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Can I apply for 4 courses each for DClinPsych in Clinical and in Forensic Psychology?

Can I apply for 4 courses each for DClinPsych in Clinical Psychology and DClinPsych in Forensic Psychology within the same year? Therefore, I would have applied for 8 different courses. Is it possible? How hard is it to get into the programme as a 22-23 year old next year?
Reply 1
Original post by MaxiCupcake
Can I apply for 4 courses each for DClinPsych in Clinical Psychology and DClinPsych in Forensic Psychology within the same year? Therefore, I would have applied for 8 different courses. Is it possible? How hard is it to get into the programme as a 22-23 year old next year?
Your age doesnt matter, but your experience/reflective/academic abilities will. Some people get on at 22 but vast majority closer to 30 (most people have 3 years plus of specific paid experience in mental health). You will be expected to work with the whole spectrum of mental health difficulties alongside producing a doctoral level project, so it is not for the faint hearted. Knowing yourself and your own unique strengths and vulnerabilities is key and some of this can only often happen through deep reflection and experiences. What I am trying to say is dont rush, apply when you are ready.

The clinical doctorate is completely different to the forensic doctorate, and while both have similarities are very different roles and working environments, so be really sure you know what you are applying for. I am a clinical psychologist so other more educated people on here will help you with the Forensic pathway. Applying for either has no bearing on the other (so yes you can apply for both).

Hope that helps,

Greg
Reply 2
Hi Greg,

Thank you for your detailed response - it is quite informative!

I am currently finishing my undergraduate degree in Psychology (BPS accredited) at the University of Leicester. I am also currently in the process of applying to some master's courses at different universities, to gain a deeper valuable experience and knowledge of psychology. I would call myself a very enthusiastic student with great academic achievement (high marks in upper-second and first classes) throughout my degree.

I am quite passionate for both routes of psychology, but over time with some further voluntary or work experience, on top of my current ones, will enable me to decide which career path I want to undertake (although I might two both of them at different stages of my life :grin:) .

Altought I am only 21 years old, turning 22 during the summer, I am indeed passionate on becoming a registered and certified psychologist so I can use my skills to the best capability as a practising psychologist to help those in need of help in the future.

I understand my strong ambition might not be enough to get me to where I want to be, a psychologist, but with the help with rich experience within the psychology setting will help me to broaden my knowledge as well increasing the chances of my application(s) being successful for a doctorate programmed funded by the NHS.

Thank you for your message. If you are offering any volunteering opportunities as a clinical psychologist (ideally online), then I would be happy to discuss it with you, even if it would be a one-time thing for an hour :smile:.

Best wishes,
Max
Original post by MaxiCupcake
Can I apply for 4 courses each for DClinPsych in Clinical Psychology and DClinPsych in Forensic Psychology within the same year? Therefore, I would have applied for 8 different courses. Is it possible? How hard is it to get into the programme as a 22-23 year old next year?

Whilst your enthusiasm is admirable, it is unlikely that you'll get onto the forensic doctorate with only a years experience. Your academic achievements are a strong start so I would now focus on getting as much experience as possible whilst studying for your masters and in the years after completion. Look at ways of directly working with your preferred client group - if assistant psychologist roles are still out of reach at this stage, consider voluntary work or HCA/support worker roles, the latter are invaluable in terms of the skills you pick up and your own professional development.
While nothing stops you applying, I would agree with above posters about how your application may fare in light of the competition for both of those routes.

The other thing I always ask fresh grads who want to apply straight from undergrad is to consider what the impact may be on them (beyond the £30 application fee) to be rejected multiple times. People usually ignore this and say they will be fine, but to get 8 course rejections can have an impact on your mental health, especially when you are starting out and often feeling vulnerable and unsure of yourself and are likely to be facing many rejections in assistant psychologist and related roles.

I have been around long enough to see that the cycle of applications has an impact on people. It is a standing joke in my service that you can accurately gauge the mood of the assistant psychologists from the time of year it is. And realistically speaking it is also not just one year. There are threads on this forum about people who have applied for multiple cycles and get rejected year on year and are still no further. When I talk to 'unsuccessful' applicants (which is 77% of the people applying) it is the repeated rejections, the uncertainty and the sense they are waiting to be chosen which is the most painful part.

It goes against the "Go for it! You can do anything" spiel that is common on social media, but do ask yourself if you really want to subject yourself to this from now.
Reply 5
Unfortunately very few people get into Dclin straight out of uni (unless you are a York student as they have a fast track).
Most people i have spoken to have worked as an assistant psychologist 1-3 years before successfully applying to Dclin.
And assistant psychologist posts are incredibly competitive too so might be worth looking into that.

I think with Clinical Psychology it may be best for you to get some experience first, not just to buy that time but also see if its a right fit for you? Its a big commitment, im a clinical psychology undergrad (3rd year) and I wanted to become a clinical psychologist too, but honestly after having open conversations with employees and employers in the field I decided it wasn’t me, and working for the NHS in general wasn’t for me either.

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