The Student Room Group

Tattoo artist

what degree would be best to become a tattoo artist? I know you don't need a degree, but I would much rather have one there just in case.
Some kind of art/design degree may be useful background for developing your creative instincts, but as I understand it the actual process of tattooing is rather different to creating either digital or physical art in various media otherwise and is something you learn in an apprenticeship type model in a tattoo parlour.
Reply 2
Original post by artful_lounger
Some kind of art/design degree may be useful background for developing your creative instincts, but as I understand it the actual process of tattooing is rather different to creating either digital or physical art in various media otherwise and is something you learn in an apprenticeship type model in a tattoo parlour.

Thank you. I was actually thinking of interior design as that's sort of a 'back up' career choice. Could I still go into tattooing from that, though?
Original post by Anonymous
Thank you. I was actually thinking of interior design as that's sort of a 'back up' career choice. Could I still go into tattooing from that, though?


I don't think you need any kind of formal qualification to go into the field, you just need to actually undergo the training which I'm pretty sure is through an apprenticeship model usually - not necessarily in the formal UK meaning of the term but more generally in the sense of artist apprenticed to master to learn the trade?
Reply 4
Original post by artful_lounger
I don't think you need any kind of formal qualification to go into the field, you just need to actually undergo the training which I'm pretty sure is through an apprenticeship model usually - not necessarily in the formal UK meaning of the term but more generally in the sense of artist apprenticed to master to learn the trade?

Thank you!
Reply 5
Original post by Anonymous #1
what degree would be best to become a tattoo artist? I know you don't need a degree, but I would much rather have one there just in case.

hi! most tattoo artists suggest at least an art qualification (though it isn't required). this is a good way to build up a portfolio for a tattoo apprenticeship, where you will learn mostly everything you need to know about tattooing before getting a license and becoming an artist.
you mentioned an interior design course, and im sure you can still go into tattooing with that.
but what you really need for an apprenticeship is a portfolio, but that can be done outside of schooling. most shops recommend looking into different tattoo styles and creating your own original works from it.
Reply 6
Original post by awfulrad
hi! most tattoo artists suggest at least an art qualification (though it isn't required). this is a good way to build up a portfolio for a tattoo apprenticeship, where you will learn mostly everything you need to know about tattooing before getting a license and becoming an artist.
you mentioned an interior design course, and im sure you can still go into tattooing with that.
but what you really need for an apprenticeship is a portfolio, but that can be done outside of schooling. most shops recommend looking into different tattoo styles and creating your own original works from it.

hi!! i’ve done some more research since this post and i’m definitely going to uni, for probably an academic degree or interior design! i did a level art so i have a small qualification in art haha. for christmas i think i might ask for a beginners tattooing kit (with machine) to practice on some fake skin (definitely not real skin until an apprenticeship), to see if i genuinely enjoy tattooing and also to get a bit of experience for a portfolio. then, hopefully looking for a part-time apprenticeship while i’m at uni or just graduated 🙂 thank u so much for your response <3
Reply 7
Original post by Anonymous #1
hi!! i’ve done some more research since this post and i’m definitely going to uni, for probably an academic degree or interior design! i did a level art so i have a small qualification in art haha. for christmas i think i might ask for a beginners tattooing kit (with machine) to practice on some fake skin (definitely not real skin until an apprenticeship), to see if i genuinely enjoy tattooing and also to get a bit of experience for a portfolio. then, hopefully looking for a part-time apprenticeship while i’m at uni or just graduated 🙂 thank u so much for your response <3

i would actually recommend not getting a machine until you get an apprenticeship; tattoo artists actually tend to be a bit nit-picky with people who have used a tattoo machine while not under an apprenticeship and are reluctant to hire because it can create some bad habits with sanitation and going too deep into the skin. if you're in an apprenticeship the tattoo artists will get you to practice on fake skin under their supervision and teaching. i would probably wait to get an actual machine, and just focus on trying out different styles on paper, drawing on stuff like fruits to get a feel for curved canvases, and weighing down your art supplies so you can get used to drawing with a heavy object. if you want to get used to the feeling of a heavy vibrating drawing tool, there are some mimic machines out there that you can just slot a ballpoint pen into and it replicates the feel. have a think about that stuff before asking for a machine, because it might lower your chances later. you could still go for it, but bearing those warnings, practice extreme sanitation and get the correct needle depth drummed into your head so that its second nature.
if you're worried about not knowing if tattooing is for you, practice drawing on yourself or friends and family and see how it makes you feel. if you feel happy seeing your art on someones body, go for it! if not, there are still lots of opportunities out there for you. its a bit of a bummer response, but i want to offer as much advice as i can!
Reply 8
Original post by awfulrad
i would actually recommend not getting a machine until you get an apprenticeship; tattoo artists actually tend to be a bit nit-picky with people who have used a tattoo machine while not under an apprenticeship and are reluctant to hire because it can create some bad habits with sanitation and going too deep into the skin. if you're in an apprenticeship the tattoo artists will get you to practice on fake skin under their supervision and teaching. i would probably wait to get an actual machine, and just focus on trying out different styles on paper, drawing on stuff like fruits to get a feel for curved canvases, and weighing down your art supplies so you can get used to drawing with a heavy object. if you want to get used to the feeling of a heavy vibrating drawing tool, there are some mimic machines out there that you can just slot a ballpoint pen into and it replicates the feel. have a think about that stuff before asking for a machine, because it might lower your chances later. you could still go for it, but bearing those warnings, practice extreme sanitation and get the correct needle depth drummed into your head so that its second nature.
if you're worried about not knowing if tattooing is for you, practice drawing on yourself or friends and family and see how it makes you feel. if you feel happy seeing your art on someones body, go for it! if not, there are still lots of opportunities out there for you. its a bit of a bummer response, but i want to offer as much advice as i can!

thank you so much!
Hi,

It's great to hear that you have a clear career direction in mind. If you're considering pursuing a degree first, I agree that an Art & Design course would be ideal for this industry.

Several of my friends who are tattoo artists studied illustration while attending Arts University Plymouth. Our illustration course is an excellent art degree that equips you with the tools to explore your creative passion and build a professional portfolio. I have included a link below that you may be interested in reading.

BA (Hons) Illustration - https://www.aup.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/ba-hons-illustration

If you have any additional questions, please don't hesitate to contact us at Arts University Plymouth via email at [email protected].

Kate - Arts University Plymouth Rep
https://www.aup.ac.uk
💻 Email us at [email protected]
☎️ Call us on 01752 203402⁠
📱 Whatsapp us at 07722 744184⁠
The artist doesn't want any degree. That is an expert in one field. but your question is good, If any case someone asked for artist. Do you have any degree for that work?

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