The Student Room Group

A level chemistry for a biology degree? (help please!!)

Im currently in year 11 and choosing my a levels. I think I want to study a biology degree and I know that a lot of universities require a level chemistry. I know the a level is very hard and am wondering if people think I would be able to do it. I have struggled with chemistry in year 10 and got a tutor but I have gotten 9s in the mocks this year. While I don't love chemistry I am quite academic and don't mind putting in lots of work. So I guess my questions are, how much do you need to love the subject to take it at a level? and how necessary is it for a bio degree? Any help would really be appreciated
Reply 1
Original post by ayla.s
Im currently in year 11 and choosing my a levels. I think I want to study a biology degree and I know that a lot of universities require a level chemistry. I know the a level is very hard and am wondering if people think I would be able to do it. I have struggled with chemistry in year 10 and got a tutor but I have gotten 9s in the mocks this year. While I don't love chemistry I am quite academic and don't mind putting in lots of work. So I guess my questions are, how much do you need to love the subject to take it at a level? and how necessary is it for a bio degree? Any help would really be appreciated

i would definetely say it helps cause that is what im doing atm
assuming from your post that you're going into smth with medicine (correct me if im wrong) it would be perfect although when u get to a level biology and chemistry can be quite challenging. In fact ppl who go down that career route choose bio and chem and smth else
Hope this helps
Reply 2
Original post by nobody_000
i would definetely say it helps cause that is what im doing atm
assuming from your post that you're going into smth with medicine (correct me if im wrong) it would be perfect although when u get to a level biology and chemistry can be quite challenging. In fact ppl who go down that career route choose bio and chem and smth else
Hope this helps
thank you! i'm not super interested in medicine, im more geared towards ecology/animal biology. however i know chemistry is still required for some biology degrees even if its not for medicine.
Reply 3
Original post by nobody_000
i would definetely say it helps cause that is what im doing atm
assuming from your post that you're going into smth with medicine (correct me if im wrong) it would be perfect although when u get to a level biology and chemistry can be quite challenging. In fact ppl who go down that career route choose bio and chem and smth else
Hope this helps
thank you! i'm not super interested in medicine, im more geared towards ecology/animal biology. however i know chemistry is still required for some biology degrees even if its not for medicine.
Reply 4
Original post by nobody_000
i would definetely say it helps cause that is what im doing atm
assuming from your post that you're going into smth with medicine (correct me if im wrong) it would be perfect although when u get to a level biology and chemistry can be quite challenging. In fact ppl who go down that career route choose bio and chem and smth else
Hope this helps
thank you! i'm not super interested in medicine, im more geared towards ecology/animal biology. however i know chemistry is still required for some biology degrees even if its not for medicine.
Original post by ayla.s
thank you! i'm not super interested in medicine, im more geared towards ecology/animal biology. however i know chemistry is still required for some biology degrees even if its not for medicine.

I would say for ecology/animal biology, you're less likely to need chemistry. I would just kind of look at a few unis you'd potentially wanna go to, and see what they require. If it's not an official entry requirement, you can prove your interest in the subject in so many other ways (EPQ, extracurriculars, work experience, summer schools, etc), so it just depends on what the official stance of the uni is.

However, chemistry does keep your options open for Biology careers, just in case you change your mind from that side of biology to something more like molecular biology (I did that exact thing - I went into college wanting to do Plant Biology but I'm going to Medicine in September instead). If you really don't want to do it, don't do it though. It's a bit different from GCSE - there a lot more maths, and organic chemistry is 1/3 of the a-level instead of just being 1 tiny topic.

Hope this helps :smile:
Original post by ayla.s
thank you! i'm not super interested in medicine, im more geared towards ecology/animal biology. however i know chemistry is still required for some biology degrees even if its not for medicine.

I would say for ecology/animal biology, you're less likely to need chemistry. I would just kind of look at a few unis you'd potentially wanna go to, and see what they require. If it's not an official entry requirement, you can prove your interest in the subject in so many other ways (EPQ, extracurriculars, work experience, summer schools, etc), so it just depends on what the official stance of the uni is.

However, chemistry does keep your options open for Biology careers, just in case you change your mind from that side of biology to something more like molecular biology (I did that exact thing - I went into college wanting to do Plant Biology but I'm going to Medicine in September instead). If you really don't want to do it, don't do it though. It's a bit different from GCSE - there a lot more maths, and organic chemistry is 1/3 of the a-level instead of just being 1 tiny topic.

Hope this helps :smile:
Original post by ayla.s
Im currently in year 11 and choosing my a levels. I think I want to study a biology degree and I know that a lot of universities require a level chemistry. I know the a level is very hard and am wondering if people think I would be able to do it. I have struggled with chemistry in year 10 and got a tutor but I have gotten 9s in the mocks this year. While I don't love chemistry I am quite academic and don't mind putting in lots of work. So I guess my questions are, how much do you need to love the subject to take it at a level? and how necessary is it for a bio degree? Any help would really be appreciated

I would say for ecology/animal biology, you're less likely to need chemistry. I would just kind of look at a few unis you'd potentially wanna go to, and see what they require. If it's not an official entry requirement, you can prove your interest in the subject in so many other ways (EPQ, extracurriculars, work experience, summer schools, etc), so it just depends on what the official stance of the uni is.

