The Student Room Group

can someone offer feedback on my 12 marker? Geog A level edexcel

so i got my 12 marker back from my teachers and i got really low, they didnt really offer any useful feedback so i was wondering if anyone could read through it and maybe say how many marks it's worth, where i should also improve?

Assess the importance of tectonic hazard profiles in understanding the impacts which result from tectonic events (12)

A hazard profile is a graph which is a representation of the physical characteristics of a particular hazard and its main characteristics; eg magnitude, frequency, probability etc, they are beneficial to use when understanding the impacts which result from tectonic events because it can compare the physical processes that hazards share, it can help compare 2 events, eg haiti and japan, also helps identify what hazards need more management.

However the problem with hazard profiles is that when measuring an event, a high magnitude may not alway equal high impact, comparing japan and haiti, japan’s earthquake was a 9.0 which killed roughly 15,000, haiti’s earthquake was a 7.0 which killed around 250,000. Japan’s earthquake was obviously much higher but didn't kill as much as Haiti's. To add to that, a hazard profile may not always be correct as the scaling is non numeric, which makes it more subjective, and dependent on an individual’s opinion and interpretation.

Ultimately, hazard profiles are a good option when it comes down to identifying which specific management strategies should be implemented, but on the other hand, it doesn't represent the economic damage or the human factors ( which are just as important as the physical) therefore it is not that important, there are other methods you could use, for example the pressure and release model.
Reply 1
There’s not enough AO3, you’ve explained well but there is lack of evidence and wider reading. You need more scientific key terms and explanations. You mostly just stated. Fix your grammar and lengthen your work, add more research.

Here is an improved version; A hazard profile serves as a graphical representation that encapsulates essential characteristics of a specific hazard, including attributes such as magnitude, frequency, and probability. This tool proves invaluable when endeavoring to comprehend the far-reaching impacts ensuing from tectonic events. By scrutinizing and comparing the physical attributes of various hazards, one gains insights into their underlying processes and mechanisms. This facilitates a nuanced understanding of how different hazards share commonalities and divergences in their potential consequences.

One of the fundamental strengths of hazard profiles lies in their capacity to enable direct comparisons between two or more tectonic events. For instance, juxtaposing the earthquakes in Haiti and Japan underscores the inherent complexities in hazard assessment. While Japan's earthquake registered a formidable magnitude of 9.0, leading to around 15,000 casualties, Haiti's 7.0-magnitude earthquake resulted in a staggering loss of approximately 250,000 lives. This stark contrast highlights a crucial point: the relationship between magnitude and impact isn't always linear. This serves as a poignant reminder that a mere numerical representation of magnitude fails to encapsulate the intricate interplay of factors contributing to the severity of the consequences.

Yet, a notable limitation of hazard profiles becomes apparent when considering their non-numeric scaling system. This feature renders the interpretation of hazard attributes subjective, susceptible to individual viewpoints and interpretations. In essence, hazard profiles are only as accurate as the assumptions and judgments underpinning their creation. The challenge of translating qualitative information into a graphical format raises concerns about their reliability and universality. This aspect underscores the necessity for a holistic approach that takes into account diverse factors influencing the final hazard assessment.

In the pursuit of understanding the consequences of tectonic events comprehensively, the role of hazard profiles becomes pivotal in informing the choice of management strategies. By identifying shared patterns across different hazards, planners and policymakers can implement targeted measures to mitigate their impacts. Nevertheless, it's imperative to acknowledge that hazard profiles fall short in capturing the complete spectrum of impacts. Economic repercussions and human factors hold immense significance and contribute significantly to the overall picture. Therefore, the utility of hazard profiles remains limited by their focus on physical attributes, neglecting the intricate socio-economic dynamics intertwined with tectonic events.

