The Student Room Group

What do you think I would get on these practise questions? C+P Edexcel

My history teacher has gone on maternity leave and we have supplies in our lessons and so there isn't really anyone to ask to mark these questions that I have attempted so it would be really useful if anyone would be able to mark them / give me feedback! I have currently only attempted 4 markers however I am hoping to complete other questions too.

Here are some that I have completed today...

Trials were similar between medieval times and early modern England as both were heavily influenced and made unfair by religion and the church. In Medieval England, up until 1215, the superstitious method of trial by ordeal was used where it was believed that God would influence the result to show whether the accused was innocent or guilty. In Early Modern England, more lenient Church Courts were used to trial clergymen, who would be able to read and write and so would read a Bible passage, however, this led to people learning the "neck verse" in order to be trialled in the more lenient court where capital punishment was less common.

One way in which the roles of communities was similar between medieval England and the 20th century was the way they impacted law enforcement positively. Hue and Cry was commonly used to catch criminals in medieval times, where a whole village would leave their stations and hunt down the offender. In the 20th century, communities were still able to impact enforcement due to the new 999 line that allowed civilians to report crimes. The Neighbourhood Watch was also a community-run method of enforcement in the 1900s.

Thank you so much :smile:
Original post by raindropxox
My history teacher has gone on maternity leave and we have supplies in our lessons and so there isn't really anyone to ask to mark these questions that I have attempted so it would be really useful if anyone would be able to mark them / give me feedback! I have currently only attempted 4 markers however I am hoping to complete other questions too.

Here are some that I have completed today...

Trials were similar between medieval times and early modern England as both were heavily influenced and made unfair by religion and the church. In Medieval England, up until 1215, the superstitious method of trial by ordeal was used where it was believed that God would influence the result to show whether the accused was innocent or guilty. In Early Modern England, more lenient Church Courts were used to trial clergymen, who would be able to read and write and so would read a Bible passage, however, this led to people learning the "neck verse" in order to be trialled in the more lenient court where capital punishment was less common.

One way in which the roles of communities was similar between medieval England and the 20th century was the way they impacted law enforcement positively. Hue and Cry was commonly used to catch criminals in medieval times, where a whole village would leave their stations and hunt down the offender. In the 20th century, communities were still able to impact enforcement due to the new 999 line that allowed civilians to report crimes. The Neighbourhood Watch was also a community-run method of enforcement in the 1900s.

Thank you so much :smile:

I’m no examiner, but I think you’ve answered both questions well enough to get 4/4 for each. Your point directly answers the question, you’ve added at least 1 additional detail to support the point and the information provided is clear and accurate.

I would personally reword the second point to “…was their influence on law enforcement” or something similar to clarify that the 20th century communities themselves are influencing policing in some way as much as medieval communities (and then slightly alter the paragraph accordingly), but what you’ve written seems absolutely fine and I believe you’d get the marks either way.

Strong start! :smile:
(edited 9 months ago)
Reply 2
That is very reassuring, thank you so much! I always end up doubting myself as my teachers usually mark us down to avoid us getting complacent :s-smilie: Thank you :smile:

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