BlackHawk
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#3461
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#3461
(Original post by ricki429)
soz but going back to the 'basket weaving' thing - i know someone at 47sqn and 30sqn and both said that most of the pilots done say a degree in farming (agriculture) but still got in to the RAF, so i assume its easier to attend a UAS if u dont do much complicated theory work then. Because many ppl iv met say they never had much time for the UAS.
It is harder for people doing degrees like law and be able to keep up their pilot studies, but then it all depends what you want at the end of it. One guy I knew did a degree in real estate. As far as I know he's off to Cranwell soon.
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mrjackd
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#3462
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#3462
I think as long as you can tell them with some conviction why you chose the degreeyou did, they wont mind. If you had a love for basket weaving then im sure they wouldnt mind, as long as you could talk about it with some interest and knowledge, the same goes for any decisions you've made. If you had a well thought out reason, then they will see that it was well thought out and you didnt waste your time.
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ThomA2
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#3463
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#3463
Don't forget that UAS isn't a prerequisite. I wouldn't sacrifice doing an interesting or challenging degree just so I could join some club. If you don't have time for UAS then you don't have time, your degree should not suffer; although I would be very surprised if you didn't. Think how you'd look coming out with a degree in law and having attended UAS. Time management is a desirable trait in an officer.
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Nikki J S
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#3464
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#3464
(Original post by ThomA2)
Don't forget that UAS isn't a prerequisite. I wouldn't sacrifice doing an interesting or challenging degree just so I could join some club. If you don't have time for UAS then you don't have time, your degree should not suffer; although I would be very surprised if you didn't. Think how you'd look coming out with a degree in law and having attended UAS. Time management is a desirable trait in an officer.
Pretty awesome kinda club to join though. As the main aim for most of us on here is to dedicate our careers to the RAF, joining a UAS would provide a little bit of insight into what the life we're aspiring to will be like. So for that reason alone should be high on the list of priorities (regardless of how challenging the degree is), although admittedly some people will have less time to attend than others. Like some of the guys who are already in have said, they could have got a better class of degree if they'd dedicated more time to it, but feel the experience gained through attending the UAS was more beneficial to their careers than attaining a 1st in their subject. And don't forget that if you're sponsored, part of the deal is for you to attend UAS.
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md103
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#3465
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#3465
(Original post by Unregistered)
Hi everyone,
I'm 18 at the moment. I attended OASC last august and was awarded the pilot scholarship, which is direct entry as a pilot on a permanent commission (until im 38), plus £1000 for my upper sixth year, and a reserved place on the 'In-service' degree scheme (several years down the line i do an OU degree, paid for by the RAF, of course). Out of 277 pilot applicants only 2 of us were chosen, so listen in!
Go to RAF careers website, click on missions, then old missions. These are jazzed up versions of the 1st half hour of the aptitude tests. Practice these every day.
I recommend playing on a flight sim a much as you can, these will hone any innate ability you may (or may not) have. Knowing how an aircraft instrument panel looks will help loads.
Learn to do mental arithmetic almost subconsciously, by practice! You will have to do sums whilst doing a memory task and a vigilance task.
Get an IQ-type-test book. improve your problem solving abilities. Know how to read and estimate compass bearings, and how to read figures from charts and tables very rapidly.
About 40 candidates were at breakfast on my OASC course the 1st morning, after the first 5 hours (the aptitude test) all but 11 of us were on the bus back to grantham station! its pretty ruthless.
The rest of the day is medical tests (not a lot you can change there, but ensure you are roughly the right weight for your height and frame).
More medical checks the next day, and an INTERVIEW!!
Know everything about raf equipment, bases and operations overseas. Know current affairs, recent military campaigns (of any country), domestic affairs, cultural issues, political issues. Know sincerely why you want to join the RAF. Learn how to carry yourself in an i/v (posture, body language, eye contact). You'll have 20 minutes to answer questions about yourself, so sell yourself! The interview is blag-proof, be direct, confident and concise!
The fitness test is 20 metre shuttle runs (bleep test) which is hard as it is a maximal test. Train like a soldier for this, an run till your hanging out of your arse! Good fitness shows dedication and a mature approach to your application as a military officer.
In the leadership tasks have plenty of confidence and drive, get involved and dont be afraid to be vocal. What use is an idea if you keep it to yourself?
The planning task is all about good arithmetic (speed/distance/time) and speedy thought and accurate calculations. Dont let them rip your plan to shreds, they will try!
If you are successful at this stage, give yourself a pat on the back. They will, however, recall you after a period of time for more in depth medical checks.
Oh and by the way, you need 5 GCSE's and 2 A levels at the very least. A Good CV goes a long way. You cannot wear glasses, have asthma, hayfever, epilepsy, migraines or be outside weight and height limits.
Best of luck to anyone who tries OASC for entry as a pilot, its damn selective!
I hope this advice helps,
Godspeed!

