Rhys
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#1121
Report 15 years ago
#1121
Are you saying the math does not get any harder than basic times tables, the stuff i learnt in primary school!?
Do they send you a letter giving you details and percentages of how you done at OASC or tell you in a de-brief before you leave?
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Philos
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#1122
Report 15 years ago
#1122
(Original post by Rhys)
Are you saying the math does not get any harder than basic times tables, the stuff i learnt in primary school!?
Do they send you a letter giving you details and percentages of how you done at OASC or tell you in a de-brief before you leave?
Basic primary school addition, subtraction, multiplication and division is all you will need for most of the test, th other maths you will definatly need is an extensive knowledge of SDT, Speed Distance Time!! but apart from that you'll need to have basic, accurate and quick mental maths, e.g 15 x 20, 18 - 3, 22+ 6, 8/4!! its you abbility to do this along side other things they are testin you on and how accurate and quickly you do it, because once you enter a number you cant go back, so forexample if the question were 3 x 4....answers 12, but if you put 21 because you put the number in the wrong order you cant change it!!, so make sure you typing is qucik and acurate too!

They will de-brief you individually after everything else has happened, on the last day of part 1 they do full medical, eye sight, interview, medical de-brief and full de-brief where the reviewing officer will go through your progress, achievements and targets, basically said if you passed the apptitude and what you need to work on aswell as things like other branch choices if they say you not up to aircrew or you chosen branch.

Hope that helps if you need some more advice just post me a thread or my msn address is [email protected]
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Arch-Angel
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#1123
Report 15 years ago
#1123
(Original post by Wzz)
..You might not be eligible for aircrew, but you'd make an awesome controller; here're some books, go read for a while, come back for part 2; that sort of thing.
It also works in reverse - unless I'm very much mistaken. You can try for a ground commission only to be told that you passed, with ease, the aptitute tests for aircrew... (naturally you still can't wear glasses!)
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Philos
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#1124
Report 15 years ago
#1124
(Original post by Arch-Angel)
It also works in reverse - unless I'm very much mistaken. You can try for a ground commission only to be told that you passed, with ease, the aptitute tests for aircrew... (naturally you still can't wear glasses!)
Yes that is correct, there was a guy on my course who was going for Engineer Officer but passed everything including pilot, he was told if it wasnt for his need to wear glasses he could have applied for an aircrew branch.

hope that answers you

Phil
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Scorg
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#1125
Report 15 years ago
#1125
Dont know if any of you remember back to when I visited the afco, during the chat the corparal was trying to sale aircrew to me, yet I wear glasses.
So either I cant do that and she was thinking about numbers or there is some exceptions in the aircrew branch?

This wouldnt be my first choice of a career but i'd be open to the idea of it. So if this can be cleared up anyways, that be handy
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jamesfyvie
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#1126
Report 15 years ago
#1126
Hey everyone, found out that i got a "silver", in other words i passed OASC but i'm getting reboarded in October and fighting it out with everyone else who also got a "silver".
I heard that around the august - september time of year, the raf is more selective as they get a better quality of applicant, ie school leavers and uni graduates, is this true? And does this mean that i still stand a good chance of getting through?
Hopefully i will hear something soon but any info would be great, i would like to try and put my mind slightly at ease either one way or the other, being in limbo really isn't great. Especially when you have to try and explain it to family and friends who don't really understand.
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Nikki J S
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#1127
Report 15 years ago
#1127
(Original post by jamesfyvie)
Hey everyone, found out that i got a "silver", in other words i passed OASC but i'm getting reboarded in October and fighting it out with everyone else who also got a "silver".
I heard that around the august - september time of year, the raf is more selective as they get a better quality of applicant, ie school leavers and uni graduates, is this true? And does this mean that i still stand a good chance of getting through?
Hopefully i will hear something soon but any info would be great, i would like to try and put my mind slightly at ease either one way or the other, being in limbo really isn't great. Especially when you have to try and explain it to family and friends who don't really understand.