However, chemistry does keep your options open for Biology careers, just in case you change your mind from that side of biology to something more like molecular biology (I did that exact thing - I went into college wanting to do Plant Biology but I'm going to Medicine in September instead). If you really don't want to do it, don't do it though. It's a bit different from GCSE - there a lot more maths, and organic chemistry is 1/3 of the a-level instead of just being 1 tiny topic.

Hope this helps :smile:
A solid foundation in chemistry (especially organic chemistry) will set you up well for a biology degree and jobs in biology. You'll also carry out techniques in A Level chemistry practicals that are also used in biology laboratories.

I studied BSc Biomedical Science and then MSc Infection Biology at university, but I use knowledge and techniques taught in chemistry every day in the workplace.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 9
the organic chemistry is very very useful for biology and since you said you dont mind putting in the work, i would strongly urge you to take it. i take bio and chem and the organic is definitely helpful and makes sense. to me, bio and chem are a bit like physics and maths lol. they just compliment each other. also like others have said it will really open up your options just in case.
the organic chemistry is very very useful for biology and since you said you dont mind putting in the work, i would strongly urge you to take it. i take bio and chem and the organic is definitely helpful and makes sense. to me, bio and chem are a bit like physics and maths lol. they just go with each other. Also like others have said it will really open up your options just in case.
Reply 11
Original post by tastierspoon460
I would say for ecology/animal biology, you're less likely to need chemistry. I would just kind of look at a few unis you'd potentially wanna go to, and see what they require. If it's not an official entry requirement, you can prove your interest in the subject in so many other ways (EPQ, extracurriculars, work experience, summer schools, etc), so it just depends on what the official stance of the uni is.
However, chemistry does keep your options open for Biology careers, just in case you change your mind from that side of biology to something more like molecular biology (I did that exact thing - I went into college wanting to do Plant Biology but I'm going to Medicine in September instead). If you really don't want to do it, don't do it though. It's a bit different from GCSE - there a lot more maths, and organic chemistry is 1/3 of the a-level instead of just being 1 tiny topic.
Hope this helps :smile:

thank you- and yes that's why i'm considering it because i do want to keep my options open. i think i'd rather do just a biology degree rather than specialising in undergrad in ecology if that makes sense? but thank you!
Reply 12
Original post by 1582
A solid foundation in chemistry (especially organic chemistry) will set you up well for a biology degree and jobs in biology. You'll also carry out techniques in A Level chemistry practicals that are also used in biology laboratories.
I studied BSc Biomedical Science and then MSc Infection Biology at university, but I use knowledge and techniques taught in chemistry every day in the workplace.

thank you that's very helpful- that's good to know how useful it actually is!
Reply 13
Original post by Nat4695
the organic chemistry is very very useful for biology and since you said you dont mind putting in the work, i would strongly urge you to take it. i take bio and chem and the organic is definitely helpful and makes sense. to me, bio and chem are a bit like physics and maths lol. they just go with each other. Also like others have said it will really open up your options just in case.

thank you that's very helpful! and yes i guess they do work well with each other and will help me in the future
Original post by ayla.s
Im currently in year 11 and choosing my a levels. I think I want to study a biology degree and I know that a lot of universities require a level chemistry. I know the a level is very hard and am wondering if people think I would be able to do it. I have struggled with chemistry in year 10 and got a tutor but I have gotten 9s in the mocks this year. While I don't love chemistry I am quite academic and don't mind putting in lots of work. So I guess my questions are, how much do you need to love the subject to take it at a level? and how necessary is it for a bio degree? Any help would really be appreciated

I'm in year 13 about to sit my a levels and I study all three sciences. I would say that liking a subject does help because you will like to revise it and like to be in class learning that subject so you will do better but it isn't a must. Studying biology and chemistry together goes hand in hand especially in year 13 where you learn about DNA and amino acids in chemistry so you will be ahead of everyone who doesn't do biology.
Hi I do a level chemistry im year 13 and I went into it not ever loving the subject, the thing with chemistry is that it’s hard but because you spend a lot of time understanding it once you do understand it it’s harder to forget. It’s split into physical, organic and inorganic which are all very different which makes it nicer to revise. Inorganic is mostly memory based whilst organic and physical takes more understanding but from my experience it can be a little overwhelming but if you take it one topic at a time and give each topic a really good go you’ll understand it. Once you understand it it’s easy to get the marks as you tend to know what the question wants you to say unlike biology and so as long as you understand you’ll know what to write and you should get the marks. Hope this helps :smile:

Quick Reply

Latest