The Student Room Group

A level exams in 50 days! Is there hope?

Before I ask my question I would like to say:
I am aware a levels are hard especially mine
I study Biology Chemistry Psychology
I’ve gotten E E U the U in chemistry in my most recent mock (November)
The reason I am doing so bad is because my year 12 was heavily disrupted by personal reasons and the start of year 13 was bumpy.
I pick up new knowledge quickly and remember things well.
Let’s assume this is to cover everything from the start.

My question is am I able to possibly achieve CCC by my exams? My plan at the moment is Uplearn and exam questions for psych and bio and a mixture of exam questions textbooks and videos for chemistry.
Any type of advice is welcome.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 1
there's this super helpful girl on tiktok called pcfg, i highly recommend watching her videos
Original post by HyperActiv3
Before I ask my question I would like to say:
I am aware a levels are hard especially mine
I study Biology Chemistry Psychology
I’ve gotten E E U the U in chemistry in my most recent mock (November)
The reason I am doing so bad is because my year 12 was heavily disrupted by personal reasons and the start of year 13 was bumpy.
I pick up new knowledge quickly and remember things well.
Let’s assume this is to cover everything from the start.

My question is am I able to possibly achieve CCC by my exams? My plan at the moment is Uplearn and exam questions for psych and bio and a mixture of exam questions textbooks and videos for chemistry.
Any type of advice is welcome.
Hi @HyperActiv3,

There's always hope! I was actually in a similar position to you back when I was about to sit my exams. I devised a routine that I found worked exceptionally well for me, and I hope it works for you too.

Like you, I also took Biology and Chemistry for A-Levels- and I needed to learn the syllabus from the beginning because I had forgot most of it. It seemed really overwhelming looking back at the textbook and all the notes I made throughout the year. But to be honest, you don't need to know everything that's in your textbooks- a lot of it is extra information on top of the content you actually need to know.

This is how I tackled it:
1) I worked alongside my specification points: I treated it almost like a check-list and everyday I would go cover one topic per subject. Spec points are such an underrated revision tool, and lots of students overlook it. Spec points are very specific and tell you exactly what you need to know, from definitions, diagrams, mechanisms etc... I would look through specific sections in the textbook or online resources to refine any notes and strengthen my understanding.

2) Blurting: After I had refined my notes for all the bullet points under the topic, I would attempt the blurting method. I found that blurting really helped engrain the content into my head and allowed me to memorise it much quicker. You can read up more on blurting here: https://bit.ly/3uCzvZl

3) Topical questions: after a few rounds of blurting, I would attempt topical questions for the topics I had just covered. This was to familiarise and prepare myself for the types and format of questions I can expect in the exam. To be honest, this was also an ego boost- because after attempting the questions and getting them right I would feel so satisfied and motivated to move on to the next topic or subject. It felt really rewarding.

Hope this helps,
Danish
BCU Student Rep
Original post by BCU Student Rep
Hi @HyperActiv3,

There's always hope! I was actually in a similar position to you back when I was about to sit my exams. I devised a routine that I found worked exceptionally well for me, and I hope it works for you too.

Like you, I also took Biology and Chemistry for A-Levels- and I needed to learn the syllabus from the beginning because I had forgot most of it. It seemed really overwhelming looking back at the textbook and all the notes I made throughout the year. But to be honest, you don't need to know everything that's in your textbooks- a lot of it is extra information on top of the content you actually need to know.

This is how I tackled it:
1) I worked alongside my specification points: I treated it almost like a check-list and everyday I would go cover one topic per subject. Spec points are such an underrated revision tool, and lots of students overlook it. Spec points are very specific and tell you exactly what you need to know, from definitions, diagrams, mechanisms etc... I would look through specific sections in the textbook or online resources to refine any notes and strengthen my understanding.

2) Blurting: After I had refined my notes for all the bullet points under the topic, I would attempt the blurting method. I found that blurting really helped engrain the content into my head and allowed me to memorise it much quicker. You can read up more on blurting here: https://bit.ly/3uCzvZl

3) Topical questions: after a few rounds of blurting, I would attempt topical questions for the topics I had just covered. This was to familiarise and prepare myself for the types and format of questions I can expect in the exam. To be honest, this was also an ego boost- because after attempting the questions and getting them right I would feel so satisfied and motivated to move on to the next topic or subject. It felt really rewarding.

Hope this helps,
Danish
BCU Student Rep
Thank you so much going to definitely start this, can I ask what you managed to get towards the end? I really appreciate the reply and will implant the method

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