What are the gradings at OASC and what do they mean?
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steve_nels
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#1128
Report 15 years ago
#1128
(Original post by Wzz)
Be honest. Hiding something and having it found later will crucify your application; mentioning it early means there's at least a chance for dialogue. You might run into trouble if you've used an inhaler unless there's a very good note on your records talking about how it wasn't for asthma. Good luck.
This is the letter that i received, managed to find it:

Dear Steven

Thank you for your letter of 14 November

I have had an opportunity to review your medical records. At the age of three and at the age of five, you had an episode of wheezing in the context of an upper respiratory tract infection. This is not asthma.

Many pre-school children are wheezy wen they have colds and do not go on to develop asthma. Since you have not had any episodes of wheezing since the age of five, you can confidently tell your RAf careers officer that you do not have a history of asthma.

Hope this will be satisfactory
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maverick_87
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#1129
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#1129
So did you get put on an inhaler at the ages of 3 and 5 reffered to on the letter? because hopefully thats all that i had, as i was placed on an inhaler both at 4 and 5 i think, for no more than 2 weeks each time, and a course of drugs the first time. I have never had any syptoms since. Thanks by the way for the replies on my earlier post, now I can just pray that my doctor sends me back a note something like that!
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Wzz
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#1130
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#1130
(Original post by Nikki J S)
What are the gradings at OASC and what do they mean?
I've posted on this thread I think about some of the replies you're likely to get. Generally, you're either in, in the pool, or out. If you're in the pool you go into a "playoff" against other candidates who passed selection but didn't stand out enough to be a definate pick for a small number of places. If you're out, you'll get advised on when, if ever, to return.

Grading wise, you're rated from 0 to 7. A 0 is completely incompatible for service (criminal convictions, drug addiction etc), while a 7 is a shoe-in to pass IOT.
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Wzz
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#1131
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#1131
(Original post by Jamie_JAGGERS)
So did you get put on an inhaler at the ages of 3 and 5 reffered to on the letter? because hopefully thats all that i had, as i was placed on an inhaler both at 4 and 5 i think, for no more than 2 weeks each time, and a course of drugs the first time. I have never had any syptoms since. Thanks by the way for the replies on my earlier post, now I can just pray that my doctor sends me back a note something like that!
I'm not in the medical branch so I really do hesitate to try and quote policy on this. If you've ever used an inhaler; regardless of whether it was for asthma, wheezing, on a whim or whatever, you may run into some snags.

I'd recommend that during an OASC medical, or the post-medical debrief, you mention it. If it turns up in your medical records that you were prescribed an inhaler, you might find that you end up rejected with no opportunity to discuss it.

So I'd bring it to the forefront and discuss it as soon as I could.
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Arch-Angel
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#1132
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#1132
(Original post by Wzz)
I'm not in the medical branch so I really do hesitate to try and quote policy on this. If you've ever used an inhaler; regardless of whether it was for asthma, wheezing, on a whim or whatever, you may run into some snags.

I'd recommend that during an OASC medical, or the post-medical debrief, you mention it. If it turns up in your medical records that you were prescribed an inhaler, you might find that you end up rejected with no opportunity to discuss it.

So I'd bring it to the forefront and discuss it as soon as I could.
I'd have to agree (not that Wzz needs me to agree with him!). If you bring it up then you're able to provide details. Plus, you clearly demonstrate that you're not avoiding the issue - might score you a point or two for integrity...
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steve_nels
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#1133
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#1133
(Original post by Wzz)
It's broadly correct, but it's always simplified for use in the air. If you're flying due north at (say) 120kts (as you will in the Tutor), with the wind coming from 030 degrees at 20kts, what heading should you fly to actually follow the black line on your map?

The wind is 30 degrees off; we use the "clock code" to work out how much of it affects you. The "full clock" is 60 minutes. 30 degrees is half of 60, therefore half of the wind is across you.

