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Should I choose Aerospace or Electrical/Electronics ?

I am quite passionate about both of these fields and can see myself (hopefully) working in a space company after I graduate. The thing is that enjoy learning about propulsion and aerodynamics, mechanics and materials as well as electrical/electronics, as I frequently tinker around with electronics and arduino/esp projects. So I don't really know what specific application in the space sector I want to focus on. I was just wondering if anyone had any advice or experience?
Original post by CubeSat
I am quite passionate about both of these fields and can see myself (hopefully) working in a space company after I graduate. The thing is that enjoy learning about propulsion and aerodynamics, mechanics and materials as well as electrical/electronics, as I frequently tinker around with electronics and arduino/esp projects. So I don't really know what specific application in the space sector I want to focus on. I was just wondering if anyone had any advice or experience?

Electrical engineering will peg you in more.

Id be inclined to say have you considered mechanical with electrical engineering.
Original post by CubeSat
I am quite passionate about both of these fields and can see myself (hopefully) working in a space company after I graduate. The thing is that enjoy learning about propulsion and aerodynamics, mechanics and materials as well as electrical/electronics, as I frequently tinker around with electronics and arduino/esp projects. So I don't really know what specific application in the space sector I want to focus on. I was just wondering if anyone had any advice or experience?

Electronics is a much better choice for actually securing a job in the space (or aerospace) industry, though this is mainly due to the number of grads from each discipline relative to the number of roles.
Reply 3
Original post by mnot
Electrical engineering will peg you in more.

Id be inclined to say have you considered mechanical with electrical engineering.

I have considered it, would that be better in terms of employability in the space sector or is it better to keep my options open?
Original post by CubeSat
I have considered it, would that be better in terms of employability in the space sector or is it better to keep my options open?

It depends what you want to do. Inevitably you will work (at least start off) in a narrower job focus then just working on space tech.

There are certainly opportunities in both. I am more familiar with seeing people on the mechanical side of space engineering but that is more due to the fact of my background (more mechanically focused).

The main problem with space is getting in the door. Particularly with the security protocols & the depth of industry in Europe is no where near as large as in say the US.

Do you want to work on materials, thermal management, propulsion, instrumentation, control systems… and what type of company are you interested in: SME, consultancy, public sector, academic research.
(edited 6 months ago)
Reply 5
Original post by mnot
It depends what you want to do. Inevitably you will work (at least start off) in a narrower job focus then just working on space tech.

There are certainly opportunities in both. I am more familiar with seeing people on the mechanical side of space engineering but that is more due to the fact of my background (more mechanically focused).

The main problem with space is getting in the door. Particularly with the security protocols & the depth of industry in Europe is no where near as large as in say the US.

Do you want to work on materials, thermal management, propulsion, instrumentation, control systems… and what type of company are you interested in: SME, consultancy, public sector, academic research.

Sorry for the late reply, but I am most interested in instrumentation, control systems and robotics, but I do find propulsion and thermodynamics interesting too. I probably want to work in SME but I don't really know for sure. It seems that mechatronics would probably be most suitable for this, am I right in saying that? What would I need to do to secure myself in the space sector like internships, projects? And for unis that don't have mechatronics, should I apply to aerospace or electrical/electronics? Sorry for bombarding you with so many questions, but thanks in advance for your help :smile:
Original post by CubeSat
Sorry for the late reply, but I am most interested in instrumentation, control systems and robotics, but I do find propulsion and thermodynamics interesting too. I probably want to work in SME but I don't really know for sure. It seems that mechatronics would probably be most suitable for this, am I right in saying that? What would I need to do to secure myself in the space sector like internships, projects? And for unis that don't have mechatronics, should I apply to aerospace or electrical/electronics? Sorry for bombarding you with so many questions, but thanks in advance for your help :smile:

Id recommend mechanical & electrical engineering.

EEE or mechatronics probably sets you up best for control systems & robotics however you won’t get thermodynamics or fuel based/traditional propulsion this way mechanical & aerospace are much more focused on this.

A combined mechanical & electrical would probably offer the best balance. Mechatronics could (theoretically) cover this although in practice mechatronics is more robotics systems not thermofluids.

Mechanical can lead to control engineering or aerospace but its not as strong on control systems as EEE (hence a combined degree would be a nice balance).

Getting a job in space tech in the UK is hard, but develop expertise & experience via internships (as relevant as possible) perhaps even intern in academic research - find a professor in the area your interested in (and you can get these through networking).
(edited 5 months ago)

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