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How to balance a part time job, classes, and home life

So I’m starting college this fall. And I’m worried about balancing a part time job and school. Along with my house/living accommodations on campus. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage to keep these all organized?
Reply 1
Original post by Anonymous
So I’m starting college this fall. And I’m worried about balancing a part time job and school. Along with my house/living accommodations on campus. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage to keep these all organized?


You can't 🤣
Reply 2
Original post by Anonymous
You can't 🤣


So in other words I’m helpless? :bawling:
Reply 3
Original post by Anonymous
So in other words I’m helpless? :bawling:


It's just like if you are going to move out for uni then you aren't going to be able to spend time with famliy especially if you live far.
Original post by Anonymous
So I’m starting college this fall. And I’m worried about balancing a part time job and school. Along with my house/living accommodations on campus. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage to keep these all organized?

Hey there!
To be honest, there's no sure way to do this. I found that once I got a part-time job, the majority of my shifts were on a weekend so I barely got a chance to go home. If I did, I had to get time off for it weeks in advance. If you want to keep uni and a part-time job organised then the best thing to do is make sure the majority of your shifts are on a weekend. Of course this doesn't help with balancing home life but sometimes you have to make sacrifices. Sometimes employers take advantage of students that are willing to work long hours so don't let them rope you into working every single night and make sure you know when it's time to say no without feeling bad about saying it. When I had a part-time job, I made sure I was going home once every two months because that's all the time I could take off. It's also good to make sure if you get a job that it's somewhere relatively close to your accommodation or even with good travel links to get back to it. The worst outcome would be that you can't get home after a long shift so make sure you have your travel routes set out.

Hope this helped!
Lucy - Digital Student Ambassador SHU
Reply 5
Original post by Anonymous
So I’m starting college this fall. And I’m worried about balancing a part time job and school. Along with my house/living accommodations on campus. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage to keep these all organized?

I have managed to do this, although I still live at home with my parents because my uni is in my home city. In all honesty it depends on you and how much work you can handle, if you're going to work alongside studies it may be beneficial to you to consider is the number of hours you'll be working, my uni recommend no more than 16 hours and that seems fair, it'd be worth looking for; part time, casual, flexible roles so that your studies aren't compromised.

In regards to balancing things with studying, try whenever you can, if you can study during breaks at work then that's a great thing and it'll help you out, all my co-workers do the same (just check with your manager first though - I usually bring notes and non - digital materials). In my schedule I also try to study through a variety of ways on my own sometimes and also with friends vary it to your own needs and that way you can still socialise. It's also worth trying out different study materials and sifferent study methods to keep things interesting and motivating.

Lastly for your living stuff, try and make a timetable around your current schedule to do chores on certain days, do meal prepping for the busiest days of your week and give yourself time too, especially during holidays to make memories with family and friends.

Good Luck!
Reply 6
Eat well and exercise.
Reply 7
I think you want to spend time with family and I agree like they are the priority for me anyway, especially parents, they brought me into the world. I personally wouldnt leave them for uni, Ill wait till I am a bit older and move out then. Plus you'll have job so will you definitely be able to afford for accommodation, food , bills and all the tuition fees etc? Tbf you are probably getting student loans but do you actually want that future debt, if not all them years as well when you might not even get a job through it in the end unless you get really lucky.
Original post by Anonymous
So I’m starting college this fall. And I’m worried about balancing a part time job and school. Along with my house/living accommodations on campus. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage to keep these all organized?

Hey!

I think this is a worry for most students and is definitely something that I was apprehensive about before starting at ARU.

Prior to starting ARU, I studied a full time access course and I also worked part time as a carer. I did have to reduce my hours to make it work and it was intense but I got through it. I kept at diary during this time and wrote in it everyday. This helped me to keep on top of my studies by setting myself small daily tasks (work, studies and home life). I tried to do an hour or two of collage work each evening to keep on top of things.

When I started at ARU, I also started my clinical placements. With placements working part-time was a lot and I reduced my hours even further. After some time I decided to give up the care work and focus on my studies. However, I still wanted to be able to earn money!