However, as you're progressing at 2nm per minute, you don't apply the full windspeed correction. Use the 1 in 60 rule (I'll drag out the full explanation if anyone's interested; it's been a while since EFT groundschool!), and you apply a correction equal to windspeed/speed in nm per min.

Hence at 2nm/min, 20kts wind, you apply a correction of 10. But as mentioned we only want half of it, so we correct by changing our heading 5 degrees into wind, and fly 005 degrees.

When you start doing low level flying a lot faster, you ignore wind, but it always affects at high level.
and how quick are u to work that out in the tests?
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ex-recruiter
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#1134
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#1134
Your 'asthma' should have been declared to the recruiter at your AFCO. P2(commissioning) applicants are asked to complete a medical questionaire which asks if you have suffered/do suffer from a number of complaints, one of which is asthma. If the answer to any of the questions is yes then you are given a supplementary form asking questions specific to that particular complaint. The completed questionaire is then submitted by the AFCO to OASC who then supply the AFCO with the list of branches you can apply for. Therefore declaring a condition at OASC which should have been declared at the start of your application process is not the way forward. I would suggest a visit to your AFCO. Good luck with your application.
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Wzz
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#1135
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#1135
(Original post by steve_nels)
and how quick are u to work that out in the tests?
You're working things like that out in the air. Generally you've got a few seconds; you read the heading off your map, read the wind off your map, and then select the correct heading and speed to fly as you approach a point to turn.
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Philos
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#1136
Report 15 years ago
#1136
I have got my RAF OASC debrief tomoz see what i need to do for next year, hopefully they dont slate me too much lol, does anybody have any advice on how to inccrease your confidence in the interview situation and show the boarding officers your true charateristics? Thats wat let me downb this time round they saw my references and saw how outgoing and funny i was but they said i needed to project this more in the interview, has anybody got any advice on how to get over this boundry?

chears phil
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rafaelshumy
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#1137
Report 15 years ago
#1137
Hi all,

I have learnt most of the points which are going to be brought up in the interview at OASC. However, living in France I am not up to date with the current home affairs. So if any of you have ideas of headlines which have been top stories in the UK let me know.

As for world affairs, do you think that the following are suitable?
-Israel/Palestine
-Chechenia
-Irak

And if you have ideas of other world affairs let me know.

Thanks
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JMC
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#1138
Report 15 years ago
#1138
EU expansion is popular.

How do you feel about the influx of foreigners coming to take British jobs?

And the elections in the US- learn what party Bush is and what party Kerry is.
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Scorg
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#1139
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#1139
Can talk about Turkey in particular, how its causing unease with the EU to allow membership due to thier stance on human rights and laws they are setting up at the moment
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REME-Bod
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#1140
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#1140
(Original post by Philos)
I have got my RAF OASC debrief tomoz see what i need to do for next year, hopefully they dont slate me too much lol, does anybody have any advice on how to inccrease your confidence in the interview situation and show the boarding officers your true charateristics? Thats wat let me downb this time round they saw my references and saw how outgoing and funny i was but they said i needed to project this more in the interview, has anybody got any advice on how to get over this boundry?

chears phil

Practice, practice and practice again. Get family/friends/teachers to stage interviews with you. Put yourself in the shoes of the interviewer and think about what questions they may ask and what answers they would expect. the hardest questions to answer are always "Why?" and "What do you think of...?" because these require thought to answer as opposed to simply quoting facts.

Interviews can be unnerving as you don't tend to know what is expected of you. This applies to any interview be it the RAF, Army, or for a job in Burger King. But you can speak confidently on anything you know well, so learn your subject matter.

Think about it... if you were stopped in the street by someone asking directions. If you are unsure of the route you'd be hesitant and possibly questioning yourself. Whereas if you knew the route well, you'd rattle it off without a problem, even emphasising key points to look out for.

An interview is the same. If you're questioned on something you know well, you can relax and answer with confidence. (Just don't be TOO confident).

(Alternatively, imagine your interviewer is naked - that was the tip I got from my father when I applied to join the Army.)
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