains that they can withdraw your exam entries if you fail to comply with school rules (unlikely, but possible) so you should attend this meeting and sort this out.
Yes, it's legitimate. They need to make sure you're a real, active student and not a ''ghost'' so they can register you for exams. Now, stop being stubborn and just go to the meeting because you don't want to be bunking so much in order to study only to find out you've been withdrawn from all your exams due to non-attendance.
Reply 6
Original post by gdunne42
Your school claims government funding for teaching you. They are obligated to ensure that you are attending to justify that funding and will have their own processes for tracking and recording. I've never heard of an "examination compliance meeting" that is presumably part of their process. Regardless of the dubious 'legally required' bit, the fact remains that they can withdraw your exam entries if you fail to comply with school rules (unlikely, but possible) so you should attend this meeting and sort this out.


Thanks for your reply. First of all it is a private school and all fees (including examination fees) have been paid in advance. As well as this, myself, among the others that have opted to revise at home have predicted A-levels that either meet or surpass their firmed university option.
Yeah it's all a big conspiracy to 'get you!

*sigh* just to school ffs kid, unless you want to opt out of all the exams :tongue:
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 8
Original post by quagmiretoilet
Thanks for your reply. First of all it is a private school and all fees (including examination fees) have been paid in advance. As well as this, myself, among the others that have opted to revise at home have predicted A-levels that either meet or surpass their firmed university option.

Then that's a different situation in that you (/your parents) are a paying customer in dispute with your service supplier. Why they have taken this approach I cannot guess but there is a clear implication that your exam entries are in doubt unless you attend this meeting. Regardless of who has paid the fees, the exam entry has been done through the school and can be withdrawn by them. You can either comply with the requirement to attend and discuss the situation or get your parents to argue the case with the school head teacher.
Reply 9
Original post by gdunne42
Then that's a different situation in that you (/your parents) are a paying customer in dispute with your service supplier. Why they have taken this approach I cannot guess but there is a clear implication that your exam entries are in doubt unless you attend this meeting. Regardless of who has paid the fees, the exam entry has been done through the school and can be withdrawn by them. You can either comply with the requirement to attend and discuss the situation or get your parents to argue the case with the school head teacher.


You can't withdraw OCR A-level applications and Edexcel has a deadline and extreme late fee deadline that passed a while ago.
Reply 10
Original post by quagmiretoilet
You can't withdraw OCR A-level applications and Edexcel has a deadline and extreme late fee deadline that passed a while ago.


Do you have a definitive source for that information? Obviously it's up to you if you want to battle with your school on this issue but I have worked in exams administration and, while you can't get any kind of fee refund, Edexcel candidates can definitely be withdrawn after the late fee deadline. It often needed to be done if a candidate could not complete a course and the centre does not want them to be selected for moderation of centre assessed NEAs.
(edited 11 months ago)

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