I’m now working for ARU temps as a student ambassador and a digital student ambassador. These are great options as you choose when to work and you get to work open days and other events, which are always fun! You can also apply for other flexible shifts with other organisations through ARU temps. I’m sure your university will offer something similar, maybe you could look into this if you’re struggling?

ARU temps also hires people that aren’t students at ARU. So if you’re studying nearby this could also be an option for you!

My advice, don’t overwhelm yourself worrying before you’ve even started. It will be challenging to start and does take some organising but it can be manageable. Just take each day as it comes and if it’s getting too much, you can alter your hours to work for you.

I hope this helps :smile:

Sophie (ARU)
Quick question.

When you say “I am starting college in the fall” does that mean that you are studying in the USA?

I ask as it makes a heck of a difference to the answer you will receive 😁

Thx
Reply 10
Original post by Johnny Valentine
Quick question.

When you say “I am starting college in the fall” does that mean that you are studying in the USA?

I ask as it makes a heck of a difference to the answer you will receive 😁

Thx


Yes I live in the USA
Original post by Anonymous
So I’m starting college this fall. And I’m worried about balancing a part time job and school. Along with my house/living accommodations on campus. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage to keep these all organized?

Hello,

Congratulations on beginning college in the september! It's totally reasonable to be nervous about juggling your part-time work, educational obligations, and living arrangements on campus. But don't worry, you can effectively traverse these areas of college life with excellent organisation and time management.I had several difficulty at first. However, after some time, several useful hints kept me organised.

Firstly, create a weekly plan with time slots for classes, study sessions, job hours, and personal time. This will assist you in visualising your obligations and ensuring that you allocate adequate time for each. You should prioritise your most critical jobs and assignments and work on them first. This manner, you can balance your academic obligations with your work and housing situations.

In addition, keep open channels of contact with your teachers, work supervisors, and roommates/residence advisors. Inform them of your plans and discuss any potential conflicts or changes that may develop. I believe you should create good study habits such as breaking down your homework into digestible portions, taking advantage of campus facilities such as libraries and study clubs, and getting assistance from tutors or academic support services as needed.

Prioritise self-care and schedule time for rest, exercise, and social activities. Remember that a healthy, balanced lifestyle will help you focus and reduce stress. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or unable to balance everything, don't be afraid to seek help from college resources such as academic advisers, career services, or counselling centres.
They can offer advice and help that is targeted to your individual need.

Remember that this is a learning experience, and it may take some time to develop your own rhythm and balance. Be kind with yourself and remain on top of your tasks. You can do it!

I wish you a rewarding and successful college experience!

I hope this is helpful.
Kind regards,
Mrunali Kalbhor,
University of Sunderland Student ambassador
Original post by Anonymous
So I’m starting college this fall. And I’m worried about balancing a part time job and school. Along with my house/living accommodations on campus. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage to keep these all organized?


Hi,
In my experience this was easier than I anticipated. In your first year of university the academic workload is not as overwhelming as you would think. In my experience you are eased into the work as you are learning the foundations of academic learning and writing. Having a part time during university is very common and definitely doable, if you are worried about balancing a job, work and social life consider seeing what jobs are available at your university. Many universities offer work as a student ambassador or other similar programmes of work, as you are working for your university they tend (in my experience) to be more relaxed if you need some time off due to a upcoming deadline or something of that nature.
Hope this helps. Faye :smile:
It depends how many work shifts you're going to be doing I think. I found I could only do 2 a week without study and any other activities/events I wanted to do being impacted :smile:
Original post by Anonymous
So I’m starting college this fall. And I’m worried about balancing a part time job and school. Along with my house/living accommodations on campus. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage to keep these all organized?

Hey there! Congrats on starting university this autumn! I totally understand the pressure that comes with trying to balance university, work, and living arrangements. As a second year cyber security student at De Montfort University, I would suggest creating a schedule or a to-do list. This will help keep you organised and prioritise tasks. It's important to set aside designated times for studying, work, and leisure activities. You may also want to consider finding a part-time job on campus if possible (e.g. student ambassador), as it can be more flexible and accommodating to your schedule. Don't forget to take breaks and prioritise self-care, as it's important to maintain a healthy balance.