Is it actually this tough for any-one wishing to join the raf in a trade such as the RAF police? oh and how many new entrants drop out due to aptitude/selection tests.
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BlackHawk
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#3466
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#3466
(Original post by md103)
Is it actually this tough for any-one wishing to join the raf in a trade such as the RAF police? oh and how many new entrants drop out due to aptitude/selection tests.
Provost officer or trades? Officer is harder to get due to the nature of the job and all selection is at OASC Cranwell. As for trades, it is easier to be selected, depending on numbers and you are selected from your local AFCO branch after a medical, interview, and aptitude.
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BlackHawk
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#3467
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#3467
(Original post by ThomA2)
Don't forget that UAS isn't a prerequisite. I wouldn't sacrifice doing an interesting or challenging degree just so I could join some club. If you don't have time for UAS then you don't have time, your degree should not suffer; although I would be very surprised if you didn't. Think how you'd look coming out with a degree in law and having attended UAS. Time management is a desirable trait in an officer.
Well, I can understand your point but what about someone going in who wants to be a pilot. Nothing else. Also they want a PC until the age of 38, or indeed extended up until 55. They are doing a degree and on a UAS trying to finish EFT. A degree is always important, but in this case so is the UAS. It isn't as important for people who are looking at becoming an engineer, lawyer, doctor, etc who don't have bursaries although it may look a bit odd them never having applied. It's not just some club, and I think many people who are looking at a full career in the RAF would do as much as possible before entry.
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BlackHawk
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#3468
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#3468
I'm just curious, what length of comission is everyone going for?
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ThomA2
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#3469
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#3469
I don't want you to take my point out of context. Perhaps "just some club" was a poor - albeit firmly tongue in cheek - choice of words, what I meant is that even assuming a career in the RAF is the ultimate goal, then doing a 'basket weaving' degree at the expense of whatever you would otherwise choose simply to allow time for UAS is ridiculous.

Based on the medical requirements for pilots, along with the competition and selection procedure assuming anything about future suitability is reckless. I don't mean to be the naysayer of the thread, and I hope everyone achieves what they set out for, but it pays to have a backup plan just in case.

Now, go and do something nice for your Mums!
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BlackHawk
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#3470
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#3470
(Original post by ThomA2)
I don't want you to take my point out of context. Perhaps "just some club" was a poor - albeit firmly tongue in cheek - choice of words, what I meant is that even assuming a career in the RAF is the ultimate goal, then doing a 'basket weaving' degree at the expense of whatever you would otherwise choose simply to allow time for UAS is ridiculous.

Based on the medical requirements for pilots, along with the competition and selection procedure assuming anything about future suitability is reckless. I don't mean to be the naysayer of the thread, and I hope everyone achieves what they set out for, but it pays to have a backup plan just in case.

Now, go and do something nice for your Mums!
I agree with you, everyone should have a backup plan, especially those going for pilot! Thats why the RAF recommendes that you have three choices of what you would like to do before you get down to Cranwell. I agree with you also that some degrees are worth more than others and people should be very careful about degrees in relation to UAS but in my case I didn't give a monkeys so to speak as I want a career in the RAF, not a degree and a job in civvy street. I'm going to sign up to an OU degree though as I find some subjects quite interesting and it would be fun to learn them.

Ok that probably doesn't make any sense whatsoever

lol my mum is hundreds of miles away enjoying a champagne lunch....
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wizzcidd
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#3471
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#3471
I noticed a few of you where thinking of joining the air cadets? I would highly recomend it to you.Ive been in the air cadets for about 1.5 years now. and its grate fun. you get free flying and shooting, visits to raf camps and drill of course :mad:. also you people who are over 16 get to do courses in parachuting and complete up to half of the flying hours you need for ppl
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hayelz81
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#3472
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#3472
(Original post by BlackHawk)
I'm just curious, what length of comission is everyone going for?
BlackHawk - I initially applied for 6 yr SSC, but after filter at my AFCO, was recommended to extend it to full (what with the cuts coming into effect ~ 2008, which would be when I would apply for extension. News was that of about 60 officers who applied for the extension, last year, none got it. *gulp*).

Which I did, but now also I am personally more convinced about the long-haul than the short-haul - not only does it show dedication but after my recent station visits, I think it really is for me.

There is the option, after about 8 years, I think, to review your permanent commission status. I await correction from those in the know if I am wrong!
How about yourself - SSC or PC?
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BlackHawk
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#3473
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#3473
(Original post by hayelz81)
BlackHawk - I initially applied for 6 yr SSC, but after filter at my AFCO, was recommended to extend it to full (what with the cuts coming into effect ~ 2008, which would be when I would apply for extension. News was that of about 60 officers who applied for the extension, last year, none got it. *gulp*).