For a more holistic understanding of the impacts stemming from tectonic events, alternative frameworks like the pressure and release model come into play. This model extends beyond the physical characteristics of hazards to encompass underlying vulnerabilities, societal inequalities, and environmental dynamics. By integrating these multifaceted aspects, the pressure and release model offers a more comprehensive perspective on the diverse impacts of tectonic events.

In conclusion, while hazard profiles offer a valuable tool for assessing the impacts of tectonic events, their significance is tempered by their inability to account for the broader economic and human factors. Their strengths in facilitating hazard comparison and management strategy formulation should be weighed against their limitations. To obtain a more holistic view, the integration of alternative models that encompass social and economic dimensions, like the pressure and release model, is crucial. This amalgamation of approaches will foster a more comprehensive understanding of the complex consequences arising from tectonic events.
Reply 2
Original post by Catlova67
There’s not enough AO3, you’ve explained well but there is lack of evidence and wider reading. You need more scientific key terms and explanations. You mostly just stated. Fix your grammar and lengthen your work, add more research.

Here is an improved version; A hazard profile serves as a graphical representation that encapsulates essential characteristics of a specific hazard, including attributes such as magnitude, frequency, and probability. This tool proves invaluable when endeavoring to comprehend the far-reaching impacts ensuing from tectonic events. By scrutinizing and comparing the physical attributes of various hazards, one gains insights into their underlying processes and mechanisms. This facilitates a nuanced understanding of how different hazards share commonalities and divergences in their potential consequences.

One of the fundamental strengths of hazard profiles lies in their capacity to enable direct comparisons between two or more tectonic events. For instance, juxtaposing the earthquakes in Haiti and Japan underscores the inherent complexities in hazard assessment. While Japan's earthquake registered a formidable magnitude of 9.0, leading to around 15,000 casualties, Haiti's 7.0-magnitude earthquake resulted in a staggering loss of approximately 250,000 lives. This stark contrast highlights a crucial point: the relationship between magnitude and impact isn't always linear. This serves as a poignant reminder that a mere numerical representation of magnitude fails to encapsulate the intricate interplay of factors contributing to the severity of the consequences.

Yet, a notable limitation of hazard profiles becomes apparent when considering their non-numeric scaling system. This feature renders the interpretation of hazard attributes subjective, susceptible to individual viewpoints and interpretations. In essence, hazard profiles are only as accurate as the assumptions and judgments underpinning their creation. The challenge of translating qualitative information into a graphical format raises concerns about their reliability and universality. This aspect underscores the necessity for a holistic approach that takes into account diverse factors influencing the final hazard assessment.

In the pursuit of understanding the consequences of tectonic events comprehensively, the role of hazard profiles becomes pivotal in informing the choice of management strategies. By identifying shared patterns across different hazards, planners and policymakers can implement targeted measures to mitigate their impacts. Nevertheless, it's imperative to acknowledge that hazard profiles fall short in capturing the complete spectrum of impacts. Economic repercussions and human factors hold immense significance and contribute significantly to the overall picture. Therefore, the utility of hazard profiles remains limited by their focus on physical attributes, neglecting the intricate socio-economic dynamics intertwined with tectonic events.

For a more holistic understanding of the impacts stemming from tectonic events, alternative frameworks like the pressure and release model come into play. This model extends beyond the physical characteristics of hazards to encompass underlying vulnerabilities, societal inequalities, and environmental dynamics. By integrating these multifaceted aspects, the pressure and release model offers a more comprehensive perspective on the diverse impacts of tectonic events.

In conclusion, while hazard profiles offer a valuable tool for assessing the impacts of tectonic events, their significance is tempered by their inability to account for the broader economic and human factors. Their strengths in facilitating hazard comparison and management strategy formulation should be weighed against their limitations. To obtain a more holistic view, the integration of alternative models that encompass social and economic dimensions, like the pressure and release model, is crucial. This amalgamation of approaches will foster a more comprehensive understanding of the complex consequences arising from tectonic events.


thank you!!! i'll use this to improve my answer
(edited 6 months ago)

Quick Reply

Latest