The Student Room Group

Geography Water Cycle

Evaluate the view that most transboundary water conflicts are impossible to solve.

This is a question iam struggling with at the moment, I feel I have a basic understanding of what the question is asking me but everytime I try to write it I don't quite manage to answer the actual question, that they are "impossible to solve". If anyone could give me a hand, preferably in a PEEEL structure , would be much appreciated :smile:)
Original post by charlottec0111
Evaluate the view that most transboundary water conflicts are impossible to solve.

This is a question iam struggling with at the moment, I feel I have a basic understanding of what the question is asking me but everytime I try to write it I don't quite manage to answer the actual question, that they are "impossible to solve". If anyone could give me a hand, preferably in a PEEEL structure , would be much appreciated :smile:)


Point one: One that is possible to solve: Colorado River as they have some sort of treaty saying that all parties should have equal access to the water.
Point two: One less possible to solve, maybe the Mekong River
Point three: One that is possible to solve but no results yet - Euphrates-Tigris river - Iraq joined the Paris Agreement due to the lack of water running through the country due to its climate and the dams that are upstream.
Point four: One that has ongoing conflicts that doesn’t seem to wittle down anytime soon e.g. the Nile.

Talk about water treaties as well as they play a role.

My conclusion to this would be they are able to be solved with the right decisions, e.g. joining a climate agreement, abiding by water treaties, etc.
Original post by charlottec0111
Evaluate the view that most transboundary water conflicts are impossible to solve.

This is a question iam struggling with at the moment, I feel I have a basic understanding of what the question is asking me but everytime I try to write it I don't quite manage to answer the actual question, that they are "impossible to solve". If anyone could give me a hand, preferably in a PEEEL structure , would be much appreciated :smile:)

its an evaluate so 20 marker, its not that you have to answer the question that theyre impossible, its just giving examples when theres conflicts that have been solved vs when they havent been solved. this is pretty much the same for majority of evaluate and analyse questions - give contrasting examples like the example above has done.

as for conclusions, my teacher had given us a guide to what it usually the best way to answer 20 markers. i've done this question for practice and got 18 and this was my conclusion. in the body of the essay i did 1 successful example, 2 water treaties, and 1 unsuccessful and linked them to political/social/economic/environmental factors:

To conclude, solving transboundary water conflicts is complex to consider as there are multiple social, political, economic and environmental factors that make each situation different, so it is difficult to generalise. Currently, there are examples of successful management such as the Rhine River as well as unsolved conflicts such as the Nile. Compromises can be difficult to reach due to contrasting wants and needs for the involved countries, but in the future due to the climate crisis, this may worsen as there is uncertainty. Increased demand for water supply could lead to further claims and disputes so the need for more water treaties and peace talks will arise. Whilst there is potential to reach agreements, present day examples show that the effects of climate change on water supply may exacerbate political tensions as governments will prioritise their country's needs over others in order to prevent social and economic issues.Countries with differing levels of development along rivers may have be harder to appease if there are differences in power and control of the resources so in the future, all transboundary resources should be used mindfully and fairly in order to relax tensions and prevent further conflict
Reply 3
You can also argue that Nile River, one of the longest rivers in the world, passes through eleven countries in Africa. Disputes over water allocation and utilization have arisen between Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia. The construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) by Ethiopia on the Blue Nile has been a major source of contention, as it could potentially affect downstream water flow and impact Egypt's water supply.

Quick Reply

Latest