Best of luck to you!

- Ilya :wink:
Original post by Anonymous
So I’m starting college this fall. And I’m worried about balancing a part time job and school. Along with my house/living accommodations on campus. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to manage to keep these all organized?


Hello,

It's normal to feel worried about how to balance everything and most people will struggle at some point. However, the key thing that I have learnt is to know when to say no to things. For example, working out how many hours a week you can reasonably do at your job and letting your manager know. This will prevent them from putting you on too many shifts, which can quickly lead to stress.

Having a planner is also a good way to stay on top of things as this will allow you to see how much time you have and organise everything around your priorities. It can also help with productivity and help to fit everything in.

If you are finding that you are struggling, it's important to reach out to your university to express this and find the appropriate support. This will help to prevent it impacting your studies and allow you to do your best!

Hope this helps!
Reply 16
Thank you all so much! Y’all have been super helpful.
Hi there,

There is no right way of approaching this as people have different methods for balancing their time! My recommendation is having a planner on your phone and checking it regularly! It's so easy for something to slip your mind so make sure you keep a note of anything you have planned for the week - dont rely on just remembering, ive failed at this many times.

Importantly dont overwhelm yourself. Don't agree to do insane numbers of shifts just to keep someone else happy, you should be realistic about what you can achieve in your time as to not overstress yourself. Also make sure to schedule in down time! Just because youre "free" doesn't mean you have to be. Take some time alone to decompress and relax amongst your studies/work.

Also remember your priorities. Its important to remember why youre there and not to let yourself focus on the wrong thing at the wrong time. If at any point you find yourself struggling reach out to someone - whether thats your tutor, well-being services or just the univeristy in general, theyll be able to provide you with appropraite support.

Hope this helped,
- Sophie (uni of Bath)
Original post by Anonymous
Thank you all so much! Y’all have been super helpful.

Balancing college, a part-time job, and living arrangements can be challenging but manageable with good organization. Here are some tips:

Create a Schedule: Use a planner or digital calendar to schedule your classes, work hours, and study time. Stick to it as closely as possible.

Set Priorities: Identify your top academic priorities and allocate sufficient study time for them.

Communication: Keep open communication with your employer about your class schedule and availability. Many employers are willing to work around your class hours.

Efficient Study Sessions: Use focused study techniques like the Pomodoro method to make the most of your study time.

Utilize Campus Resources: Take advantage of on-campus resources like libraries, study groups, and academic advisors.

Budget Wisely: Create a budget to manage your finances, including tuition, housing, and daily expenses.

Meal Prep: Plan your meals in advance to save time and money. Consider a meal prep day each week.

Delegate Tasks: If possible, delegate household chores or responsibilities among roommates or friends.

Self-Care: Prioritize self-care with regular exercise, sufficient sleep, and relaxation to manage stress.

Seek Support: Don't hesitate to seek help from professors, advisors, or campus counseling services if you feel overwhelmed.

Stay Flexible: Be prepared to adjust your schedule if unexpected events arise.

Time Management Tools: Use apps or tools like to-do lists and task managers to stay organized.

Remember that it's crucial to find a balance that works for you personally. It may take some time to adjust, but with careful planning and perseverance, you can successfully manage college, work, and living arrangements.
Hi there

It may be possible to balance these things out. A part time job and school can be balanced out well if you plan your times properly, making sure that the schedules do not crash. This maybe hard to grip at the start of the term, as it will take time to know how much time to spend on each module's preparation. But this is something that you will become accustomed to over time.

In terms of living on campus whilst visiting home, that really depends on your schedule. For myself I tend to go back on reading weeks and end of terms. If I really needed to, I would make sure I finish all my studies and part-time shifts so I can head home for the weekend.

Another way to spend time with your family would be frequent phone calls or video calls. :biggrin:

I think that self-care is really important to stay organised at school, knowing your limits, getting enough rest and exercise, as well as eating well. Take time to settle into school and develop routines/schedules overtime.

Hope this helps.
Chloe
-University of Kent Student Rep

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