Which I did, but now also I am personally more convinced about the long-haul than the short-haul - not only does it show dedication but after my recent station visits, I think it really is for me.

There is the option, after about 8 years, I think, to review your permanent commission status. I await correction from those in the know if I am wrong!
How about yourself - SSC or PC?
PC hopefully until the age of 55 if I am offered it. Then again, things change and with a pension at the age of 38 there may be things I would consider doing on civvy street, like raising a family.

I was always told to go for the PC if that is what you want as you may not get a PC from a SSC, but I would wait and see what others say as I'm not sure about it.
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Scorg
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#3474
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#3474
i'd have to say that pc is my aim, civil based jobs just arnt appealing to me. I've worked full time in IT in the past and I was just never happy
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Scorg
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#3475
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#3475
(Original post by BlackHawk)
I volunteer with the RSPCA at the minute and it's quite easily to get involved on a small scale, you just turn up. As for the ATC, I'm looking into that too actually though I sent away for the information pack and have still heard nothing Maybe its time for a trip down to AFCO or something.
Thats quite interesting about the RSPCA, although probabably not best suited to myself, im not too keen around animals.

your aircadet information pack is probably as lost as my raf carers back I requested a year ago. I even got a call in december (took them 8 months to ask but its still nice they did) from the recruitment main office asking if I was persuing things after receaving the pack :eek:

think what I will do is use the contact number for the dundee branch that was listed on the aircadet site and see what happens from there
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Scorg
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#3476
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#3476
(Original post by wizzcidd)
I noticed a few of you where thinking of joining the air cadets? I would highly recomend it to you.Ive been in the air cadets for about 1.5 years now. and its grate fun. you get free flying and shooting, visits to raf camps and drill of course :mad:. also you people who are over 16 get to do courses in parachuting and complete up to half of the flying hours you need for ppl
well im definetly over 16 be it im 24 now, so i'd be entering as a civilian instructor. I'd expect it to be a different experence, although if anyone knows better (probably everyone here ) they can correct me on that
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BlackHawk
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#3477
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#3477
(Original post by Scorg)
Thats quite interesting about the RSPCA, although probabably not best suited to myself, im not too keen around animals.

your aircadet information pack is probably as lost as my raf carers back I requested a year ago. I even got a call in december (took them 8 months to ask but its still nice they did) from the recruitment main office asking if I was persuing things after receaving the pack :eek:

think what I will do is use the contact number for the dundee branch that was listed on the aircadet site and see what happens from there
not an animal guy eh? Not even the fluffy bunnies? lol :p:
I'm looking into volunteering down my local homeless shelter. Give something back to the community and whatnot seeing as I only do the RSPCA once a week.

I think the moral of that story (for anyone reading this thread) is to go into your AFCO for anything you need
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BlackHawk
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#3478
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#3478
(Original post by Scorg)
i'd have to say that pc is my aim, civil based jobs just arnt appealing to me. I've worked full time in IT in the past and I was just never happy
I feel the exact same way. I can't explain it but I have no interest in civvy jobs at all. The forces is what I want, its just a need I have.
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Scorg
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#3479
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#3479
(Original post by BlackHawk)
not an animal guy eh? Not even the fluffy bunnies? lol :p:
I'm looking into volunteering down my local homeless shelter. Give something back to the community and whatnot seeing as I only do the RSPCA once a week.

I think the moral of that story (for anyone reading this thread) is to go into your AFCO for anything you need
fluffy bunnies? only when they are providing the easter eggs Although they are a bit of a menace around here, there are a massive amount of wild ones in the area which end up being featured in the local papers every so often after distroying a crop of one of the local farmers.

Never thought about homeless shelter, there is one in my town center, right next door to thomas cook of all places.

Something ive seen at work about getting involved with the companies youth action fund committee which could be good to get involved with.

also, shock horror :eek: IT buddies needed over in lothian, bit of a trek but it maybe good to put some skills I obtained to use for once

There is alot on offer and my company im with seem really keen for us to be involved.
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Scorg
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#3480
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#3480
(Original post by BlackHawk)
I feel the exact same way. I can't explain it but I have no interest in civvy jobs at all. The forces is what I want, its just a need I have.
It was strange for me, 2 years ago, while I was still at uni, was starting to become disalusioned with the IT sector having worked in it before going to uni so I decided to try and workout what else interests me and see where my options go with that. I had never been the pro active type either but I had always an interest into the military with events that are happening and equipment they are using, it slowly kept creeping into mind, what about the forces until it became the only career I really wish to persue now.
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