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Royal Navy FATs

I have an interest in enlisting in the Royal Navy again as an Aircrewman.

I have been researching the requirements and found that you have to pass an FAT, I have read contradicting statements for this test. One saying it is completed after your initial interview and DAA, and another one saying it is after you have completed basic training and sit the FAT at Shawbury.

Any information would be greatly appreciated, along with resources to help me practice these?
Reply 1
Original post by AllahLaSmurf
I have an interest in enlisting in the Royal Navy again as an Aircrewman.

I have been researching the requirements and found that you have to pass an FAT, I have read contradicting statements for this test. One saying it is completed after your initial interview and DAA, and another one saying it is after you have completed basic training and sit the FAT at Shawbury.

Any information would be greatly appreciated, along with resources to help me practice these?

My understanding is that aircrew applicants will complete their aptitude testing at RAF College Cranwell towards the end of their application process, generally after passing AIB (if going commissioned). However, from chatting to other officer applicant's no one person's application is the same, with the exception of DAA being the first thing people complete. I'm in the university air squadron and had the opportunity to do a TIA (Test in Advance). I went to do CBAT (the RAF's name for FAT) at Cranwell before I had even done my fitness test. I put in a very competitive score so I would like to imagine that I have some authourity talking about CBAT/FAT.

Regarding practice. I would recommend the following:
- Know your times tables, at least up to 12.
- Get good at doing Speed, Distance and Time calculations. Likewise, with fuel burn calculations (which are more or less the same in terms of the maths).
- Video games probably aren't a bad shout. A game like Doom Eternal with lots going on requiring resource management and hand to eye coordination might not be a bad shout as well. However, times tables and SDT calculations would probably be a safer bet.

The night before:
- Do not drink (this should be very obvious)
- Get a good night's rest
- Do some final prep at your own discretion (I don't think I did much if any).
- Have a proper meal and stay hydrated.
- Get some snacks (granola bars, nuts, preferably not anything that will spike your blood sugar) and water for the day of testing (ideally a little thing for each of your 5 minute breaks). It is a long day. You don't want to be hungry or dehydrated.

On the day:
- Have a proper breakfast. Again, it won't help being hungry.
- Take advantage of all of your breaks. It is mentally tiring, so take a couple minutes to have some water, go to the loo, have a snack, etc...
- Take advantage of the example/practice runs and make sure you fully understand the instructions for all of the exercises.
- You will invariably think you're failing at some point (probably), I know I did on a few occasions. It's meant to be hard. Do your best to keep cool and just keep chipping away.
- Everyone will complete CBAT/FAT at a different rate. I was the very last person to finish in my cohort and I was probably among the highest scoring. Do not let it discourage you if you appear to be slow.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
Reply 2
Original post by Fin2001
My understanding is that aircrew applicants will complete their aptitude testing at RAF College Cranwell towards the end of their application process, generally after passing AIB (if going commissioned). However, from chatting to other officer applicant's no one person's application is the same, with the exception of DAA being the first thing people complete. I'm in the university air squadron and had the opportunity to do a TIA (Test in Advance). I went to do CBAT (the RAF's name for FAT) at Cranwell before I had even done my fitness test. I put in a very competitive score so I would like to imagine that I have some authourity talking about CBAT/FAT.

Regarding practice. I would recommend the following:
- Know your times tables, at least up to 12.
- Get good at doing Speed, Distance and Time calculations. Likewise, with fuel burn calculations (which are more or less the same in terms of the maths).
- Video games probably aren't a bad shout. A game like Doom Eternal with lots going on requiring resource management and hand to eye coordination might not be a bad shout as well. However, times tables and SDT calculations would probably be a safer bet.

The night before:
- Do not drink (this should be very obvious)
- Get a good night's rest
- Do some final prep at your own discretion (I don't think I did much if any).
- Have a proper meal and stay hydrated.
- Get some snacks (granola bars, nuts, preferably not anything that will spike your blood sugar) and water for the day of testing (ideally a little thing for each of your 5 minute breaks). It is a long day. You don't want to be hungry or dehydrated.

On the day:
- Have a proper breakfast. Again, it won't help being hungry.
- Take advantage of all of your breaks. It is mentally tiring, so take a couple minutes to have some water, go to the loo, have a snack, etc...
- Take advantage of the example/practice runs and make sure you fully understand the instructions for all of the exercises.
- You will invariably think you're failing at some point (probably), I know I did on a few occasions. It's meant to be hard. Do your best to keep cool and just keep chipping away.
- Everyone will complete CBAT/FAT at a different rate. I was the very last person to finish in my cohort and I was probably among the highest scoring. Do not let it discourage you if you appear to be slow.

Hope this helps. Good luck.


Thank you so very much for this answer !
Do the Aircrewmen take the same test a pilots? Or do they do an easier one? Or is the pass mark lower for aircrewman?
Reply 3
Original post by AllahLaSmurf
Thank you so very much for this answer !
Do the Aircrewmen take the same test a pilots? Or do they do an easier one? Or is the pass mark lower for aircrewman?
Hello, Air Crewman only do about 1 hour’s worth of CBAT testing. Whereas Pilots, WSOs & ATC’s do the full CBAT test 7-9 hours roughly. Hope this helps!

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